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    Default OT/Looking for advise on a scope

    I'm taking a shot (no pun intended) & assuming the guys that post on the gunsmithing potion of this forum are avid hunters.
    I have just bought a Winchester 350 Legend and plan on going deer hunting for the first time this fall. What scope would you recommend I pair with this rifle. I'd like to keep it under $1000.00 Also, do you think I made a decent choice for my first gun?
    You're advise is much appreciated.

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    I had no idea what a 35 legend was. Seems to be a mid power 35 caliber. That being supposed I would guess you will be hunting in heavier cover with ranges from 50 to 150 yards. With all the suppositions I hope I am on the right track. If so a 2.5 to 3 power scope should give you a wide field of view and fast on target ability. A variable set on low power could give that and more precision if you have the time to zero in for a meat sparing neck shot.

    A lot will depend on where you are hunting and how spooky the local deer are. I could hunt from my from door with a 22 and iron sights if rimfires were legal. Other places you may be looking at 200 yard running shots. More info will be needed to help you more but if I am close to being right $500 should get you a scope, mount, and rings for a good low power fixed scope.

    I have killed 2 coyotes (4 legged kind) from the front door of my house and one from the back door of my shop with a 22.

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    If you hunt in low light and want very good value for money scope have a look at meopta. I have / had a lot of the bigger names nightforce, Leupold, Khales, Swarovski, weaver etc etc and bang for bucks optically and especially in low light I think you'll be really surprised.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NewGunPlumber View Post
    If you hunt in low light and want very good value for money scope have a look at meopta. I have / had a lot of the bigger names nightforce, Leupold, Khales, Swarovski, weaver etc etc and bang for bucks optically and especially in low light I think you'll be really surprised.
    I think meopta made the zeiss conquest scopes. They were definitely descent scope.
    Don


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

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    Quote Originally Posted by D Nelson View Post
    I think meopta made the zeiss conquest scopes. They were definitely descent scope.
    Don


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Yeah I think there is some affiliation there with ziess also also sig. I think the ziess conquest line was rebadged meopro scopes. I have a few different meopta scopes but really like their 3-12x56 meostar for low light. Swarovski are similar optically but 3x the price

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    For an apparently short range cartridge ,a variable scope of 1 1/4 to 4 power is likely suitable,being lighter in weight and much smaller in bulk,important if you carry it around......on the other hand ,if you will shoot from a stand ,the lesser magnification allows a target to be picked up more easily.............I recall when the 350 LGD came out,there was considerable comment on the different size of shellcase compared to the usual 223 based type of round for the MSR platform......intimating that if the hunting rules changed ,it may become an orphan.....as have so many other Winchester developments since the 80s.

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    Quote Originally Posted by D.Minnich View Post
    ...do you think I made a decent choice for my first gun?
    This is a bit like announcing you just got married, and asking your friends what they think of your wife.

    But… there are very few firearms that I cannot enjoy, find useful and learn from.
    You'll enjoy yours.

    Consider a different approach with scope selection. I've built/sold hundreds of rifles that were top notch - not just for customers, but for family. And my standard choice is a 3x9 40mm for less than $100. They all shoot MOA. After some time on the range and in the field, you'll have a better idea of what features you want. In the mean time the money you save can be put toward ammunition.

    Frequently overlooked is the proper method of mounting a scope. Most gun shops turn this task over to the least qualified gunsmith, and it is seldom done correctly.
    When your rings are in place, "line bore" them so that they are not bending your scope.
    This can be done as easily as gluing emery paper to a proper cylinder and truing the ring alignment.
    It makes a big difference. Then mark the rings so you can reassemble them correctly when you upgrade your scope.

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    Well you don't need crazy long range optics and you don't need to spend anywhere near $1000. A mid range Leupold would serve nicely.

    If you want to squeeze every last minute out of the hunting day, then a big objective is more cost effective than premium coatings on a smaller objective. Simple math. The light gathering area increases by 56% when increasing from a 40 mm to a 50 mm objective. Expensive coatings maybe increase light transmission by 5%. I've made the side by side twilight comparison, and seen my buddy's less expensive 50 mm Leupold beat out my more expensive 40 mm Nikon.

    That said, I don't like carrying the extra bulk and weight. I'll sacrifice the extra couple minutes at each end of the day. But then, I prefer hiking up and down mountains to sitting in a blind. How are you going to hunt?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurt Learning View Post

    When your rings are in place, "line bore" them so that they are not bending your scope.
    This can be done as easily as gluing emery paper to a proper cylinder and truing the ring alignment.
    It makes a big difference. Then mark the rings so you can reassemble them correctly when you upgrade your scope.
    Mount your scope in Burris Signature rings and forget the Line boring. I did that shit 30 years ago. Never more.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NewGunPlumber View Post
    If you hunt in low light and want very good value for money scope have a look at meopta. I have / had a lot of the bigger names nightforce, Leupold, Khales, Swarovski, weaver etc etc and bang for bucks optically and especially in low light I think you'll be really surprised.
    I could not agree more! When it comes to low light hunting the Meopta MeoStar is the gold standard in my book and one heck of a value when compared to other European scopes. I have used my MeoStar R1 for feral hog hunting with just moonlight on an open field. I love the adjustable red dot as well. Definitely a top-tier optic and once you take a look down the tube you will have that ah-ha moment and understand why.

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    I am an air gunner now and I have been very impressed with the Discovery scopes. They are very high quality with really good clear and bright glass. I am currently using a 4-18 FFP model and very happy. If you hunt in low light get a model with a illuminated reticle. These are sub MOA in repeatable accuracy. I recommend a 30mm tube with an objective lens not greater than 44mm, because larger lenses require tall mounting rings. Another advantage these scopes have is that they can focus down to 10 yds. Discovery also has available optional 80mm side focus/parallax wheels all at prices well under $500.

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    As other posters have said, you don't need to spend $1000 and you don't need high magnification. Don't make the rookie mistake of paying for size, power, and bells and whistles that you won't use and, if you don't, will only get in the way. 150 yards would be a long shot in Ohio. If you can hit a pie plate with iron sights at 40 yards, you can easily kill a deer at 150 yards with a 4X scope. A 4X scope with a 32mm objective will give you an exit pupil in the ocular lens of 8mm, which will transmit all the light that your own pupil can take in if fully dilated (which it will never be during hunting hours). No target turrets, and no graduated reticles. If you insist on a variable power scope, go no higher than 3x9. You can use the 9X for sighting the rifle in. Be aware that the higher the power, the smaller the field of view, so there is a trade-off.

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    A 1-4X or 1-6X is all you need. There are plenty of good ones out there now. Too many people overpower the scopes on their rifles. It looks great on the target range when they can see the bullet holes in the target. But out in the field, pull up the rifle and see nothing but deer hair, if you can even find the deer.
    I knew a bow hunter who had no problem shooting with sight pins out to 50 yards, but had a 3-12X on a .35Rem lever action with a 16 1/2" barrel.
    The big mistake is hearing a hunter say that he needs that much power for spotting game, when he should be using a pair of binoculars or a spotting scope. The rifle scope is for aiming the rifle and not for spotting game. I ask them how they would feel if they were in the field and looked across with binoculars and saw someone aiming a rifle at them trying to figure out if they were a deer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NRDock View Post
    Well you don't need crazy long range optics and you don't need to spend anywhere near $1000. A mid range Leupold would serve nicely.

    If you want to squeeze every last minute out of the hunting day, then a big objective is more cost effective than premium coatings on a smaller objective. Simple math. The light gathering area increases by 56% when increasing from a 40 mm to a 50 mm objective. Expensive coatings maybe increase light transmission by 5%. I've made the side by side twilight comparison, and seen my buddy's less expensive 50 mm Leupold beat out my more expensive 40 mm Nikon.

    That said, I don't like carrying the extra bulk and weight. I'll sacrifice the extra couple minutes at each end of the day. But then, I prefer hiking up and down mountains to sitting in a blind. How are you going to hunt?
    Probably a blind or a stand...going with friends that have hunted the area for years. One of them was the one that suggested the 350 legend for my first gun as in his words. Nice gun for the price and a good one to learn on.

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    I really appreaciate all of this great info you guys are sharing

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    Nikon makes a reasonable priced good quality scope.
    What you want is one with decent low light performance.
    1 to 4x or 1 to 6x range isn’t horribly expensive, find one when Midway has a sale going.
    And as already stated good rings scope is only as good as the mounting.
    And spotting scope, and or binoculars for scanning

    As far as caliber choice for woodland or out to 200 yards good old 30 30wcf Kind of hard to beat
    More deer have been taken with it than anything else.
    Your 350 will do the job.
    What you want is reasonably light to carry, and manageable recoil.
    You want good ammo avaliblity

    A used Marlin lever action or Winchester in 30 30 ticks a lot of boxes
    350 appears to tick a few as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurt Learning View Post
    This is a bit like announcing you just got married, and asking your friends what they think of your wife.
    She's okay, once you get past the used part.

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    Redfield!

    They are nothing special. But they work.

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    While a 1-6 WILL work for your needs, what you want is a large enough objective lens that the exit pupil will transmit enough light for you to see in low light conditions, plus it increases your field of view. So, looking for a 1.5-6x42 would be perfect. I have a Meopta MeoStar R1 1.5-6x42 on my .375 H&H. My new favorite pig gun. I did have it on my Browning lever action .308 and it was flawless. The new Optika5 2-10x42 would also get the job done for you and give you a margin of error to really judge the deer you plan to harvest. Just a thought.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bman940 View Post
    While a 1-6 WILL work for your needs, what you want is a large enough objective lens that the exit pupil will transmit enough light for you to see in low light conditions, plus it increases your field of view. So, looking for a 1.5-6x42 would be perfect. I have a Meopta MeoStar R1 1.5-6x42 on my .375 H&H. My new favorite pig gun. I did have it on my Browning lever action .308 and it was flawless. The new Optika5 2-10x42 would also get the job done for you and give you a margin of error to really judge the deer you plan to harvest. Just a thought.
    Cool I think that name was mentioned once before. You in Arkansas? Just wondering because that's where most of the boar are...no? Sorry I am naïve. I dont think we have them in Ohio...Turkey and deer are big here...from what I understand...coarse I may be talking out my ass too...I'll shut up now.

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