Ultrasonic Cleaner Advise
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  1. #1
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    Dec 2008
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    Default Ultrasonic Cleaner Advise

    Hi Gent's, I work full time as a gunsmith and do a lot of work on older rifles rebarrelling and rebuilding. I was thinking about getting a good ultrasonic cleaner to enable me to clean actions and assemblies before starting work on them and was wondering whether the guys have got them are finding them a valuable addition to the shop?
    I thought they may be good for cleaning modern trigger assemblies without disassembly and other sub-assemblies that need cleaning but don't benefit from disassembly?
    Also thought they could do a good job of cleaning up the filthy internals of stripped bolt bodies, action threads, and cut down on use of solvents.
    The unit I'm looking at is around $1500 so I don't want to spend the dough if I'm kidding myself on the capabilities.
    Your thoughts would be appreciated.
    Cheers
    Tom

  2. #2
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    Jun 2015
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    I've used them for many things in machine rebuilding but not gunsmithing. Only thing I can suggest is to make sure you're getting a low frequency one. I'm not completely sure how low they go, but a 40K HZ unit is going to work better for this then say an 80K HZ unit. The lower the frequency the better for heavier soiled cleaning. High frequency units I believe are used more on circuit boards and things like that.

  3. #3
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    Aug 2011
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    I bought a low priced heated ultrasonic cleaner big enough for 1911's. For my Ruger Mk III I take the grips off and run it with Ed's Red at about 170 degrees for 1/2 hour. So far that's all the cleaning I've done with that pistol in thousands of rounds. The Ed's I mixed up has lanolin in it which is incredibly slippery and corrosion resistant. I've used it to clean filthy antique pistols as well

  4. #4
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    I have owned and used numerous ones in the machine shop, cleaning up plastic injection molds, and with the correct cleaner they do an amazing job. One warning though, make sure you dry and oil everything because I have seen steel items cleaned in these go totally rusty if something wasn't done fairly quickly. Overnite was WAY too long to wait for rust inhibitor of some sort. Bought my last one used off of eBay and it was a brute, you could clean an engine block with it. Cost me about $1000 to buy it but almost that much again for shipping.

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