What is the name of the large diameter head 1/4-20 screws Haas puts everywhere?
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  1. #1
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    Default What is the name of the large diameter head 1/4-20 screws Haas puts everywhere?

    They are somewhat larger than a panhead with a 5/32 allen that likes to strip out.
    I am in need of a small bucket full

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    Button Head?

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    Flange button head: McMaster-Carr

    BTW, what you want is a Torx drive rather than the F'in hex drive. I found some in a stainless steel security style, but I'd rather get them in good 'ol sorta grade 8.

    Group buy, anyone? Get a few 100K made so we can banish the unspeakable hex drives to hell?

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    There's lots of different types of fasteners, could you include a photo or sketch? Button head was my first thought also. Any type of shoulder on the fastener? Flange button head as suggested above is another candidate.

    OBTW- Torx sux and sometimes I'd prefer a hex drive. Particularly when the drive rounds out. JMO

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post

    Group buy, anyone? Get a few 100K made so we can banish the unspeakable hex drives to hell?
    Problem is, you would want them in 1/4-20, me 5/16-18, digger doug 15/64 - 23 1/4 ..........

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChipSplitter View Post
    Problem is, you would want them in 1/4-20, me 5/16-18, digger doug 15/64 - 23 1/4 ..........
    Wuts the issue? Put a taper-thread on the screw, good for 0-80 to 1-8 as long as you have the drive torque...

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    Quote Originally Posted by AD Design View Post
    There's lots of different types of fasteners, could you include a photo or sketch? Button head was my first thought also. Any type of shoulder on the fastener? Flange button head as suggested above is another candidate.

    OBTW- Torx sux and sometimes I'd prefer a hex drive. Particularly when the drive rounds out. JMO
    Here is a pic, flanged button as said above, thanks guys. I'll call McMaster
    img_7525.jpg

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    Soft piece of crap screws


    I hit my tech up for a few of them...funny how they need to carry extras.

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    Here's the technique I used when I was frequently loosening these types of fasteners:

    Clean out the hex thoroughly
    Give the fastener a few taps with a hammer
    Use a new condition, quality (Bondhus or?) Hex wrench
    Seat wrench fully, engage the hex lightly
    Give a quick full force 'snap' to break them loose. Do not slowly apply more Torque.

    This worked for me a very high percentage of times. Before I started using this technique, the hex would strip out frequently.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BROTHERFRANK View Post
    Here's the technique I used when I was frequently loosening these types of fasteners:

    Clean out the hex thoroughly
    Give the fastener a few taps with a hammer
    Use a new condition, quality (Bondhus or?) Hex wrench
    Seat wrench fully, engage the hex lightly
    Give a quick full force 'snap' to break them loose. Do not slowly apply more Torque.

    This worked for me a very high percentage of times. Before I started using this technique, the hex would strip out frequently.
    I have had good luck with this as well but the tech I had last ( a couple of years back ) screwed up a bunch when he had the head cover off then put them back with his impact driver. I have a flunky switch in there now and need to see why so I want new ones to put back.

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    Button head screws suck. When they strip out, SOP is to slot them with a cutoff wheel and Mototool, then use a big screwdriver.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BROTHERFRANK View Post
    Here's the technique I used when I was frequently loosening these types of fasteners:

    Clean out the hex thoroughly
    Give the fastener a few taps with a hammer
    Use a new condition, quality (Bondhus or?) Hex wrench
    Seat wrench fully, engage the hex lightly
    Give a quick full force 'snap' to break them loose. Do not slowly apply more Torque.

    This worked for me a very high percentage of times. Before I started using this technique, the hex would strip out frequently.
    -To elaborate a bit on BROTHERFRANK's technique (for those unfamiliar with it) the idea is to collapse a small bit of material from the fastener head into the socket on all six sides. Can be done with either a good drive punch, center punch, or any type of staking tool. From there, take a shortish straight section of the original hex key size and broach it into the now partially collapsed socket. Either use this as is or remove it to use a standard hex key for removing the fastener. This can, and sometimes has to be, done more than once to get enough material to "bite" the hex key but it beats drilling them out when on a dinner table size stamping die. It's very much a "feel" operation as too enthusiastic an application can/will result in excessive material upset into the socket to get the hex key into. I used this technique for many years on large stamping dies that were repeatedly disassembled for routine maintenance. There was often a few SHCS is the c'bored die shoe that "rounded". Hope this helped someone.

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    Can you get a bite on those with a sharp pair of side cutting pliers, one jaw in the hex and one on the OD? I've done lots of standard buttonheads that way, push in bite on and turn.

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