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  1. #41
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    Dieseldoc is correct! If your lathe shows you a set at 29 change it to 61. You probably have the scale reading 90-0-90 not 0-90-0. So what you have it set to is actually 61 degrees and if you cut a thread it will look like a stairway on the right side of the V and your thread will look more like a check mark rather than a V.
    Last edited by Froneck; 04-24-2019 at 09:18 PM. Reason: reversed 0-90-0, I wrote it backwards

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    Any chance you could video threading? If not, I can video how I do it with a 60ish degree setting and post it. Welcome to a fun hobby. Avoid losing limbs and never trust the lathe. Itís trying to dismember you!

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    I think I got it guys, I did move the compound to 61 degrees and started a mew thread. But the warden of the kitchen yelled at me to come eat. I’ll finish it tomorrow and let ya know. But I bet it is good to go now.

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    You’re good to go now.

    Here’s my view on my Asian lathe.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Hazzert View Post
    I will say though that for most small threads just leave the compound at 0 and feed in with the apron not the cross slide it makes about zero difference for most every day threads.
    Iíve found this to be the case as well. Somewhere along the line I read that using the compound for threading became standard in a production setting as a means to control costs on cutting tool maintenance/replacement. Iíve got lots to learn though, not advising anyone how to do it. Iíve done it both ways, with carbide and HSS steel inserts and ground HSS. My results have been acceptable. Now if I could just master holding that damned 3 wire. Need a 3rd handNeed help with threading

    As an aside, I would like to compliment the group here in the help thatís been offered to myself and others. Many places get real snooty about newbies.

  9. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbflyer View Post
    Now if I could just master holding that damned 3 wire. Need a 3rd handNeed help with threading
    Look up thread triangles, they can be a little easier to use. I canít remember the manufacturer but someone makes clips that hold the wires onto your mic anvils. I believe I saw them on Travers Tool, possibly amazon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hazzert View Post
    Look up thread triangles, they can be a little easier to use. I canít remember the manufacturer but someone makes clips that hold the wires onto your mic anvils. I believe I saw them on Travers Tool, possibly amazon.
    Isn't this what Gordon Clarke does for a living?

    For God's sake, at least throw the man a bone, even if his politics are difficult...

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonok View Post
    Isn't this what Gordon Clarke does for a living?

    For God's sake, at least throw the man a bone, even if his politics are difficult...
    Sorry, when he starts talking I generally stop reading. Which one of these does he manufacture? Flexbar makes the threadwire holders and several manufacturers make thread triangles.

    Edit:
    He is flexible measuring systems. I’ve never heard of them sorry.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonok View Post
    Isn't this what Gordon Clarke does for a living?

    For God's sake, at least throw the man a bone, even if his politics are difficult...
    For everyday gunsmith threading you just make the threads to fit. If I need to know the pitch diameter I'll use a thread mic or go/no go gauges. I watched most of their video and Flexible Measuring Systems uses calipers. I'm sure there's advantages, but I prefer a micrometer.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

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    One reason to come in at about 30 is that steel and aluminum like some positive rake so the flow of martial is much easier and so less tendency to have build-up on the thread OD. It is not always easy to have positive rake on both sides of tool bit point. Yes, a chip breaker type insert does often have the/some equivalent of a positive attitude at both side of the point.

    Another reason is that the pull out can draw back away from a shoulder or the end of the thread.

    Another reason to come in at about 30 is so only one side of the point is doing the cutting so .001 in-feed is just.. Straight feed on the dial .001 is .001 on the right and .002 on the left side.

    I think a new guy should learn turning threads by the book, then gaining experience venture to trying new things.
    I think the new guy would be best served practicing with a HSS tool bit with perhaps 5-7* top race off the cutting edge. HSS also because HSS is often sharper that most inserts.

    Yes 29 1/2* seems to be that norm here so that is fine/OK...but some new guys don't seem to know what side of the 30 that is.

    I know this is this is a tired old argument and I don’t wish to argue abut it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MilGunsmith View Post
    A.R.Warner makes HSS inserts. Use a positive rake and run it slow. Carbide needs a faster surface speed to cut properly. Good cutting fluid also, most use dark sulphur pipe cutting oil. Bacon grease or lard works well also. I have been cutting threads for over 40years and find that the old methods still work best. Get a piece to practice on and scribe a mark with the tip of tool to simulate a shoulder to stop at. This way the worst thing that could happen is to run past it instead of crashing.
    Carbide works as good as HSS for threading at slow speeds. BUT it needs to be sharp, either sharpened on diamond wheel to mirror polish or use good laydown inserts.
    Mitsubishi VP15TF inserts have worked very nicely for me.

    (Besides, AR warner HSS inserts are all zero rake as far as I remember)

    Not sure if this was mentioned already to OP but: Don't waste your time practicing threading on 1018 mild steel or such.
    416 or cr-mo barrel steel threads soo much nicer that you are wasting time if you wonder about torn ugly threads on mild steel.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    Carbide works as good as HSS for threading at slow speeds. BUT it needs to be sharp, either sharpened on diamond wheel to mirror polish or use good laydown inserts.
    Mitsubishi VP15TF inserts have worked very nicely for me.

    (Besides, AR warner HSS inserts are all zero rake as far as I remember)

    Not sure if this was mentioned already to OP but: Don't waste your time practicing threading on 1018 mild steel or such.
    416 or cr-mo barrel steel threads soo much nicer that you are wasting time if you wonder about torn ugly threads on mild steel.
    I use the AR Warner TPMC 32 NV HSS insert for threading. They are a positive rake.

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    Doing gun work and often one or few-ups the speed of doing the job is not as important as quality.

    AR Warner TPMC 32 NV HSS insert may be the best way to go.

    But they are costly. likely one can square up the insert or tool holder to make square to the part so not needing using a fish gauge.

    https://www.amazon.com/Arthur-R-Warn.../dp/B01JTPN9YA

    looks like 10* back rake
    TPMC 32 NV

    Such would be better for using @30 or straight in feed.

    For @ 30* angle of the side would be better.
    Last edited by michiganbuck; 05-06-2019 at 01:30 PM.

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    I got it straightened out now fellas! I did have to set the compound to 61 degrees. Now my threads look great. I really appreciate the help guys! Especially from those of you who were not being condescending!

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    Someone said don’t mess with [“Don't waste your time practicing threading on 1018 mild steel or such.”]

    I think you should turn, thread and surface finish some 1018 and A 36 just to get a feel for such common steels.

    Also pick up a loop and have a way to mount the loop on a rod so you can attach to a mag base or something for use to pick up an existing thread and work it in exact form. Good to learn that in turning practice ,not on someones/customer's part. Loop is also good for checking your inserts and tool bits

    Good to get a hard copy of How to Run a Lathe, and read it cover to cover. Yes old fashioned and not much if any on carbide but a good read needed to becoming decent on a lathe.

    Good to buy a bunch of used HSS tool bits so you might look at them and so understand how they might be used.

    Aiernuo Loupes 10x Glass Jeweler Loupe Loop Eye Magnifier Magnifying Magnifier 691168296390 | eBay

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    Old barrels are also fun to work on. I have many Mauser,Moisin,Arisaka,Enfield etc takeoff bubba'd barrels collecting dust in the corner of my shop. Part off the existing threads and start over, or turn down the face and rechamber/extend the thread/shoulder.
    Don't cost nuthin as Bluto said...

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    There was a little discussion about the lube for threading, I literately cut several miles of threads every year, some small,some not so small- #2-56 up to about 8-7/8" - 1/2 tpi are the regulars. Most of it's with carbide, insert or brazed tools, the 1/2 tpi inserts are rather expensive so these get the hand ground brazed tools, occasionally HSS. I've used sulpherized cutting fluids, synthetics, and lard. For some of the square and acme threads when the tool contact becomes somewhat intense, staying sharp is critical (both the tool and you). One trick that I've discovered over the years that helps finish in almost all applications, steal a stick of your kids or grandkids sidewalk chalk and chalk your threads between cuts, you'll be surprised - sometimes I give the threads a splash of WD40 and then run the chalk over the threads before cutting.
    Another thing I preach to the newbies, dry run the process. I'll set a new guy up with a shaft, tool and use masking tape on the shaft that becomes the imaginary shoulder. Ten wraps of tape on the shaft and let them dry run, practice engaging and disengaging the half-nut, coaching them to continually increase the rpm so the surface speeds appropriate, if they cut the tape, it's the same as a crash. An hour or two of practice here and they generally get it. Most become so comfortable with threading it's a non issue from then on. Wish I had remedies this simple for some of the other issues employees have.
    Just my two cents.

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    i did this professionally ,and we never used more than 4or 5 passes......the thread was finished with a hand held chaser,which was 50 times quicker than trying to skim a thread to size with the leadscrew....nice shiny finish to gauge size.....then the job was put onto a Cri Dan threading machine,and we were all out of work...that thing could do a perfect thread in 10 seconds at 2500rpm.

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    Tip for holding on to thread wires...stick them into a little square of dense foam. Like the grey kind that comes packed around computers. You can oriented the three thread wires through the foam in roughly the orientation you want, then just jiggle them into the correct thread groves with one hand.

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    This is by far, the best explanation/demonstration of thread cutting geometry
    using modeling software- I've seen.

    Blows away some common "myths", as well.

    Joe Pie is a "go to" for lots of valuable tips//tricks, for novice as well as experienced machinists.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=PnH_oeOUps4&t=248s

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