Rem 700 action threads truing - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Fellow named Dave Tooley does a little gun work. I read something he wrote about using a mandrel tap/Manson or Kiff truing tool as opposed to conventional truing. I believe the jest of the story was that he couldn’t do it on the lathe with any better measurable result than the tool. If I were a fun smith I’d try one of those setups for real.

    Stopping the lathe before you crash the lug abutments isn’t hard. Go slow. No reason to go to the trouble of a relief. Better yet just square the face and leave the threads alone.

    My amateur opinion.

  2. #22
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    If you want to thread from the inside, you need a relief groove or you have to ramp the cutter in as you're running the threading pass. That seems like an unreasonable thing to do.

    Inside out requires a left handed threading tool, BTW. Unless it's a Norwegian Krag.

    There's at least the length of the bolt lugs for over running. Go slow, 100 RPM or less, and 'pull out' like a man who cares ;-)

    As for a relief groove, the threading tool is the last thing I'd use. I'd want a nice radius on it. A sharp groove is what you add when you WANT something to snap off.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by wesg View Post
    If you want to thread from the inside, you need a relief groove or you have to ramp the cutter in as you're running the threading pass. That seems like an unreasonable thing to do.

    Inside out requires a left handed threading tool, BTW. Unless it's a Norwegian Krag.

    There's at least the length of the bolt lugs for over running. Go slow, 100 RPM or less, and 'pull out' like a man who cares ;-)

    As for a relief groove, the threading tool is the last thing I'd use. I'd want a nice radius on it. A sharp groove is what you add when you WANT something to snap off.



    Thank you very much for your thoughtful response.

    I am with you on using the thread tool. A nice radius is very much preferred. Ramping in also is not doable.

    Internal threading from inside out is not a common practice, I know. But it does have nice advantages. It allows for much faster rpm. Which does improve thread quality. And it does not require tricky hand work. And it is easier on the nerves. Downside is, it requires a relief start groove/ring. This ring may not be problematic on most applications but on a rifle action, it just might.

    I am asking if anyone has knowledge of the strengths of the 4140 steel used in the Rem actions and if its strength would be dangerously compromised if a start ring/relief cut would be made inside the action. And if they do, would they share it.

    Thank you again.

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    If you're on the back side, in reverse (threading from the inside out), the tool has to be right side up. So you need a left handed threading tool. Which makes it a lot easier to see what's going on.

    Feeding in, a standard tool can be used right side up at the front, upside down at the rear. Upside down is quite often used as standard on CNC machines, so the turret doesn't have to move well past centerline of the spindle on a large bore.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wesg View Post
    If you're on the back side, in reverse (threading from the inside out), the tool has to be right side up. So you need a left handed threading tool. Which makes it a lot easier to see what's going on.

    Feeding in, a standard tool can be used right side up at the front, upside down at the rear. Upside down is quite often used as standard on CNC machines, so the turret doesn't have to move well past centerline of the spindle on a large bore.
    Yes, you are right. Unless I am doing it, just thinking about it, I tend to get it backwards.

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    Me too. I had to hold my fingers out and turn them around to make sure ;-)

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    Anyway, once that you learn to cut moving away, it just makes cutting threads so much easier. Other than the set up.

    Internal thread, far side, cutting in reverse, feed out, Right?

    Brother uses a large old tap with all but one tooth removed.
    Last edited by BruceS; 04-23-2020 at 04:00 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Butch Lambert View Post
    I use Warner's HSS inserts. I do not use a thread relief. I disengage the half nut, stop the spindle, and then crank back the cross slide. I make sure that all my receivers have at least a one thread counter bore in the fron ring so the barrel can shoulder up to the front ring.

    I have a few of their inserts. They are nicely ground. I also have their boring bar that holds the inserts. However I am concerned that the boring bar is a little too light. With a hole diameter of about 1 inch, a larger boring bar would be much more rigid. May I ask what boring bar you use and which inserts you use? My inserts are TPMW2-2. The bar is from their Kit #20.

    Btw. I am abandoning the thread from inside out method and am practicing the outside in and kick out method. Not enough information on the loss of strength of having a relief ring inside the action.

    Thank you in advance.

    Regards,
    Tom D.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdarragh View Post
    I have a few of their inserts. They are nicely ground. I also have their boring bar that holds the inserts. However I am concerned that the boring bar is a little too light. With a hole diameter of about 1 inch, a larger boring bar would be much more rigid. May I ask what boring bar you use and which inserts you use? My inserts are TPMW2-2. The bar is from their Kit #20.

    Btw. I am abandoning the thread from inside out method and am practicing the outside in and kick out method. Not enough information on the loss of strength of having a relief ring inside the action.

    Thank you in advance.

    Regards,
    Tom D.



    Tom, I bought my complete, tooled machine shop about 20yrs ago. My friend that owned it was not a gunsmith, but he had a home made boring bar that allows the Warner inserts and the diameter is about .625 in diameter. I only extend it from my tool holder about 1.250" to help with chatter if any. I personally believe that all of this "blueprint" is wasted if you do not have a fitted bolt to the raceways. The late model RR receivers are produced by CNC equipment and are about or better than they can be improved. The only problems with the late RR actions are the bolts are not timed properly and have little to no primary extraction.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceS View Post
    Yes, you are right. Unless I am doing it, just thinking about it, I tend to get it backwards.
    Not true, It ain't gonna work that way, you need the tool to be up-side down and run the lathe in reverse, DOing it your way and running in forward rotation will give you a left hand thread

    If you thread to an indicator for your stop, it's possible to thread to within .005" and you don't nee to go fast with a good insert.

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    Yes, .625 diameter boring bar. Nice. Warner doesn’t make one that big. They suggested getting one custom made for that insert ☹️. Maybe I will make my own sometime also.

    I can grind a nice 60 degree on a 3/16 hss 8% cobalt. The bar is 1/2 inch diameter. I just bought a mini comparator and with it I can check the radius and the 60 degree angle pretty accurately. Hss steel is so simple and easy to deal with on small home shop lathes. The rifle I am working on is an older Rem 700. The gun shot very good till I shot out the throat. Now it’s time to change it up and put on a 6mm Creedmore.

    I have purchased a new bolt from PTG and a handle. So the loose bolt issue is taken care of.

    Thanks very much to you and everyone else who had interest in my questions.

  14. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdarragh View Post
    Yes, .625 diameter boring bar. Nice. Warner doesn’t make one that big. They suggested getting one custom made for that insert ☹️. Maybe I will make my own sometime also.

    I can grind a nice 60 degree on a 3/16 hss 8% cobalt. The bar is 1/2 inch diameter. I just bought a mini comparator and with it I can check the radius and the 60 degree angle pretty accurately. Hss steel is so simple and easy to deal with on small home shop lathes. The rifle I am working on is an older Rem 700. The gun shot very good till I shot out the throat. Now it’s time to change it up and put on a 6mm Creedmore.

    I have purchased a new bolt from PTG and a handle. So the loose bolt issue is taken care of.

    Thanks very much to you and everyone else who had interest in my questions.
    So if you're grinding a radian per even with the current contour; shouldn't the 6th dial increment mean move past that and keep grains chipping until you get to the action?

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    Quote Originally Posted by sw1ne View Post
    So if you're grinding a radian per even with the current contour; shouldn't the 6th dial increment mean move past that and keep grains chipping until you get to the action?

    WTF? Interpret that please. Grinding a radian? Grains chipping?

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    Not you! He said factory ring cut. Was referring to the c[bore in the 98 Mauser

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