Where do i post questions regarding beginner advice and startup?
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  1. #1
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    Default Where do i post questions regarding beginner advice and startup?

    I'm 16 and looking to start machining as a hobby, where do I post questions about startup?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacobmartin View Post
    I'm 16 and looking to start machining as a hobby, where do I post questions about startup?
    .
    1st do not mention hobby questions. as the forum moderators only want professional machinist questions asking about hobby machining will get the discussion thread closed.
    .
    if you ask a question without mentioning it is for a hobby you probably will get someone to answer a question or if asking for advice on something you will probably get an answer.
    .
    not sure what you mean by startup ? startup a machine? startup a shop? startup a business?
    .
    if asking about machines for a shop do not ask about hobby machines as that will get thread locked too. professional machines can be expensive although older used machines sometimes are available for a reasonable price they might need some repairs though.

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    It would not be wise or safe for you to attempt anything based on answers you might get from this board.

    I recommend a formal instructional class such as one found in high school or junior college to learn the basics and to work under a journeyman for a time.

    You can start with a book “How to run a Lathe”

    South Bend has one that is considered best.

    You should learn safety, turning, facing, drilling, boring, tapping, turning taper, turning step diameters and length, setteng tool bit position and angle, sharpening tool bits, threading with a self ground tool bit for ID and OD threads, turning acme threads (Id and OD) with a self ground tool bit. use of 3jaw 4jaw and face plate, using live and dead centers, setting tailstock center position, measuring work with micrometers, measuring calipers, hand calipers, measuring with scales, understand thread sizes for size and fit, reamer size and fit, reading and drawing part sketches, and probably many other things that I failed to mention, all from *reading the book, *instruction and *practice on the machine.


    Basically start at the beginning of the book and master or at least practice each function described.

    Buck

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    Jacob;

    PM has a strange way of welcoming people. Now that you have been taught never to use the "H word", you can proceed onto the real questions. I think, for people to give you good advice,
    it would be helpful if you let us know what it is you want to make with metal, what tools you have(or have access to), and any experience you may have already i.e. do you have
    shop classes at school? Do you know any machinists, amateur or otherwise.

    It is probably best if a person can show you the basics of machining in person, but for me, that was never practical, so I learned by trial and error(lots of error).

    A lot of basic tools can be had for small money used (measuring, marking, files, hacksaw...).

    Machines can be expensive, though again older machines can sometimes be had for not too much.

    As you may know, the basic machines are lathe, milling machine, drill press, bandsaw.

    Tell us more about what you want to do, and people will probably be able to point you in the right direction.

    regards, and good luck,

    Jon P.

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    Being a machinist is not a 'hobby,' it is an art form, a curse, and a way of life. Only when you can't look at a piece of metal without visualizing how it was made, and how you could do it better, can you call yourself a machinist. If you truly wish to start yourself down this path of driving everyone around you insane, I recommend starting by getting a part time job at a local machine shop and watching what they do. Old machinists are always eager to show off their skills to noobs. You can best learn by being there. In the mean time, start with a saw and a file and a block of something, and see how it works. In the mean time, read books and watch videos on the interwebs, MACHINE SHOP TIPS tubalcain playlist - YouTube is a good place to start.

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    I'll add my .02 here also. Try to get a high school machine shop textbook from the 40s-60s ,it will give you the basics in everything from use of hand tools to operation of most shop equipment. I took a machine shop class in '60 and still have the text ,and still on occasion use it for some info. A Machinery Handbook is also a good item ,older is better for a beginner as it has more info on manual equipment. And by the way wellcome, we need young blood.

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    Add my welcome to the others.
    When entering any new forum, it's best to read, read, read to get an idea of the "personality" of a site. Doing so, you'll discover the "h-word" rules, who are the voices of reason, who are here to stir things up a bit, etc. But in the end, it will be educational. You'll discover how to do things right, as well as how not to do them -- and you'll discover that both those bits of information have equal value.

    For a good example of the wealth of information that can be available here, study this thread from the beginning: http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...cision-260814/

    There are, of course, other websites out there that do cater to the hobby machinist. Some are good, some are not so good. They may even have an opinion about the participants, content, focus, and management of this site. The great thing is you can read them all, separate the good from the bad, and do so without tipping your hand as to your age and experience level -- because you largely don't even have to register or log in to read them.

    And finally, these vBulletin-based forums all have weaknesses in the 'search' function. For best results, use Google to search the site. For example, enter this whole next line in Google's search box:

    site:www.practicalmachinist.com accuracy vs. precision

    and next...

    site:www.practicalmachinist.com "accuracy vs. precision"

    to see how well Google sifts thru common terms to find exactly what you're after, and for a concise listing of posts discussing this important topic. (Google's help section will have info on the quotes vs. no-quotes details.)

    Good luck, man, and happy reading.
    (Note that the site is currently having some external interference, so raise your AdBlock Plus and NoScript shields for awhile. Lower them when the coast is clear, because legit ad revenue is what keeps this site free to use...)

    Chip

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    Guys can you please list a few good books where I can start with. I am looking to learn CNC inside out. (Starting from outside&#128521 I would appreciate if you can suggest a book on toolings.

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    http://www.productivity.com/content/...g%20Manual.pdf
    for learning g code and general programming mill


    http://www.productivity.com/content/...r%20Manual.pdf
    For learning how the machine functions mill

    http://www.productivity.com/content/...r%20Manual.pdf
    Lathe programming

    http://www.productivity.com/content/...g%20Manual.pdf
    haas lathe operation

    There free and offer a great deal of knowledge that can be applied to other machines.

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    The nr 1 question is .. what do You have to spend ?
    Do you have a place to put and use tooling and stuff ?

    If you have some funds, its relatively easy to get some tools and get started.
    Ie most people have or can get a grand or two.
    If that is so, you can get started as soon as your want.

    If you dont have any money .. get some first.
    Dont spend 300$ on an old broken lathe, if its your only cash.

    Machining does require some stuff, even at the low end.
    And trying to do without, your will neither learn well, learn right, nor use the rights tools or techniques.
    (example. Digital calipers vs micrometers. goes on endlessly).
    ((Experienced guys can do with less. Both because they have other tools to compensate, and they have experience).


    Better advice is available for better more directed, researched, questions.

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    I think a 16 year old would be best served with getting grades…true one does need smarts it run every job but better communication skills helps to get the better jobs.. IMHO best not to sacrifice grades even for a paper route.

    High school shop class is the place to start. Ace that class and do well in all others.

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    At 16 your hobby should be ..... trying to understand women.
    Over time they will kill you or keep you breathing.
    (not like any 16-24 year old will listen to this advice)

    Any local shops you can get a job at sweeping chips and filling coolant tanks?
    In the end you just jump in and screw up a bunch of stuff.
    Machine shop classes are not what they once were but if your school still has one it certainly helps.
    What you really need is a local "grumpy old machinist" with some tolerance for rookies.
    Small one to three man local shops with an owner that will put up with you asking pesky questions.
    Bob

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    this is very stupid since some of the 'hobby machines' can be brilliant for production - esp. where modifications and DIY machines are concerned - it's a very anti-creative and conservative - even reactionary view. But it is not surprising that on such forums for hierarchies to develop. we have seen this kind of thing before online.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Science View Post
    this is very stupid since some of the 'hobby machines' can be brilliant for production - .....
    I'm not sure what this means or why you would open this old thread but go ahead and school me as "drinking deeply from the well of knowledge sobers us" .
    I do have some experience in bringing 16 year olds into the machine tool world and a touch in the production side.
    Show us the "stupid" rather than just making such a comment.
    Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    I'm not sure what this means or why you would open this old thread but go ahead and school me as "drinking deeply from the well of knowledge sobers us" .
    I do have some experience in bringing 16 year olds into the machine tool world and a touch in the production side.
    Show us the "stupid" rather than just making such a comment.
    Bob
    What do you expect from an "Architect" ?....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Science View Post
    this is very stupid since some of the 'hobby machines' can be brilliant for production - esp. where modifications and DIY machines are concerned - it's a very anti-creative and conservative - even reactionary view. But it is not surprising that on such forums for hierarchies to develop. we have seen this kind of thing before online.
    Stupid is bumping a 5 year old thread to make your post.

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  26. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Science View Post
    this is very stupid since some of the 'hobby machines' can be brilliant for production - esp. where modifications and DIY machines are concerned - it's a very anti-creative and conservative - even reactionary view. But it is not surprising that on such forums for hierarchies to develop. we have seen this kind of thing before online.
    I agree, I've got 3 harbor freight mini Mills with CNC retrofits doing 2nd ops on my titanium and Cobalt chrome parts. Way cheaper than a "real" machine and just as accurate.





    Thanks
    Said no one ever


    Oh, how's that mini lathe working out for ya sport?

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    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    I agree, I've got 3 harbor freight mini Mills with CNC retrofits doing 2nd ops on my titanium and Cobalt chrome parts. Way cheaper than a "real" machine and just as accurate.





    Thanks
    Said no one ever


    Oh, how's that mini lathe working out for ya sport?
    Guy was too dense to believe that there were any people with engineering and design skills in here and he needed to go elsewhere for input on what many in here would consider simple issues. I doubt he will detect your sarcasm.

    That being noted, my Harbor Freight mill drill runs circles around my full sized commercial grade manual mill and lathe for fixtures, short run jobs and second ops as it is two machines in one, cutting set-up time. With it's compact size it can be placed in strategic locations to maximize work flow. I don't need a rigger to move it for you can place it on a shop cart right next to the machine it is second oping the parts for. Having multiple HF mill\drills scattered about has increased production immensely. They pay for themselves in no time flat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    Guy was too dense to believe that there were any people with engineering and design skills in here and he needed to go elsewhere for input on what many in here would consider simple issues. I doubt he will detect your sarcasm.

    That being noted, my Harbor Freight mill drill runs circles around my full sized commercial grade manual mill and lathe for fixtures, short run jobs and second ops as it is two machines in one, cutting set-up time. With it's compact size it can be placed in strategic locations to maximize work flow. I don't need a rigger to move it for you can place it on a shop cart right next to the machine it is second oping the parts for. Having multiple HF mill\drills scattered about has increased production immensely. They pay for themselves in no time flat.
    You should get a 3 in 1 machine, get rid of the big dangerous lathe too


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