Repair of scope holes
Close
Login to Your Account
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    482
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    Need to repair some scope mount holes that were drilled wrong. I have not seen the rifle yet but I'm told it is a Springfeild 1903A3 is pretty bad shape. The owner wants to fill the present scope holes and then redrill some new ones.
    Question do I use silver solder or TIG weld the old holes closed and then redrill. I'm told the rifle is a real beater and the owner does not want to drop a great deal of money in it. Any suggestions

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Arizona
    Posts
    2,205
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    339

    Post

    TIG is the best way if you are good at it. Heat input is limited both in amount and location and you can heat sink the surrounding metal with a wet rag.

    It might also anneal the case hardening where you need to redrill.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    482
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    GGaskill,

    I can tig weld pretty well, and thought that was the way to go. Did not think about the annealing issue. Thanks. Gear

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    85
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Post

    Find out the serial number and research when it was made. I hade some light welding done on an 03 receiver about 15 years ago before I completed the project I stumbled across the specs of the metal used in the receiver after showing these to a metalurgist he recommenned I not complete and shoot the rifle. Later rifles and I don't remember at what serial number the change was made are suposed to be ok.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    386
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Post

    another method would be to plug the existing holes.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Bozeman, Montana
    Posts
    54
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Post

    I don't necessarily recommend it, but I've moved hole location over by 1/3 of a screw (or less) by threading a screw in with epoxy, cutting off and shaping and then drilling and tapping in the proper location. This must be done carefully! I suspect some of the exotic threadlocker products would work even better than epoxy. Rebluing and other later work could prove problematic with this make do approach.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    1,126
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    89

    Post

    I do not think I would TIG the receiver. We have all read about the low number Springfields and Rock Island rifles that have blown up supposedly due to faulty heat treating practices. I would be afraid that the localized intense heat produced TIG welding would add to any issues that may already be present. Have you ever welded a carbon steel part only to have it break right next to the weld?
    I think using plug screws epoxied in place and then ground off flush would be the best way to deal with the problem.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Arizona
    Posts
    2,205
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    339

    Post

    The low number Springfields and RI's should be retired to mantelpiece duties, not shot. And they shouldn't be used for other projects either (there are better things to do now with Springfields than make custom rifles from them, anyway.) The later nickel steel and double heat treat receivers should not be a problem. But, CAVEAT EMPTOR.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,082
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    13
    Likes (Received)
    295

    Post

    The normal Gunsmith trick is to use epoxy (Marine-Tex, Steel Bed, Acra-Glas)and a plug screw. After it cures then redrill the new hole. Dont get the plug too hot or you will weaken the bond.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Texas Panhandle
    Posts
    61
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Post

    What Ive seen done is the gunsmith put plugs in and then peened the hell out of them. He then filed them close and then used abasive paper to get down to the base metal. after it was polished then blued you couldnt even see where it had been. peening the plug swells the plug into the threads. No heat involved.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •