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  1. #1
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    Default The next time you fly.......

    Next time on an airplane with nothing to keep you busy think about this. But do not panic!
    Aviation’s Crazy, Mixed Up Units of Measure – AeroSavvy

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  3. #2
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    It's been an issue for many years. See the case of the Gimli Glider Gimli Glider - Wikipedia. I believe the root cause was that they called for a fuel load in kilograms but were given only that many pounds, thus giving them less than half the fuel they needed.

    However, we are slowly creeping toward metric. I remember routinely getting weather reports with wind speed in m/s, pressure in mB, and temps in degrees C. That was 12 years ago and inside the US. With the move to more modern navigation like ADS-B, a metric switch might be a bit easier.

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  5. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    It's been an issue for many years. See the case of the Gimli Glider Gimli Glider - Wikipedia. I believe the root cause was that they called for a fuel load in kilograms but were given only that many pounds, thus giving them less than half the fuel they needed.

    However, we are slowly creeping toward metric. I remember routinely getting weather reports with wind speed in m/s, pressure in mB, and temps in degrees C. That was 12 years ago and inside the US. With the move to more modern navigation like ADS-B, a metric switch might be a bit easier.
    When I was still current, surface temps and distances, Terminal Control Areas, were in degrees F and statute miles, aloft & enroute in degrees C and nautical miles. With airspeed in Knots, it wasn't a big deal. Metric, BTW, is a force-fit that doesn't fit. As usual.

    Fuel for light civilian aircraft was in US gallons. "A few" years earlier, ground controlling "century series" fighter-interceptors (F100, 101, 102, 106) fuel was in pounds, Avoir. Anything works, here, so long as one knows WHICH.

    The point?

    It used to be gnarlier, yet, than it is now!

    And that was just for the USA!

    PS: Any pilot as didn't realize he was short-fueled OR over-fueled should be demoted to rear-seat navigator, single-engine rubber sandals, fixed-gear, and taxiing only at that.

    "Grounded". IOW, and before an aircraft does it for him. The hard way.


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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    It's been an issue for many years. See the case of the Gimli Glider Gimli Glider - Wikipedia. I believe the root cause was that they called for a fuel load in kilograms but were given only that many pounds, thus giving them less than half the fuel they needed.

    However, we are slowly creeping toward metric. I remember routinely getting weather reports with wind speed in m/s, pressure in mB, and temps in degrees C. That was 12 years ago and inside the US. With the move to more modern navigation like ADS-B, a metric switch might be a bit easier.
    I raced motorcycles at Gimli. Track was rough but the people we met were great.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ewlsey View Post
    It's been an issue for many years. See the case of the Gimli Glider Gimli Glider - Wikipedia. I believe the root cause was that they called for a fuel load in kilograms but were given only that many pounds, thus giving them less than half the fuel they needed.

    However, we are slowly creeping toward metric. I remember routinely getting weather reports with wind speed in m/s, pressure in mB, and temps in degrees C. That was 12 years ago and inside the US. With the move to more modern navigation like ADS-B, a metric switch might be a bit easier.
    Are you saying we are slowly inching toward the metric system?

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    That was an interesting read, thanks, I won't be flying anytime soon I suppose, but then next time I do, this will definitely be on my mind.

  10. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by boat_lane View Post
    That was an interesting read, thanks, I won't be flying anytime soon I suppose, but then next time I do, this will definitely be on my mind.
    Just don't take any cruises...

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    "As the plane drew near the runway, it became apparent that the aircraft was coming in too high and fast, raising the danger of the 767 running off the runway before it could be stopped. The lack of hydraulic pressure prevented flap/slat extension that would have, under normal landing conditions, reduced the stall speed of the aircraft and increased the lift coefficient of the wings to allow the airliner to be slowed for a safe landing. The pilots briefly considered a 360-degree turn to reduce speed and altitude, but they decided that they did not have enough altitude for the manoeuvre. Pearson decided to execute a forward slip to increase drag and lose altitude. This manoeuvre is commonly used in gliders and light aircraft to descend more quickly without increasing forward speed, but it is practically never executed in large jet airliners outside of rare circumstances like those of this flight. "


    He slipped a 767...god love him....

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  13. #9
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    thats pretty amazing, a good read, thanks. what's almost as amazing is that they flew it out TWO DAYS later, after "minor repairs"!

  14. #10
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    I've seen this before of course (having done a private cert) - but it looks like the missed some of the best ones. The formal handbooks give rules of thumb for things like temperature change with altitude, and it's in °C per 1,000 feet. Like measuring torque with Kilogram-feet or newton-inches. Works fine, just kind of weird....

  15. #11
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    I know, from my delving into the rabbit hole of old watches, that Metric was legal for use in Trade in the US of A, a lot earlier than the 1975 date given, like by a matter of a century or so.

    What wasn't measured in decimal millimeters in a watch, was likely defined in Lignes. So not inches either. This at a time when the US was at the forefront, exporting quality watches to the world.

    Legal for trade, and widely accepted, not always the same thing, though.

    The Canuckstanian Gubbermint tried to eradicate the inch back in the 1970's as well, and rapidly found themselves sticking both Inch and Milimetric measurements in to the curriculum, as the trade schools were finding that the students needed (lets all make a surprised face!) to know how to deal with the existing weights and measures in the world that was essentially laid out in not-metric.


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