1995 HAAS VF-OE Newbie Basics Questions - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 27 of 27
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Mich, USA
    Posts
    149
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    81
    Likes (Received)
    25

    Default

    Hmmmm Interesting question. others probably know more on CNC based gear but from my EET Repair days, things like keeping the air filters replaced on schedule to ensure fresh clean air moving to keep things cool. Ensure all fans are working optimally. Some will squeak and buzz and turn slower than spec. AC monitoring of power from time to time, proper 3 phase V-in on the transformer in. Checking the low-voltage power supply's , Line conditioners on the AC in. Always where a static write strap when you take PCB's in/out. check and recheck after maintenance. The usual's (from my old repair days).

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Southwest, USA
    Posts
    658
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    30
    Likes (Received)
    152

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by countryguy View Post
    BGL.. Same boat here. 98 VF/4 that we've rebuilt and loved-on and she's really close. Y is 2tens backlash. X is nearly a Thou+ cold. When you say thrust bearings, are you referring to the ones on the ball screws that I've read can be a possible culprit for excessive lash? And where did you get them. Haas wanted $600 bucks when I check w/ the HFO (plus a core). I cannot recall the exact part name they used.
    The thrust bearing is the bearing pack that supports the ball screw on the motor side. Usually when the thrust bearing starts to fail, you will notice that the axis will get a loud(ish) growl type noise when it rapids; this noise level will increase as the damaged bearings get worse. They can be rebuilt, hence the core return, but I have never done one myself.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Southwest, USA
    Posts
    658
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    30
    Likes (Received)
    152

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TeaJunky View Post
    Can I ask is there anything that can be done to backup safeguard the actual control itself I am not talking about parameter,settings etc they are already backed up. If you have a control pcb failure are there any options then. May be there is no need to be concerned about it? Thanks
    Unfortunately, there is no way to backup the control itself. In the event of a system failure, the only thing to do would be to reload the machine software (dealer has this) and use your back up files for parameters, setting, etc to get you back up and running. You would need assistance from your dealer is all. I don't remember the exact years, but the earliest machines had the software embedded on the pcb and was not re-loadable in the field.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    1,124
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    8
    Likes (Received)
    284

    Default

    Tom,

    Regarding backups...

    I number of years ago, I bought a used 2006 Hass (SMM). When I first powered up the machine and everything was functioning as it should, I aimed my cellphone camera at the screen, and shot a video as I stepped through every parameter and setting page on the control.

    As luck would have it, a year or two later I had a Haas tech here to install an expansion board (more mem, ethernet, USB), which he never managed to get working. Along the way of all his attempts, he updated the operating system one or two versions, blah blah. By the end of the day, I still didn't have the interface board working, but the machine was at least back together and function fine (or so I thought). My machine happens to have the 15k spindle, so a few days later I had a job where I was using something well over 10k rpm. The machine would only go to 10k. I tried everything... looked through all the parameters, double/triple checked all the settings (at least the ones that seemed obviously related to spindle rpm). I ended up having quite a number of phone calls with the HFO, and they had me try all sorts of things. No luck... spindle would only go to 10k.

    Finally, I remembered that I had the video I shot of the control screen, and I methodically went through everything. 3 parameters ended up being different, which I changed and immediately had my 15k back. Not sure how much longer I would have gone on with the HFO, trying everything they suggested, but I fixed it in 10 minutes once I watched my video.

    sidenote: it turns out that there are a few parameters in the Haas control (relating to the spindle in my particular machine) that are "derived" (calculated) parameters. In the process of updating the system software, the Haas tech had done something incorrect during backup and restore and a few parameters were not set to the correct value. Interestingly, the parameters were not something that were "obviously" spindle-related.

    Well... extra long story, but point being: 5 or 10 minutes to shoot a video of every single parameter page got me the information required to fix the machine -- and that information was NOT in a backup.

    fwiw..

    PM

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    ca, US
    Posts
    265
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    74

    Default

    The early machines (at least my '91 VF-1) uses needle thrust bearings. The later machines went to angular contact bearings which are more precise. The needles on my Y axis disintegrated and the cage was wearing a groove through the ball shaft.
    Needle thrust bearings are always sliding somewhere along the rollers so only make sense where space is a premium.
    The whole thrust bearing assemebly can be replaced with the later angular contact bearing version. The bearings themselves are expensive but will last much longer without destroying the ball shaft when they wear out.
    Angular bearings (also used in the spindle) need to be preloaded. Cheaper if you get the bearing cage from Haas then buy the bearings from a bearing supply.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Staten Island NewYork USA
    Posts
    3,687
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1073
    Likes (Received)
    1755

    Default

    I'm a little late to the party...

    But having old and new Haas machines on my floor, I can safely say you can make great parts with these older machines.

    Rapids will only go as fast as they can...makes no difference in programming or part quality...just takes a little longer for machine to locate.

    Slower then programmed spindle speed will have spindle limit out at its max, even though programmed faster...issue there is the feed should be reduced to compensate as your feed per tooth will increase. That can overload the tooth and break tool OR loose some accuracy/finish...or if close make no difference.

    As to trying to bring an old machine up to new machine options and specs... Don't waste your money. Learn how to make parts with the machine as it was made to run...make some money, save and put towards a newer machine.

    To the rotary- - Haas is plug and play at the control with Haas rotaries. Haas has some nice mapping cylces and get you making stuff quick. If you go with another brand...you write a separate program for the seperate rotary control and with the Haas M code you tell the rotary when to run its thing, then rotary tells the Haas its done and continues with balance of program. Running the 4th together with the Haas is done by programming in time AND trying to get both times to sync exactly. Can be done...but much easier to plug in a Haas rotary and having the Haas do it all on its own.

    No need to unlock HSM...the older machines do not have it. However you can work around by using the theory and applying at slower speeds. Yes it takes a bit longer...but HSM is great for less then ridged setups and another way around is taking lighter cuts...BUT DEEPER cuts. I had hour long programs running a 1/2" endmill at 1-3/4 depth of cut in 316L SS taking lil .065 cuts, hogged 30lb blocks into a 5lb part. I got about 8 parts per endmill before the load meter started climbing. Not fast...but it worked well and very consistent.

    Haas, use'm the way they were meant and they make good parts and last a good long while...push beyond and well you will quickly see the machines shortcomings.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    26
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Default

    I have 2 older haas mills as well. Like everyone else said, A probe system starts around $5000 on Haas' website. I would imagine if it would even be possible to add it it would be more expensive than that and likely more than you paid for the machine. I am a 100% advocate for the haimer. I also use a $70 2" dial tool touch off setter from ebay. I call up a sub program from MDI that touches off the tip of the haimer. I zero the operator Z axis where the tool setter zero is, and I touch the top of the part. Whatever value is in the Z operator column is the workshift Z value. As long as you touch your tools off of the same plane, everything works great.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •