Turning on a Haas mill
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  1. #1
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    Default Turning on a Haas mill

    Hi

    Some time ago I came across a post where someone was using his Haas mill as a lathe. Material in the spindle/collet and turning tools clamped inside the vise.
    Sometimes when the lathe is busy I need to quickly turn some parts and I would like to do it on the mill.
    This guy had a post (fusion360) for it. But I can't seem to find it anymore.

    But maybe the standard Haas lathe post works also in the mill? (except for some lathe specific things). It's the same control after all.

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    I have done that exercise with my Deckel FP2NC with the horizontal spindle. It sort of makes it a sliding headstock lathe (Swiss) without the bushing. I hand code it, and find it can be hard at first to wrap my head around the coordinate system. The work is the cutter and the cutter is the work. I park a small compound rest on the table to hold the tool and enable small tweaks to position. This is small-diameter work held in an ER-16 collet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tcncj View Post
    ...But maybe the standard Haas lathe post works also in the mill? (except for some lathe specific things). It's the same control after all.
    I wouldn't use a lathe post without a lot of editing. For such simple work I would just write out the prog by hand.

    You will need to know your tool holder geometry when you put it in a vise to get Y zero center of spindle.

    X will be programmed as a radius value rather than a diameter, Z minus will still be Z minus (make sure you have clearance), and your arcs will be in G18.

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    Thanks for the replies
    I found some more information about it.
    Apparently you assign a WCS for each tool and zero it.
    So X and Y positions are set. Then you set Z with your stock into the toolholder.
    This requires a minimal change of code. I will try it next week and let you know how it works out.

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    I do this in my mill with a 16 station gang block. I use a standard 2 axis lathe post, and use a G65 (scale factor) of X .5 so you can direct program. Each tool calls up a different work offset to change positions on the gang block. works a treat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BSCustoms View Post
    I do this in my mill with a 16 station gang block. I use a standard 2 axis lathe post, and use a G65 (scale factor) of X .5 so you can direct program. Each tool calls up a different work offset to change positions on the gang block. works a treat.
    Same, but with a post I customized. And in case you haven't realized, you have an automatic part changer. I could load up 40 pieces of stock in toolholders and let'er buck.


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