Anyone recall the CoProcessor & Mhz used w/ the 68030 boards? (late 1990s vintage)
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    Default Anyone recall the CoProcessor & Mhz used w/ the 68030 boards? (late 1990s vintage)

    Really quick

    I think it would be a Motorola 68882 in the jlead(?) (pop in type!)
    But in a 16, 20, 25, and 33Mhz version?

    Going to play soon!

    PS- Anyone have the CoProcessor PROM BIN files for 9.64 or 10 anything? This can be from the PROM on the board or a /BIN file on a disk or usb/floppy file (as the PROM is electrically erasable and reloadable) if you know how to do all that.
    Last edited by countryguy; 02-27-2021 at 09:21 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by countryguy View Post
    Really quick

    I think it would be a Motorola 68882 in the jlead(?) (pop in type!)
    But in a 16, 20, 25, and 33Mhz version?

    Going to play soon!

    PS- Anyone have the CoProcessor included BIN files for 9.64 or 10 anything?
    I've done a quick search, but can not find much. Did find this reference to a twin processor setup:

    "In fact: its closest cousin is a Macintosh. Haas uses a proprietary board and uses twin Motorola 68030 processors. They were last used in a Macintosh around 1993-1994 in the Mac II line."

    but don't know if that's accurate.

    There's this PM thread: Tried and True Machine

    Post #680 has some info, but maybe not of help to you.

    Edit: Just noticed it's the CoP data you were looking for, so even of less use...

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    Yes, it was the 68882.

    IIRC the 68881 was first used with the 68000. Both are pin compatible and pretty much code compatible.

    This from memories of the HP 9000-220, 320 and 330 machines. Wrote some bloody fast code with those.

    Curiously, the 6888x had 80bit wide registers, whereas the onboard FPU of the later 68040 processors was only 64 bits wide. That really messed up some of my (9th order polynomial) thermocouple voltage-to-temperature calculations when we upgraded to the later machines...
    Last edited by Mark Rand; 02-28-2021 at 04:25 AM. Reason: typos!

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    But Doc, you did get Marty ................Back to the Future! All good!

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rand View Post
    Yes, it was the 68882.

    IIRC the 68881 was used with the first used with the 68000. Both are pin compatible and pretty much code compatible.

    This from memories of the HP 9000-220, 320 and 330 machines. Wrote some bloody fast code with those.

    Curiously, the 6888x had 80bit wide registers, whereas the onboard FPU of the later 68040 processors was only 64 bits wide. That really messed up some of my (9th order polynomial) thermocouple voltage-to-teperature calculations when we upgraded to the later machines...

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    Why?.......

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Why?.......
    LOL! "Why" indeed! I recall that for a time the 68XXX was billed as "the world's fastest Zed-80". As an emulator!

    Or gobsmaking the Intel & AMD laddies with server after server's worth of lowly Via C3 or C6..... because the frugal, but clever, little fellow had an on-die hardware encryption engine that OpenBSD knew how to utilize effectively .. and 100% of the connectivity, management side or one hop off HKIX facing the public.... was encrypted!

    And the budget only supported uplinks, local B/W, and cross borders/ocean b/w that would saturate before even a C3 was overly stressed running a(ny) "industrial strength *.BSD's with the "power to SERVE".

    Meanwile? Amateur-hour Linsux got hard-pressed? It just started dropping packets!

    "Progress" .... is exactly what it says it is.

    "Can't save 'em all" applies to old dirty beach sand.. same as it applies to Old Iron.

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    Back to the math at hand.... I'm going to order the 20Mhz 68882 (done. 4 for $40). and try it. I have the appropriate support files and we'll just see where it all goes. Told 8.x was DB brush. 9.x was the AC Servo and newer PCB set that evolved w/ iterations and maturity on those 90's ACServo systems. Then into 10.x for later equiepment types/revisions and option$$. Full HSM, 5 axis. MORE CODE$$$$$ :-) Who knows.. will be happy when it's not my only love.
    outta here and done on this but thank for the contrib's always welcome. CG out.

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    Here is the spec on the 68882 under $3 and tens of tens of thousands out there. and.. I have a few 20's now that I guess I'll send to the IC bin. I recently pulled out a 286 and finally chucked it! random mem: Used to work with the 6800, 6805, 6850 and 6821's if those ring any bells out yonder. Anyone else remember hand coding via CPU OpX (instruction) paper cards? then into the first 8bit assy programmers & PROM burners(apple II based). //ABORT//- --termination of memory routine-- interrupt sig processed. Return to COVID (yeah... bored!) .

    Motorola MC68882FN40A FPU 40Mhz PLCC 68-pin.


    Quote Originally Posted by countryguy View Post
    Back to the math at hand.... I'm going to order the 20Mhz 68882 (done. 4 for $40). and try it. I have the appropriate support files and we'll just see where it all goes. Told 8.x was DB brush. 9.x was the AC Servo and newer PCB set that evolved w/ iterations and maturity on those 90's ACServo systems. Then into 10.x for later equiepment types/revisions and option$$. Full HSM, 5 axis. MORE CODE$$$$$ :-) Who knows.. will be happy when it's not my only love.
    outta here and done on this but thank for the contrib's always welcome. CG out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rand View Post
    That really messed up some of my (9th order polynomial) thermocouple voltage-to-temperature calculations when we upgraded to the later machines...
    I hate when that happens!


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