OT:rifle scope that you can adjust to your eyeglasses?
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    Default OT:rifle scope that you can adjust to your eyeglasses?

    I'm brain dead this morning and can't think of the right terminology for a rifle scope that you can adjust to your eyeglasses. New glasses and I can't see shit through a scope now.
    Thanks
    i_r_machinist

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    My .50 BMG has a focus ring on it. The other scopes I have just have an adjustment for eye relief (threaded portion with locking collar). I guess it's just called a focus adjustment? I think the collar that focuses your eye to the reticle is called the diopter. It is mounted on the very front of the scope. The collar to adjust target focus on my BMG is the ring farthest away from you.

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    What scope do you have? All mine have the reticle adjustment on the eyepiece end, with a thin locknut, I had to change mine when I upgraded my contacts, and whenever somebody has me test fire their weapon, I adjust theirs... Loosen the locknut, point the scope at a white background on low power, and twist the eyepiece until the reticle is sharp, and lock.

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    Diopter is the word I was looking for. My son and I share guns and he gets real pissy when I start changing the eyepiece and lock. I had bought a Leopold? years ago that had a diopter that was a very thin ring at the eyepiece with a -0+ on the body. It adjusted very quick between our to see sights.
    Thanks for the replies
    ir

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    While the focus ring on your scope will help the problem is your focal point in your glasses is for where you look in everyday activities, not where you look through them to look in your scope
    You can move it around some by using an adjustable cheek piece , lower/higher rings, and getting the scope as far forward as possible.
    Most of my competitor buddies, especially with iron sights, find an eye doctor familiar with shooting and bring the rifle to his office, then figure out where the focal point is , and have the glasses ground for the focal point in that area
    Ask around on accurate shooter forum or the cmp forums for a recommendation in your area

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    Quote Originally Posted by i_r_machinist View Post
    Diopter is the word I was looking for. My son and I share guns and he gets real pissy when I start changing the eyepiece and lock. I had bought a Leopold? years ago that had a diopter that was a very thin ring at the eyepiece with a -0+ on the body. It adjusted very quick between our to see sights.
    Thanks for the replies
    ir
    Changing that "diopter setting" by adjusting the eyepiece changes my point of aim a little on at least some of my scopes. Maybe that is because I do not have premium scopes like a Leopold?

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    Quote Originally Posted by FredC View Post
    Changing that "diopter setting" by adjusting the eyepiece changes my point of aim a little on at least some of my scopes. Maybe that is because I do not have premium scopes like a Leopold?
    Sounds like you need to either adjust the parallax of the scope, or buy a scope with parallax adjustment.

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    Long Eye Relief.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    Long Eye Relief.
    Two separate things, focus and eye-relief.

    Dad and I sorted it by my owning one Balvar-8, he had two. Berween us, we had mounts for the Balvar-8's on six or seven rifles, at one time.

    Not the best scope in the game, but instant swapping meant you never had a BAD one, nor even unfamiliar, either.

    All the positioning was in the mount on those, if you haven't had the experience. Our choice of mostly Kuharsky Bro's or Maynard P. Buehler mounts the rifle was 100% back to usable open sights with the scope off, too.

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    Akajan has one solution, but there may be a less expensive one.

    You do not tell us anything about your prior or current glasses.

    By your profile, you are 59- and at an age where loss of elasticity in your lenses has been making it harder it harder to focus on nearby objects. I am guessing this is not new, has progressed, and your new glasses have progressive lenses. Progressive lenses are ground so that the focal distance varies continuously from the top of the lens to the bottom. To focus at a given distance, you adjust the portion of the lens you look through by tilting your head up or down. The advantage is that there will be a focal length for any common distance. The disadvantage is that the grind of the lenses puts that focal point straight ahead of you. In using a rifle scope you look through the side of the lens, and with a progressive ground lens the image is distorted. Conventional "lined" bifocals are ground with just two focal lengths- but ground such that you can shift your eyes from side to side and the focal point remains the same. These "may" work better for you.

    Go back to where you got the glasses, explain the situation, and see what they say.

    As a competitive shooter I took the route of making arrangements to bring by gun in, and having glasses made with the center of focus for the right eye for using the scope. I can shoot with my regular glasses, but the special glasses do help. If I forget to change back I will eventually have eyestrain in my right eye.

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