Chernegarose Russian hand scraper - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 77
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    St Louis
    Posts
    19,317
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2403
    Likes (Received)
    3652

    Default

    I have no issue with wanting a good looking machine, I'm just too lazy a bastard to spend much time on it for most machines.

    I prefer the chemical method of paint removal because I can do something else while it works. I've scraped, sanded, and scoured off too damn much paint already, and I hate doing it.

    I'll spend lots of time getting dirt, grit and grime off a machine. Paint.... no. Not unless it is falling off, in which case yeah, I get it.

  2. Likes neilho liked this post
  3. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    20,164
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    11992

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    I have no issue with wanting a good looking machine, I'm just too lazy a bastard to spend much time on it for most machines.

    I prefer the chemical method of paint removal because I can do something else while it works. I've scraped, sanded, and scoured off too damn much paint already, and I hate doing it.

    I'll spend lots of time getting dirt, grit and grime off a machine. Paint.... no. Not unless it is falling off, in which case yeah, I get it.
    I'm luvin' what "Goop" waterless hand cleaner has enabled. Cleans 'em up with no damage to the paint .... that it did not already have.

    Cazeneuve had a lot of flat sheet-metal acreage, most of it detachable cabinetry, shields, covers, guards, & trays. So I could have simply sent it down the road to an autobody shop!

    Darned if the paint under the grime and varnish didn't turn out to be 95% still good ! Aside from some touch up, the only elbow-grease it ended-up needing is sorting the liner of the slanted oval chip ejection chutes formed as part of the bed & web casting and the flat rear deck the chips come out onto - itself scoured to bare metal ages ago BY the sharpish chips.

    I'm good wit' dat'. VERY!

    The one busting my chops is the Alzmettal DP.

    Mostly flat surfaces. But THICK layers of paint have aged like a dried-out mud-flat, curled-up in sharpish flakes

    Common "wallpaper" scraper does the do. Blades are cheap. It is the right size, has a slight angle, and comfortable grip.

    Didn't even have to import "tempered tool steel" made out of dead Lada motorcars or over-age-in-grade Soviet-era tanks shelled to s**t by drone-guided Ukrainian heavy artillery, then hauled away by scrap-scavengers! Rooshin arsenals hadn't been too poorly funded to buy gas for cutting torches, might never have NEEDED another damn-fool war?


  4. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Country
    NAMIBIA
    Posts
    265
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    112
    Likes (Received)
    59

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    There is a problem using chemicals, they also attack filler coats.
    For example the first machine Brown&Sharpe #2 mill had multiple coats of paint on top of, a black filler/primer, then work force green, and gray. The gray was added either at the factory, or the Hanford nuke site.
    Removing the black under coat will only cause more work, if you want the castings to look smooth.
    With a good working scraper, there really is not all that much paint to remove, but as said before the home depot stuff is a failure.
    So, with a good working scraper, the work force green paint will rip off, and the tool will shave the black undercoat, and your legs silky smooth.
    Both the radial drill, and the gear head lathe I am currently working on, have the black undercoat, with the work force green on top also.

    the mill here


    the machine is in a tight area, hard to get a photo of the whole machine


    this mill was simply drug out into the weather, it needs no way scraping, it was in great shape,
    Removing paint, and more important rust is fairly big job.
    Nice work !!! Heart warming !

    We did a couple of SIP jig borers, full treatment to as new and I remember one of them was a nightmare as nothing could even passably soften the paint. If I remember well it was a pretty early one, 271 or so. Early 30s. I was told by an OLD paint chemist that it was vinyl paint.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    20,164
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    11992

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Orbital77 View Post
    Nice work !!! Heart warming !

    We did a couple of SIP jig borers, full treatment to as new and I remember one of them was a nightmare as nothing could even passably soften the paint. If I remember well it was a pretty early one, 271 or so. Early 30s. I was told by an OLD paint chemist that it was vinyl paint.
    Methyl Ethyl Ketone for that. NASTY s**t! Very!

    We used it to make Armstrong vinyl flooring corners appear 'seamless' as the rest of the roll by dissolving scraps, then applying as filler.

    Walter's "Plas O Lux" at fifty 1966 bucks a two ounce was another "mystery paint".

    Coat a pair of yer new paratroop boots, it was impervious to scuffs, flexed with the leather, held the shine of patent leather through a 24 hour by 3-day field exercise in the mud ... and more.. but showed proper flex and wrinkles.

    Made for?

    Painting the black identification numbers onto high-alloy USAF supersonic fighter jets that went from extreme cold to extreme heat in mere seconds. And with the metal changing size and flexing from stress, all the while.

    Wasn't "ordinary" vinyl. Something far tougher. I could see the likes of Moore doing the very same and grinning their "tough act to follow!" arses off .. up on mount Olympus.

    Where else?


  6. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Country
    NAMIBIA
    Posts
    265
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    112
    Likes (Received)
    59

    Default

    AND WHERE COULD ONE BUY IT TODAY ??? 'Cause everything else we used seemed made from recycled shi...x.
    40 years ago you could buy a decent 2k urethane and once dry solvents won't touch it. Now, you spit on it and it wrinkles.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    20,164
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    11992

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Orbital77 View Post
    AND WHERE COULD ONE BUY IT TODAY ??? 'Cause everything else we used seemed made from recycled shi...x.
    40 years ago you could buy a decent 2k urethane and once dry solvents won't touch it. Now, you spit on it and it wrinkles.
    Pretty sure that's a market localization issue.

    Hong Kong, for example, is dominated by uber-premium priced Japanese made paints, next German.

    So-called uber-grade or not, they are BOTH horrible compared to even rather average US paints.

    Even in a far larger market, here, we have to go to specializd industrial coatings distributors. "Big Box" and other local retailers only stock what their Point of Sale 'puters show as "turning" rapidly.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Vershire, Vermont
    Posts
    2,756
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1927
    Likes (Received)
    918

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post

    And did you get the Hardinge chucker in the background?

  9. #28
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Walla Walla Wine and Wild Turkey
    Posts
    5,604
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    23
    Likes (Received)
    815

    Default

    Ok, looks like the troll is still under the bridge!
    In near real time, this is the reality that I know is real! Faceless people that hide behind stupid dynamic names, like that of a smokey crappy powder, are not real to me, they just dont understand..

    Anyway, I am making short work of the paint here, on down past the work force green, to the black filler coat, but I will leave some work force green, where it helps fill the low areas.
    The paint is not as much of an effort as the rust, here it can be seen the progress on the column.
    This is a precision low hours radial drill press, that was drug outside, then hauled to a scrap yard for more exposure. I dont know how long, the mill and the drill were together, along with an American made Century Lathe, The lathe is still there.
    The way this drill is designed, the water that did get in the head, did little damage. Other designed drills would not have survived for reasonable repair.


    Again, this is a precision machine, that was in the United States High Energy Weapons Program Hanford, and so tagged.
    One could go after that column with an angle grinder and wire brush, but that person is not me, I am going to do everything I can to preserve the precision that was built into the machine, I got myself into this, and I am going to get it done.
    Just out of view behind the column is a long Acme screw,
    That screw was hard to clean using the Acetone Atf mix, but, the typical brass brushes at the crap stores are just no good, one needs to find a brush and broom dealer, and spend the money for decent brushes with stiff bristles that last, and do the job.



    It didnt look all that bad, would you just walk by? Ha Ha!

  10. Likes DanLinsch, Mcgyver liked this post
  11. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    St Louis
    Posts
    19,317
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2403
    Likes (Received)
    3652

    Default

    The scraping sure did take off the rust. Not a bad approach, from what I see in the pics.

    Does the edge treatment take off rust and keep it from biting the iron that well? Or is it a combo with technique and/or a secondary operation?

  12. #30
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Walla Walla Wine and Wild Turkey
    Posts
    5,604
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    23
    Likes (Received)
    815

    Default

    The first step is to use the scraper "for rust", very much like a square nose brazed carbide lathe tool.
    I found for my strength, pushing a 1/2" wide carbide edge under the rust, is the right amount of effort, combined with control not to dig into the precision surface.
    I try to make the passes as long as possible, prefer to offset the spaces, and come back.
    Once the rust is scraped away, the mix "that really does not mix" Acetone+The cheapest ATF fluid is applied using the brass brush, and working in all directions, the rust is pulled pulled out of the pores in the cast iron, in a black slurry, you want to keep that black slurry going until it clears. Do that at least a couple of times then wipe down with kerosene, then oil daily if possible, and the machine brightens up more over time.
    You have to have eye protection, scrubbing with that stuff.


    The surface under the rust still shows flaking, a good brass brush above, around $18.
    I would think re scraping those head travel surfaces would be a challenge, there is a dove tail at the bottom,
    Removing the arm, is a serious deal!

    photo above just taken, the battle is full on. I have several things still stuck, the major movement of swing is perfect, elevation of the arm is free, but, there is a safety nut "captured nut" that will catch the well over a ton arm, from dropping and killing you, if the lifting nut system fails-The geared nut rotates on Timkin bearings, the lifting screw is stationary, a critical part of the machine, it all appears good,
    The lift has a separate motor, I am moving the arm up manually to finish the rust removal.

  13. Likes SIP6A, JST, Orbital77, pressbrake1, M.B. Naegle liked this post
  14. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    St Louis
    Posts
    19,317
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2403
    Likes (Received)
    3652

    Default

    Well, dang it, I may have to try that system after all. The result is certainly good, no arguing with that.

    The old razor blade deal was recommended to me long ago, and I found it not to work well. Actually it kinda did, but the blade lasted so short a time as to be almost silly.

    I will likely still use the "Evaporust" gunk for a lot of small things, but larger ones where they cannot be submerged in the Evaporust, I'll give this a try.

    Thanks for the information.

    If you don't mind, what do you do to the edge of the carbide? You mentioned taking off the sharp edge, but it was not clear to me what you left in its place.

  15. #32
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Walla Walla Wine and Wild Turkey
    Posts
    5,604
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    23
    Likes (Received)
    815

    Default

    Yes, the woodworkers say razor blades, but they are not familiar with working with carbide.
    I take a carbide blank 1/2" wide 3/16" thick and braze it into a flat on a round rod, I have cutter grinder machine, to sharpen the forward edge without radius, then lightly roll the edge and corners over with a fine diamond stone, or use it on some scap steel a little to break the razor edge, the rust scraping works better with a less then dead sharp tool, but the rust is abrasive, and the tool will have to touched up with a diamond hand stone, but will have to be machine ground again at some point.
    All the small parts, including screws I scrub by hand because when parts are put in other chemical/water solution, it changes the look of them.

    All stuck and rusted screws, and fasteners are removed using an Ox Acet torch with a small brazing tip, and Bees Wax, I break no screws, it can take several attempts.
    Good luck.





    Say What?


    Work Force Green!

    The Hardinge chucker is also in my drive way.

  16. Likes Orbital77, JHOLLAND1, DanLinsch liked this post
  17. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Imlay City, Michigan
    Posts
    2,251
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    132
    Likes (Received)
    269

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    Well, dang it, I may have to try that system after all. The result is certainly good, no arguing with that.

    The old razor blade deal was recommended to me long ago, and I found it not to work well. Actually it kinda did, but the blade lasted so short a time as to be almost silly.

    I will likely still use the "Evaporust" gunk for a lot of small things, but larger ones where they cannot be submerged in the Evaporust, I'll give this a try.

    Thanks for the information.

    If you don't mind, what do you do to the edge of the carbide? You mentioned taking off the sharp edge, but it was not clear to me what you left in its place.
    I’ve had good luck with Evaporust on large items and vertical surfaces by soaking heavy paper towels and covering with plastic, leave for a day or two......works excellent!

    Kevin

  18. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    20,164
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    11992

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bsg View Post
    I’ve had good luck with Evaporust on large items and vertical surfaces by soaking heavy paper towels and covering with plastic, leave for a day or two......works excellent!

    Kevin
    The usual caution with a(ny) chelating agent - or reverse electrolysis - is that it can etch a black line/groove right at a(ny) liquid-to-air transition where atmospheric Oxygen gets to become a player in the chemistry going on in the boundary zone.

    10% to 20% agro-grade molasses might make it easier to reduce there BEING any such sharpish transition? Once diluted, it isn't as sticky as straight molasses, but still...

    For comparison.. only.. a useful advantage of "Naval Jelly" over ignorant Phosphoric acid, technical grade .. is the "gel" part ... so it stays where it is placed. Or partly so, anyway.

    I can't fault B'rer D. on trying to avoid strong reagents. Or even the weaker ones on large and VERY "in your face" visible areas such as the DP column.

    Too many unpredictables, and near-zero of them readily reversible once their damage has progressed into even the barest surface penetration of the metal.

    The AB5/S "column" drill has an annoying "stain" staring right atcha even after getting the column smooth again. And there it sits. Begging to be ground and hard-chromed?

    No need. Not happening!

    UNlike a radial DP, which can use near-as-dammit 100% of its entire column, the table can't even GET that high up anyway on a fixed-head column drill.

    So it shall remain a great DEAL less attractive than Angie Dickinson's legs were in that memorable scene in "Rio Bravo"!



    Ain't it great after all, that nobody has to look at MY photos ... and can go enjoy a good "Golden Oldie" of a movie instead?


  19. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    St Louis
    Posts
    19,317
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2403
    Likes (Received)
    3652

    Default

    I have not used "Naval Jelly" in well over 30 years. But when I did, it really was not effective with more than minimal rust.

    That makes sense, since the active material in even a generous dollop of the "jelly" is small, compared to that in a tank of phosphoric without the "jelly". It just cannot handle much rust. The stuff is a very expensive way to buy phosphoric acid.*

    You DO want to submerge the part in Evaporust. Yes, it will leave a line, not etched,maybe, but surely discolored if you do not fully submerge it.

    But, if you do, the result is a clean part with minimal staining of any sort. It looks pretty much like clean steel when you are done, modified, of course, by the roughening that is due to the steel having rusted before the treatment. That is not avoidable, but is also not the fault of phosphoric, or Evaporust, it is the fault of the ignorant ass who let the machine rust to begin with.

    Keith Rucker notwithstanding, it is usually impractical to take a large piece of equipment apart in order to soak big sections of it in Evaporust.

    Many alternatives exist. I like 400 or 600 grit wet-or-dry silicon carbide paper combined with light oil. That both removes the rust, and seems to "embed the oil" in some way that is protective even after a good wipe-down.

    No fear of changing dimensions in a hurry that way. The rust has already done some of that, but you would work a long time to make much progress if you WANTED to change dimensions using that method. DAMHIKT.

    Scraping rust as described above sounds like a good way, and I am sure I will try it in future. I'm not in a hurry to have that problem, though............

    * Phosphoric works well, but does have some issues. It does tend to leave a phosphate coating, that darkens the steel, and needs to be wiped or brushed off. It can also create "stress corrosion" and produce etching if the part has surface strains (from hardening), and can eat through things like springs that are under stress when put in the phosphoric. Otherwise, it works rather well, and is quite cheap.

  20. Likes Oldwrench liked this post
  21. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    20,164
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    11992

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    I have not used "Naval Jelly" in well over 30 years. But when I did, it really was not effective with more than minimal rust.

    That makes sense, since the active material in even a generous dollop of the "jelly" is small, compared to that in a tank of phosphoric without the "jelly". It just cannot handle much rust. The stuff is a very expensive way to buy phosphoric acid.*

    You DO want to submerge the part in Evaporust. Yes, it will leave a line, not etched,maybe, but surely discolored if you do not fully submerge it.

    But, if you do, the result is a clean part with minimal staining of any sort. It looks pretty much like clean steel when you are done, modified, of course, by the roughening that is due to the steel having rusted before the treatment. That is not avoidable, but is also not the fault of phosphoric, or Evaporust, it is the fault of the ignorant ass who let the machine rust to begin with.

    Keith Rucker notwithstanding, it is usually impractical to take a large piece of equipment apart in order to soak big sections of it in Evaporust.

    Many alternatives exist. I like 400 or 600 grit wet-or-dry silicon carbide paper combined with light oil. That both removes the rust, and seems to "embed the oil" in some way that is protective even after a good wipe-down.

    No fear of changing dimensions in a hurry that way. The rust has already done some of that, but you would work a long time to make much progress if you WANTED to change dimensions using that method. DAMHIKT.

    Scraping rust as described above sounds like a good way, and I am sure I will try it in future. I'm not in a hurry to have that problem, though............

    * Phosphoric works well, but does have some issues. It does tend to leave a phosphate coating, that darkens the steel, and needs to be wiped or brushed off. It can also create "stress corrosion" and produce etching if the part has surface strains (from hardening), and can eat through things like springs that are under stress when put in the phosphoric. Otherwise, it works rather well, and is quite cheap.
    The trick with Naval Jelly - and why I still use it - is simply to pay more attention to what one learnt whilst acing Chemistry HS & Uni... and defy their instructions "Big Time".

    Ex: 11" steel beams across my shop were as-rolled, PO hadn't bothered to prep nor paint.

    Power and hand wire brush, follow with gel off a large paint brush, then IMMEDIATELY start second and third pass with progressively DILUTED jelly.

    First go gets the "usual" black conversion material. Second pass, diluted, has gone grey. Third pass has gone pale whitish, no "grey" left.. and you follow with the outlet of a shop vac to dehydrate THAT .. but leave it in place.

    And now.... the paint. Right away.

    Rustoleum "hammer" finishes have no RIGHT to be as good as paints as they HAVE been (formulations used to change every time California outlawed a different flavour of flatulence..), let alone NEED NO primer other than itself.

    And my "poor boy bonderized effect" beam is soon a done deal... and about as durable as can be.

    Machine-tool application of that crude technique?

    Out-of-sight areas.

    INSIDE of bases and pedestals.

    Such as the factory one for the tiny Burke. Even after media blast. Well it was a pain in the arse to reach... and who cares anyway..

    Because the surface conversion helps very ordinary single-component paints adhere like a greedy woman.

    No need of exotic primers and paints, their high cost, their mess, their health hazards, or their challenges of clean-up... nor wear or damage touch-up difficulty, even many years later.

    IOW the payoff isn't IN the use of the Jelly or the liquid acid, (optionally available "buffered", BTW).

    The savings are all in what comes afterwards.

  22. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Country
    NAMIBIA
    Posts
    265
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    112
    Likes (Received)
    59

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by donie View Post
    The first step is to use the scraper "for rust", very much like a square nose brazed carbide lathe tool.
    I found for my strength, pushing a 1/2" wide carbide edge under the rust, is the right amount of effort, combined with control not to dig into the precision surface.
    I try to make the passes as long as possible, prefer to offset the spaces, and come back.
    Once the rust is scraped away, the mix "that really does not mix" Acetone+The cheapest ATF fluid is applied using the brass brush, and working in all directions, the rust is pulled pulled out of the pores in the cast iron, in a black slurry, you want to keep that black slurry going until it clears. Do that at least a couple of times then wipe down with kerosene, then oil daily if possible, and the machine brightens up more over time.
    You have to have eye protection, scrubbing with that stuff.


    The surface under the rust still shows flaking, a good brass brush above, around $18.
    I would think re scraping those head travel surfaces would be a challenge, there is a dove tail at the bottom,
    Removing the arm, is a serious deal!

    photo above just taken, the battle is full on. I have several things still stuck, the major movement of swing is perfect, elevation of the arm is free, but, there is a safety nut "captured nut" that will catch the well over a ton arm, from dropping and killing you, if the lifting nut system fails-The geared nut rotates on Timkin bearings, the lifting screw is stationary, a critical part of the machine, it all appears good,
    The lift has a separate motor, I am moving the arm up manually to finish the rust removal.
    Wonderful work ! Thank you for showing it !

    I noticed that more often than not rusted CI precision surfs are perfectly fine once the rust is ( gently ) removed. I like your system, we did use something mildly similar once or twice. In general, a properly flat surf is not easy to damage through reasonable cleaning. Often it's actually improved...

  23. #38
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Wyoming
    Posts
    3,687
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9271
    Likes (Received)
    6036

    Default

    I'd like to say, as one who started his enterprise by restoring junkyard machines in the same way as Donie, that he's Da Man. That is some beautiful work.

    Done right, like he demonstrates, bringing old machine tools back to life can be so seductive a process that one runs a real risk of becoming a curator rather than continuing on to business success. If you're really going to use them the way they were intended, I think you have to pretend it's WW2 against your competition, and not just as an exercise in nostalgia.

    The hardest decisions I had to make involved selling or scrapping restoration projects that had earned their keep during their ten-odd years' service life after being brought back from the dead. When they went out the door for the last ride I remembered every last scrubbed and reblued nut, bolt and screw. I consoled myself by imagining they were going to Valhalla—they hadn't been wasted as hobby machines; they had, their second time around, earned an actual decent living for workers who oiled 'em and maintained 'em, myself included. Only when it became painfully obvious that we could no longer use them to compete with their CNC equivalents did I let my old restored machines go.

    I guess the days of using a turret lathe to compete with the high-speed turning centers of your competitors' shops are pretty much gone now. It's John Henry against the steam-powered rock drill. But nobody says I can't admire with all my being the effort that brings a rusted junkyard denizen back to that 1938 showroom appearance. Good on yer, Donie.

  24. Likes SIP6A, JST, Demon73, M.B. Naegle liked this post
  25. #39
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Walla Walla Wine and Wild Turkey
    Posts
    5,604
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    23
    Likes (Received)
    815

    Default

    I think the pissy attitudes over the Russian scraper is funny! The ones with the most piss over it, are not capable of even operating it.
    I have a block of time to hammer on this radial drill project, so that is whats happening in my world.
    But first a Demo! - using the Acetone\ATF, along with the brass brush, after scraping the heavy rust off.

    Photos are just better then BS typed rapidly, with puny, pudgy, jelly doughnut fingers, that some appear to have, but that is not us, we are real men!

    The stuff,


    My home made scraper, carbide blank brazed to a piece of steel rod. Pushing the thick rust off, notice the rust is dry under that oil.


    Here it is the mix applied with a brass brush, and the dark slurry that forms and boils, as more is added, and the brush scrubbing the rust out of the pits and pores!



    After the first application, not too bad, two more applications and it it will look pretty good, then actually using the machine, and wiping down with kerosene/ a little oil often the dark spots fade in fairly short time.

    The original table finish is still visible.

    I was able to move the arm to the top of the column, using heat to help drive the mix into the bearing area of the arm, and break it free.


    Same routine, scraping, brushing, but much harder to do then a flat surface, and took considerable time, more important work then bashing the troll here.


    A little different, when a moving member is rusted in place, it leaves rings, as seen here. The rings are etched into the metal, and can not be totally removed, but the black spots fade, and they will be hardly noticeable in time.
    The progress seems to be at a reasonable clip, maybe a 100 hrs more, and the machine will be drilling holes.

  26. Likes DanLinsch, Mcgyver liked this post
  27. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    6,165
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2161
    Likes (Received)
    2152

    Default

    Looks good donie. I often use a similar method. You might also try some Bar Keeper's Friend powdered cleanser on any stubborn rust spots that you don't want to damage. I have found it to work well also. The oxalic acid does the job pretty nicely. And the brass brush does work wonders sometimes. Not sure what it is about those but they do bring back bright metal pretty well. The brush tend to get eaten during the process but it's worth the small sacrifice.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •