Need help for renew my lathe bedways
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  1. #1
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    Default Need help for renew my lathe bedways

    Hello to every one, i am new here
    Few months ago i started to repair an old lathe EMAG made round 1920 and 1930 birth
    Its a double v and triple wall bed, unusual to me , but wonderful design
    dsc_0268.jpgdsc_0267.jpgdsc_0266.jpg
    Anyone can explain whats the steps on the surface grinder to make it straight and smoth again?
    I meen you can not just touch a surface and start to grind

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    Quote Originally Posted by smic1978 View Post
    Hello to every one, i am new here
    Few months ago i started to repair an old lathe EMAG made round 1920 and 1930 birth
    Its a double v and triple wall bed, unusual to me , but wonderful design
    dsc_0268.jpgdsc_0267.jpgdsc_0266.jpg
    Anyone can explain whats the steps on the surface grinder to make it straight and smoth again?
    I meen you can not just touch a surface and start to grind
    VERY interesting bed design. I've not seen one like this. Perhaps Richard or one of the experts has.

    I'd expect the same techniques as to selecting reference surface(s) as other flat+prismatatic-vee lathes, just modestly complicated by the extra plane, altitude-wise. Bit of extra setup challenge, perhaps, but not a game-changer.

    Greek Macedonia, is it? What sort of grinder(s) do you have access to nearby?

    Bill

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    Hello Bill
    Yes it is greece Macedonia
    The grinder is Boehringer made and as alternative a Stanko

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    Quote Originally Posted by smic1978 View Post
    Hello Bill
    Yes it is greece Macedonia
    The grinder is Boehringer made and as alternative a Stanko
    .. then whomever runs said beast(s) as a Day Job probably already has the knowledge to do the setup.

    Helpful if you can sort the BEST surviving reference surface, 'coz that can involve a good deal of tedious measuring for any lathe that has served as long as that one has.

    Otherwise .. unless someone in Europe has the info, I'd suspect you'll have to wing it on the angles and such, treat it much as if you had been designing it from scratch, and just make everything straight, true, parallel, aligned, etc... and fit its mates to it.

    If you were a rich man.... you might see if Richard King would go for a working holiday in Pella for the novelty of both an unusual machine and environment...



    Bill

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    mmmh, not so unusual.
    The bigger Graziano and the Rivoli machines(italian made, among the best lathes ever made around here) shared a similar design. The purpose of having one set (the one guiding the carriage) of guides below the main plane of the bed was to make protection from swarf more effective by means of fixed, heavy gauge sheet metal covers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ocean View Post
    The purpose of having one set (the one guiding the carriage) of guides below the main plane of the bed was to make protection from swarf more effective by means of fixed, heavy gauge sheet metal covers.
    I thought that was a side benefit, with the main point being to provide extra swing near the chuck without the headaches of a gap. But neither of those features seem to be shared by the lathe in question.

    Smic, it is normal to use unworn sections at each end for reference.

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    If Richard King or you Bill want to come and see the machine , you are both welcome
    I am not a rich man but i have empty rooms at my home to sit back, and the see is just 1 hour away!

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    Thanks for your coment Ocean
    Wen i said unusual i meant for the age of the machine
    p1010053.jpgp1010053.jpg
    Graziano is a high class machine for me to, but its 20 years later design and i dont know if its triple wall bedp1010053.jpg

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    Thank you Lofty!

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    Quote Originally Posted by smic1978 View Post
    Graziano is a high class machine for me to, but its 20 years later design and i dont know if its triple wall bed
    Aside from 'triple wall' ... the bed shown is 'triangulated'. That's a decent way of stiffening a structure for a given investment in mass. Graf Zeppelin designed his dirigible frames that way.

    It is not necessarily the best way to provide the stability a lathe bed wants. Nor to provide for getting chips out of the way.
    Ergo, it has been shoved aside for shapes that deliver more appropriate overall compromises - most of them involving oval or ellipse.

    I'd rate it a 'good' lathe for its day. The Graziano, OTOH, at least plays "among" the 'great' lathes. Good deal more to that than just the bed.

    Bill


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