Rod for suppressor to bore concentricity - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    I thread on the can, look down the bore and call it good if it looks good. Within reason, calipers can be used to check thread/bore concentricity and should squareness.

    Do that, add in some some reasonable assumptions in your trig, and you'll have an idea of where you stand.

    Sent from my SM-G930R4 using Tapatalk

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by garyphansen View Post
    A barrel should be treaded between centers on a lathe. That way the threads are always concentric to the bore.

    Well, Maybe if you turn the OD first to the indicated bore.

  3. #23
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    The way that we do it on the experimental barrels at work is to setup the barrel as if we are chambering it. Dial it in so that the last 3" are running true and parrell. Then crown and thread. When installing the suppressor we use a bore diameter piece of drill rod with polished ends to check alignment. Look for an even amount of space around the rod. We have been doing it this way for over 15years and no problems. If the bullets are marginal on stability, you will get baffle strikes. Check on a target at close range before installing the suppressor if there is any dought.

  4. #24
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    Well it is time for a story. I used to make muzzle brake blanks for a local gun manufacturer. Not sure how they did the barrel set up before threading as I never watched the process. After the threading was complete the drill was to bore the mounted blank brake before removing it for bluing. The gunsmith whose motto was "it all pays the same" forgot to bore one customer's brake, so it had the 1/4 pilot hole and was not bored to the 30 caliber plus it should have been.
    I did not get to see the results just heard about the accident and cause.
    In my minds eye I can just see a rattled customer that will never be able to pull a trigger without flinching.

    For a brake or a suppressor if the barrel is dialed in and the brake or suppressor is bored in place, they will be concentric. Removed and replaced a number of times almost concentric.

  5. #25
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    Well, I liked the part about 'higher end barrels' about the best. 'Cause the Wal-Mart stock gets all the Quality Control Checks! LOL!

    Like as not, the idiot that was pretty sure his daddies tap and die set would work out fine for threading a barrel was the actual culprit.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by MilGunsmith View Post
    The way that we do it on the experimental barrels at work is to setup the barrel as if we are chambering it. Dial it in so that the last 3" are running true and parrell. Then crown and thread. When installing the suppressor we use a bore diameter piece of drill rod with polished ends to check alignment. Look for an even amount of space around the rod. We have been doing it this way for over 15years and no problems. If the bullets are marginal on stability, you will get baffle strikes. Check on a target at close range before installing the suppressor if there is any dought.
    This is pretty much the way I do it. I indicate in the barrel with an indicating rod in the muzzle of the cleaned bore. I want to know where the last 3" of the bore are pointed. By dialing in bores like this, I've discovered how non-concentric some factory barrels are. I've seen factory barrels that are more than 0.015" out of concentricity. Obviously, if you indicated this barrel in on the outside of the barrel, there could be some real problems.

    The rods I use for showing clearance are made by Geissele and Surefire. They run anywhere from $65 to $80 each, more for a .338 rod. They're easily found at Brownells. They have only about 0.002 clearance in the bore. I put the can on, and then slide the alignment check rod in from the breech end. I catch it when it slides out of the can by about an inch, and then examine the annular clearance.

    BTW - I've found some factory barrels aren't straight enough to allow a suppressor alignment rod to pass. So for all the folks who tell me that I'm full of crap for using these methods - there's a reason why I do: measurements of real-world factory rifles. Lack of concentricity. Bores that are not straight. And these problems aren't as rare as we'd like to believe. Cheap AR barrels are especially interesting for lack of bore straightness.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevj View Post
    Well, I liked the part about 'higher end barrels' about the best. 'Cause the Wal-Mart stock gets all the Quality Control Checks! LOL!

    Like as not, the idiot that was pretty sure his daddies tap and die set would work out fine for threading a barrel was the actual culprit.
    You've made 4 posts in this thread and you were a dick with every one. If you know so much and can figure everything out by yourself why are you even a member of this forum? You certainly aren't helping anyone here. The bore alignment rods that we use are made by Geissele and Surefire which are two of the biggest names in the suppressor industry, call them and let them know how stupid they are. I'm sure they'll care about as much as anybody here does.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkblade View Post
    You've made 4 posts in this thread and you were a dick with every one. If you know so much and can figure everything out by yourself why are you even a member of this forum? You certainly aren't helping anyone here. The bore alignment rods that we use are made by Geissele and Surefire which are two of the biggest names in the suppressor industry, call them and let them know how stupid they are. I'm sure they'll care about as much as anybody here does.
    Pot, Kettle, Over.

    LOL!

    WRT being a dick, that is. That's REALLY funny, since it comes from you.

    Call Tiffany's. I am absolutely certain they will make one for you to order, of gold and studded with diamonds, if you wish.
    But the entirety of the specs you need to know, is "Good fit, straight, long enough"

    If you can make one, use what suits you. If you are buying, you get what the company decides is profitable. Usually camouflaged in a whole bunch of meaningless sales weasel talk like Billet, aircraft grade mil-spec, etc.
    Your choice.

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