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    Default Remington rolling block

    I'm installing a barrel on a Remington rolling block with 12 TPI square threads. Are these truly square threads or is there a small angle on the sides. Any impute would be appreciated.

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    Ken Womack is quite smart about them ol' rolling blocks, give him a ring, helluva nice guy.

    Remington Rolling Block Parts - Rolling Block Parts

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    Yes ,threads are square ,all 90deg angles,and ideally should come up more than hand tight about 3/4 screwed up.

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    Thanks for the replies. With a little digging I found that Brownells sells a tool bit which will save me grinding one.

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    I have cut one square thread for an M1870 Trapdoor Springfield and picked up an M1903 and a Garand thread while rebarreling them. The tools I ground from HSS blanks. Not much different from other grooving or thread tools but they are a true 90° thread form and you do have to hold the dimensions. Give your lead screw and half nuts a very good cleaning before you start. A nominal 60 production thread can wander a tiny bit to and fro on the thread dial, but the square threads have to track pretty much dead nuts. Hey it's what we do. Take your time, feed straight in with the compound, and good luck with them. A blade micrometer is best to check your progress proceeding with light cuts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4575wcf View Post
    I have cut one square thread for an M1870 Trapdoor Springfield and picked up an M1903 and a Garand thread while rebarreling them. The tools I ground from HSS blanks. Not much different from other grooving or thread tools but they are a true 90° thread form and you do have to hold the dimensions. Give your lead screw and half nuts a very good cleaning before you start. A nominal 60 production thread can wander a tiny bit to and fro on the thread dial, but the square threads have to track pretty much dead nuts. Hey it's what we do. Take your time, feed straight in with the compound, and good luck with them. A blade micrometer is best to check your progress proceeding with light cuts.
    It sound like it would be a good idea to use the same number on the dial for each pass.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4575wcf View Post
    I have cut one square thread for an M1870 Trapdoor Springfield and picked up an M1903 and a Garand thread while rebarreling them. The tools I ground from HSS blanks. Not much different from other grooving or thread tools but they are a true 90° thread form and you do have to hold the dimensions. Give your lead screw and half nuts a very good cleaning before you start. A nominal 60 production thread can wander a tiny bit to and fro on the thread dial, but the square threads have to track pretty much dead nuts. Hey it's what we do. Take your time, feed straight in with the compound, and good luck with them. A blade micrometer is best to check your progress proceeding with light cuts.
    A square thread will work on an M1, and many have done it, but it is actually a 10 tpi stub ACME thread. Same with M14. 14-1/2 degrees per side.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kendog View Post
    A square thread will work on an M1, and many have done it, but it is actually a 10 tpi stub ACME thread. Same with M14. 14-1/2 degrees per side.
    Good information thanks. Sometimes things are not what they seem.

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    OK actually measured my rolling block barrel tenon
    0.9675 major dia
    0.924 minor dia
    1.461 overall tenon length
    0.581 turned down to minor dia.
    now there are some details that have to be cut
    best to get a barrel stub from Ken Womack.
    see attached photo
    rollinblockimg_0081.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by 72bwhite View Post
    OK actually measured my rolling block barrel tenon
    0.9675 major dia
    0.924 minor dia
    1.461 overall tenon length
    0.581 turned down to minor dia.
    now there are some details that have to be cut
    best to get a barrel stub from Ken Womack.
    see attached photo
    rollinblockimg_0081.jpg
    Thanks for the info


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