Lagun Anilam CNC Mill with broken tab on Y axis gib
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  1. #1
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    Default Lagun Anilam CNC Mill with broken tab on Y axis gib

    Hello. I am working through my Hurricane Harvey salt water flooded shop. A few days ago the Y axis on my old Lagun Anilam CNC machine seized up. it turns out the y axis gib got stuck on some rust in the dovetail. While trying to remove the gib, The "Tab" broke off while pulling the gib adjustment screw. I talked to a shop and there is supposed to be a repair procedure for this. In case I fail at the repair, Does anyone have a estimated cost for scraping in a new Y axis gib on a Lagun mill. Just a very basic ball park figure. Or is scraping in a new gib something I can learn in months, not years. I want to know if this is going to be the death of this machine I guess. The mill was pretty cheap and a bit clapped out when I got it, now it has been Salt water flooded and sat for over a year, I tried to exercise the table and gears over that time, but I made the mistake of not exercising all the way to the travel stops.
    This is more of a hobby machine at least for now.
    location is South Texas

    thanks

  2. #2
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    Are you talking about the notch that the adjustment screw head goes in? You might get away with drilling and tapping a hole and screwing it back on. I’d be more worried about all the bearings


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    I can help you with the scraping side of things (PM sent).

    I've got a couple of Harvey victums I'm working on as well. It'll be interesting to see what kinds of problems come up in these machines over the coming years.

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    ripper I think the broken part is the notch. there is supposed to be a repair like you suggest for this. I had never paid much attention to the gib , so I don't really know what it looked like before.
    yep M.B. I am beginning to lose a bit of faith in these machines recovery. I fear there are going to be lots of bearing problems. I had a full 6 feet of salt water run through the shop. I also have a Lagun FT-1 step head manual mill. both of these machines were pretty worn out before the storm. Now I fear they are going to be more trouble than I can replace them for. I originally thought they would come back pretty easy, but now I don't know.
    just now I don't know how it happened, but the x-axis ball screw bearing cap on the left side of the LAGUN/Anilam just broke. I guess maybe when I finally got the y axis gib pulled out, the table may have side shifted and broke the x axis bearing housing. The x-axis was one of the only good things on this mill. I am pretty sure all of the CNC part of this old mill will need to be retrofit, I am guessing I can replace for less cost than repair. I was working toward a CNC electronics refit on this machine before the storm, so I am sort of prepared for that, but I was hoping to keep the old ball screws, and I was going to try and work with the old servos, but now I fear it is all garbage.
    sorry, breaking that freakin bearing housing was just a bad end to the day.

    I will keep at it, but sometimes it just gets to me. I also had the band saw up and running, and I finally put a blade on it today and made the first cut since the storm. I got that one cut made and shut down , then went to start up for the second cut and just a growling motor. GRRRRRR CRAP!!!

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    Now that I cleaned up a bit and found the broken part of the gib I can see the process for the repair. I am still PO'd about the broken x axis bearing cap.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20190516_184226.jpg  

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    I’d mill off the end of the gib flush with the notch and make a new piece that screwed on ( threads tapped along the length of the gib)


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    good morning ripper. last night I had thought about trying to tap into the top of the broken bit, but your solution sounds much better. repairing from the top does not have near as much good structure to tap into as coming from the long end.

    ok so for that I need a mill. Which brings us to todays project. I am pretty sure I did cause the table to side shift when I pulled out the y axis gib, so that is what broke the x axis bearing housing. I am going to shelve the Lagun Anilam CNC machine for a bit, so I just re installed the broken gib about 75% of the way, so I can move the table. I am going to put that on the back burner, lots and lots of work there I would rather wait to see if I can get some Air conditioning working in the shop for that

    ok now for today. I also have a old Lagun FT-1 step pulley mill. Same sort of damage. except different sliding parts stuck on rusty parts. The step pulley machine as of a few days ago is now stuck in low/back gear, and I broke the sheer pin in the back gear change handle. I have been in initial contact with H&W machine repair. they seem like nice helpful people. I only spoke with a tech for a minute or two. I wanted to know how far down into the head I have to go to get to the back gear change, I was happy to learn that I don't have to disassemble all the way to the quill level, but just below the step pulley. Todays project will be to get started on that. So motor pull top housing pull. I am going to re-watch the Bridgeport teardown videos to see if I can get a better vision of what I am going to do. But In I go.
    The Ft-1 has a much better chance of coming back to life much faster than the Lagun CNC. The salt water did not reach the motor level on either machine, so that is good, but the water did get pretty close. Water definitely over the quill on both machines, and up into the speed change areas. I guess just above the manual quill brake at least on the manual machine. Also my first and only home made phase converter pull chord type with 3 household light switches seems to have survived. So that is another reason the manual machine will make a faster comeback.

    I am kind of thinking about ordering up head rebuild kit from H&W. But I am tearing into the machine today.

    If anyone has any pointers on the Lagun head tear down I am open to tips and tricks.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------

    Excellent post on the gib, however the electric motor is not for this forum, please keep electrical issues and other mechanical repairs in the General or machine specific forum. Thanks Moderator.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------

    thanks
    Last edited by CBlair; 05-18-2019 at 07:23 AM.

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    If the exterior of the motor is the only issue, I wouldn't submerge it in anything. I'm not sure how evaporust will react with the windings. From my experience, when motors get water inside, you have to act fast and get all of the water out before corrosion sets in. This is hard to do as it can soak in between all the many layers and elements inside the motor and take awhile to evaporate out. Once it starts to corrode, getting ride of the corrosion almost doesn't mater as the corrosion can leave voids between conductive parts and their insulation and in the insulation itself.

    If it was me, I'd take them to a motor shop that can open them up and see how they check out. They can check resistance on the windings and find moisture or damage before electricity burns it up.

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    Man, it's been almost two years since hurricane Harvey. If those motors and any other electronics/ electrical have not been touched since then, they are probably toast and non-recoverable. The bearings in any motor as well as in the machines saw any salt water or just water, need to be replaced. As M.B. said, the motors need to be sent out so they can be gone thru, the windings "megged" to make sure they will run. Your machines if submerged in water need to be completely tore down, gone thru, cleaned and oiled then put back together. Where here in South Texas was your shop located? Ken

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    Ken read the last paragraph of post 7. We just talked about a new gib in the Vermont class. Warren's worn out Bridgeport gibs were worn out on the wear side. I would have applied Turcite on the worn side and used the old gib. Replacing with new gibs is super, but it takes a lot of work cutting, sometimes grinding the taper, cutting the notch and scraping. Now with this broken notch you can make and extension and braze on the end old gib, mill off the old notch and cut a new end and cap screw it on and braze, re-work. In this case I would buy a new gib as the others are 1/2 way fixes. Be sure to scrape back and front of the new gib and check the taper. H&W has a super You Tube show on testing the gib. I would also stone the ways of the machine to be sure the burrs are gone.

    If your near Houston / Galveston. Steve Watkins in Navasota about is a good apprentice machine rebuilder and can teach you to scrape. He is a member of the forum. Ken and John Oder also can scrape and are in the SE Texas. Please show and tell us what you do. Rich


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