Chernegarose Russian hand scraper
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  1. #1
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    Default Chernegarose Russian hand scraper

    Apparently, Russia and US not being on good terms, causes a whopping 2 1/2 month customs/shipping delay on this ebay item, but a what seems to be a good usable tool.
    This is the 500mm model, about 19 1\2 in long, its made of spring tempered steel, and powder coated, The overall quality seems good. The price was $26 and $12 shipping. They are clear on the order delay.


    The clamping end has a wide range using two screws and reversing the jaw, the blade or carbide thickness range looks to be 1/16" to 1/4".


    I am, going to be using the tool mostly for scraping rust and paint off of machined surfaces, I have no way scraping to do now.
    I think it was worth the wait, this photo using a 3/16 thick carbide blank to help secure a very useful DeWalt carbide edge utility blade, I was able to shave that plywood without the blade digging in, the long length adds stability.



    Further information just in, "the termite does not approve of this product."
    Last edited by donie; 03-25-2021 at 09:32 AM.

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    Is it worth the purchase?

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    In Mother Russia, you don't scrape surface...surface scrapes you!

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    Quote Originally Posted by JS View Post
    Is it worth the purchase?

    To me it looks rather stiff and not easily adaptable to a large pad to allow pushing it with your body.
    Moreover, rather than waiting that long, I'd spend at most one hour or two in the shop and make one that better suits me.

    Paolo

    PS I am guilty of having purchased brand name scrapers, having being very disappointed, and regretted the money wasted.

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    If the hordes of mordor took up scaping, id imagine their scrapers would look this way.

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    I am surprised termite has not responded.

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    In the Austrian class we did a year and 1/2 ago one of the students had a set of this guy's scrapers. I think there were 3 lengths, plus the carbide and ink this guy sells. The student who bought it, did not like the long one but he makes a shorter one that was nice for bump scraping. His ink sucked big time. it reminded me of water downed Permatex blue, The carbide seemed to be of lesser quality of the Sanvik and needed to be sharpened a lot more. The student who was from Germany and an Engineer, he said the Carbide wasn't compressed as hard as the Sanvik. Carbide Bob or Paolo can explain that. Heck I can make one from material from Home Depot or You can buy one made by Biax /Dapra and have the real McCoy. DAPRA.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by bob View Post
    I am surprised termite has not responded.
    Unable.

    'Been laughing too f*****g hard to manage the keyboard!!!

    At whom shudda seen him cumming, yet HAVE been sucked-in and responded!

    Might take him all year nowadays to dream this s**t up, but Drama-queen still knew EXACTLY how best to wind y'all up, didn't he?

    Cheap thrills. Well-played.

    It's what he does as "MOFU"! (Master Of the F*****g Universe)!


    Now HE is larfin' HIS arse off atcha, too!

    I ain't even gonna hold his beer!


    "What fools these mortals be!"

    Puck. "A Midsummer Night's dream". The immortal Willie Snakeshit.


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    The Home depot material is just not nice for a scraper... been there, did that, hated it and made something else out of the material. Nade it the same thickness of the others I have, NDG.

    Not "springy" enough, but too flexible. Needs a tool steel with a bit of heat treatment IMO, so as to get the best combo.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    The Home depot material is just not nice for a scraper... been there, did that, hated it and made something else out of the material. Nade it the same thickness of the others I have, NDG.

    Not "springy" enough, but too flexible. Needs a tool steel with a bit of heat treatment IMO, so as to get the best combo.
    Scout eBay for long but orphaned power-hacksaw blades. Drill. Laminate. Grind off the teeth if yer careless. DAMHIKT.

    Anyone will tell yah I don't know s**t.


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    The material is spring tempered tool steel, it is ridiculous to think one can be made in a few hours for less, that is unless it is a hobby! Think about that before you spout that out.
    I do have a couple of sandvic scrapers, as I said, I am using the Russian tool with a variety of blades to scrape paint off machined surfaces.
    I began to use the tool for my intended purpose, removing paint off a radial drill press, and an Axelson lathe, the tool is very useful due to its length for the hard to reach areas, with obstructions. The tool is fairly springy, it is light, and slim, reasonably well made and worth the price of around $40 total.
    This is the tool I need to remove paint and caked on thread cutting oil, I am not using for scraping ways, at this time, I avoid machines that worn out, to begin with, but do routine scraping every few years to catch the wear on my surface grinder.
    The wait was not an issue as now "good weather" is when I need it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    The material is spring tempered tool steel, it is ridiculous to think one can be made in a few hours for less, that is unless it is a hobby! Think about that before you spout that out.
    No, Sir phoney dipshit. A few MINUTES for less!

    I've got easily a dozen scrapers older that your entire useless ASS!

    And I am NOT a "scraper".

    It was just one more essential "base" skill ANY Old Skewl craftsman HAD to be prepared to handle if/as/when the need arose as a barrier to completing a LARGER tasking.

    Ask anyone who actually had a f****g DEADLINE to hit for a deliverable.. or go hungry! NOT some rude dilletante playin' wit' himself .... as you are.

    PAINT.. is a whole 'NUTHER skill set.

    You cannot tell the difference? Suggest you browse over to his new lair and get "machtool" to explain it to you!

    We do NOT "get along". We might never. BFD.

    But when Phil says 'scrape this way?' I read. I keep a copy.

    Because HE knows his s**t. Personalities irrelevant.

    That "meeting of the minds", you and he, oughta be worth a railcar load of popcorn for cheap entertainment!

    Go for it!

    Dare yah!


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    Interesting response! I fully understand that the hobby crowd has little understanding of the value of time in the shop.
    Even through the trolling by "Well.... Some may find the tool interesting and could, find the steel, shape it make the jaw, ect, do it yourself.
    The tool is performing better then expected, this photo shows the tool with a used DNMG 432 insert.
    More easily removing paint on this motor then a 5 in 1 standard paint scraper.

    I do think the moderator here is a decent person, that is not going to suffer the snap back to the troll from me, on his forum.


    This is the side that will be up scraping paint using a 1/2" IC carbide insert. The DNMG 432 can be quickly switched to the other side for knocking the paint off up to edges, the insert is very effective.

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    For scraping paint, that is a total waste of effort and money. I have, as most would, at least a half dozen types of tool that would scrape paint just fine. Some of them are DESIGNED to do that.... Gee-golly... who'd a thunk THAT?

    A decent way scraper is beyond overkill, although I'd bet it works pretty darn well for paint scraping.

    As for the value of time, scraping paint is a waste, hand the job to the apprentice, or get some paint stripper and let THAT work while you do something productive. Go back later and wipe the paint off.

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    I have not seen any machines you have done, but you are entitled to your caustic chemical opinion, and attitude in general.
    One major discovery for me on this is the use of negative rake lathe inserts for paint scraping, very effective, even on the cast non machined surfaces.
    The least costly way to test this, is to braze an insert to a length of rod and try it yourself instead of listening to those that have died, but dont know it.
    The tool however offers adjustment.

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    For removing old paint and grease from machinery it's spray oven cleaner for me. Follow up with lacquer thinner wipe down and your done.

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    There is a problem using chemicals, they also attack filler coats.
    For example the first machine Brown&Sharpe #2 mill had multiple coats of paint on top of, a black filler/primer, then work force green, and gray. The gray was added either at the factory, or the Hanford nuke site.
    Removing the black under coat will only cause more work, if you want the castings to look smooth.
    With a good working scraper, there really is not all that much paint to remove, but as said before the home depot stuff is a failure.
    So, with a good working scraper, the work force green paint will rip off, and the tool will shave the black undercoat, and your legs silky smooth.
    Both the radial drill, and the gear head lathe I am currently working on, have the black undercoat, with the work force green on top also.

    the mill here


    the machine is in a tight area, hard to get a photo of the whole machine


    this mill was simply drug out into the weather, it needs no way scraping, it was in great shape,
    Removing paint, and more important rust is fairly big job.

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    Carbide or HSS is harder than the undercoat also, and will do just as good a job on it. At least that has been my experience.

    I've tried nearly every method of removing paint over the years, scraping takes the longest, and is the most work. And it still damages the filler/undercoat unless you take even more time being very careful, then it only damages it a little.....

    Paint is made so that it sticks.... paint removal is difficult any way you slice it. Not all removers are caustic however, the ones containing N-methyl pyrriolidine work well. While not "nice", are not too poisonous, and tend to go thru one coat at a time. They have done less damage to coatings under the paint when I have used them, and they make some coatings nearly jump off the machine..

    peel-Way #7 worked pretty well for me on machines also. I don't recall the ingredients, you can look up the MSDS.

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    There are certainly many ways to remove paint, as far scraping, I have not found anything better then the DMMT 432 lathe inserts I am using now "in a holder", the less then razor sharp edges, and formed chip breaker keeps the tool from digging in like a plain sharpened piece of carbide, and removes the paint faster, with more control and less effort.
    The radial drill here, after going over the painted areas with a wire brush on an angle grinder, the paint left behind is rock hard.
    I have almost all the paint off now, the rust on the column took many hours to carefully remove, and the metal is good.
    I believe the quality of the cast iron in the mill, and the drill saved them.

    The old lathe to the right has no rust, instead it was caked with light thread cutting oil over nearly 80yrs.
    After removing the oil off the paint, the paint has nearly peeled up on its own. The lathe has a nasty old oil smell to it. That is getting better.


    the work force green can be seen along with the filler coat, the drill is a Morris, same as installed in the big WW2 battle ships maintenance machine shops, the drill has some unique features, such as precision spindle bearings, the machine has little actual use, just dragged out in the weather. A not so wise project for me because of the time involved, but, I will end up with a nice drill.
    It is hard to just let machines like these die the slow death in the scrap pile, but the drill alone weighs 6000lbs and is over 8ft tall!

    I know this part of working on machines is not nearly as exciting as way scraping, the paint prep is important in its own way, and tedious.



    '

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    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    For scraping paint, that is a total waste of effort and money. I have, as most would, at least a half dozen types of tool that would scrape paint just fine. Some of them are DESIGNED to do that.... Gee-golly... who'd a thunk THAT?

    A decent way scraper is beyond overkill, although I'd bet it works pretty darn well for paint scraping.

    As for the value of time, scraping paint is a waste, hand the job to the apprentice, or get some paint stripper and let THAT work while you do something productive. Go back later and wipe the paint off.
    LOL! In retirement? Surely. Handed the job to "the apprentice" and re-discovered he was ME!



    Scrapers on flat surfaces are just not rocket-science.

    Curves are the challenge.

    Glove-up, triple.

    Nitrile or poly inner to keep solvent out of the bloodstream.
    Heavier fabric-in rubber, such as tile-setters gloves to protect the thin membrane
    Cheap split cowhide leather, "sacrificial" (wotever was on "big sale") to give the costlier middle ones a longer life.

    Grab your stainless steel "chore ball" from scrubbing pots and pans, dip in appropriate liquid or even "dry".

    Scrub!

    Fast, effective, follows any curve, inner, outer, or complex.

    Flat blade or even fixed-curved just don't DOO curves very well, let alone "fast". About as crude as sculpting wooden statues with an axe or chain-saw.

    Would have thought that was obvious?


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