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    Default Ruger Blackhawk

    New to the forum, first post. Long time lurker though.

    I do primarily work on rifles, threading, chambering, action work. I am not a professional and only do my own thing as a hobbyist. Still lots to learn.

    I am starting to get more interest in revolvers. I read a lot about chamber and forcing come issues with Ruger, primarily in .45 Long Colt. So my question is this: if one has the barrel off of a Blackhawk, say to shorten it or perhaps correct cylinder gap, is there anything wrong with single point cutting the forcing cone as opposed to getting a through the barrel 11 degree reamer?

    Thanks for any reply. I hope to be of positive contribution to the group here, in some small way.

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    Only done one revolver barrel and that was 40 years ago. Did not know that had tools for doing the forcing cone.
    You have it dialed in for threading or other work, it would be natural to single point it and take advantage of the dialing in process. I did it that way once, seems like a hand tool through the barrel would be less accurate unless you have a positive stop. For someone without a lathe the through the barrel maybe it would be the best/only way.
    Last edited by FredC; 03-14-2019 at 09:14 AM.

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    This is best answered on a different website.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gobo View Post
    This is best answered on a different website.
    I'm just curious as to "why?". I thought that this forum was for gunsmithing?

    To the OP - I have a forcing cone reamer around here somewhere that I used on a Ruger Vaquero many years ago and it worked very well. I see no reason that you can't cut the 11 degree into the forcing cone using a lathe. That being said, I would recommend indicating/centering off the inside of the barrel before cutting as the forcing cone might not be concentric to the exterior of the barrel.

    JMHO

    -Ron

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    Thanks for the helpful replies. I too thought that I placed this in the Gunsmithing section. If I missed the mark I apologize to any and all offended.

    Thanks again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gbflyer View Post
    Thanks for the helpful replies. I too thought that I placed this in the Gunsmithing section. If I missed the mark I apologize to any and all offended.

    Thanks again.
    My apology. I did not realize this was in the Gunsmithimg section.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gobo View Post
    My apology. I did not realize this was in the Gunsmithimg section.
    No problem. Have a great day.

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    The only issue I see is getting the new forcing cone concentric with the bore. Most revolver barrels are not simple cylinders and holding will be a challenge.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GGaskill View Post
    The only issue I see is getting the new forcing cone concentric with the bore. Most revolver barrels are not simple cylinders and holding will be a challenge.
    Bore and single point thread a piece of stock to fit the barrel tennon. Turn the outside concentric with the hole. Part off the piece narrow enough that you can get in to the back of the barrel and do your work. Just make sure the diameter is large enough to clear the underlug.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

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    Default Ruger Blackhawk

    Thanks for the setup tip. Iíve been contemplating how to do the work without being in some sort of customized truing fixture, like is made for rifle receivers. Iíve never found that to be a very solid setup but I could easily be wrong. Iíve also thought about dogging the muzzle end on a center and running the steady on the tenon. Probably take a one of a kind threaded, trued collar to get my steady fingers on it and still have room to work. Lots easier with a rifle barrel...maybe not, Iím just more comfortable there.

    Thanks again. Any other real smiths want to share their trade secrets, Iím all Ruger BlackhawkRuger BlackhawkRuger Blackhawkís.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gbflyer View Post
    Thanks for the setup tip. I’ve been contemplating how to do the work without being in some sort of customized truing fixture, like is made for rifle receivers. I’ve never found that to be a very solid setup but I could easily be wrong. I’ve also thought about dogging the muzzle end on a center and running the steady on the tenon. Probably take a one of a kind threaded, trued collar to get my steady fingers on it and still have room to work. Lots easier with a rifle barrel...maybe not, I’m just more comfortable there.

    Thanks again. Any other real smiths want to share their trade secrets, I’m all Ruger BlackhawkRuger BlackhawkRuger Blackhawk’s.
    I mostly do rifle work but dabble in most anything gun related... I rebarrelled a 357 Blackhawk for a friend a couple years ago and did single point the forcing cone/throat. Since I had contoured the bbl between centers and knew all was concentric and right with the world, I chucked the barrel in my action fixture and linearly centered the bore, then cut the throat. If proof is in the puddin that revolver has shot a cylinder full into less than 3" at 100 yards. If you're doing a 45, I would consider the Taylor throat where you bore a parallel throat deep enough to remove the rifling then your standard throat. This will remove any constriction due to the thin wall and thread tenon and is supposed to be the ticket, or at least pretty good option. You may only want to do that after installing the barrel to proper torque and slugging from the muzzle to see if there is a constriction under the threads.

    On the revolver I worked on, I also faced the frame in the lathe as it was not even close to square. For that I chucked up a scrap barrel stub, turned and threaded a snug tenon, and installed the frame with a spacer in the cylinder space. Single point faced the frame for a few thou over barrel diameter to allow a square seat. Made a difference I could feel when snapping the barrel on by hand.


    Next up I have a couple 45lc Rugers and I want to make or find a 5 shot cylinder for one and do a full build. Line bore, barrel, Bisley frame, etc...

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    Quote Originally Posted by msalm View Post
    I mostly do rifle work but dabble in most anything gun related... I rebarrelled a 357 Blackhawk for a friend a couple years ago and did single point the forcing cone/throat. Since I had contoured the bbl between centers and knew all was concentric and right with the world, I chucked the barrel in my action fixture and linearly centered the bore, then cut the throat. If proof is in the puddin that revolver has shot a cylinder full into less than 3" at 100 yards. If you're doing a 45, I would consider the Taylor throat where you bore a parallel throat deep enough to remove the rifling then your standard throat. This will remove any constriction due to the thin wall and thread tenon and is supposed to be the ticket, or at least pretty good option. You may only want to do that after installing the barrel to proper torque and slugging from the muzzle to see if there is a constriction under the threads.

    On the revolver I worked on, I also faced the frame in the lathe as it was not even close to square. For that I chucked up a scrap barrel stub, turned and threaded a snug tenon, and installed the frame with a spacer in the cylinder space. Single point faced the frame for a few thou over barrel diameter to allow a square seat. Made a difference I could feel when snapping the barrel on by hand.


    Next up I have a couple 45lc Rugers and I want to make or find a 5 shot cylinder for one and do a full build. Line bore, barrel, Bisley frame, etc...
    That sounds like a fun project. Thanks for the reply.


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