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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by divad View Post
    Thanks Charles I'll see what i can do, but can't promise ! next time i'm on a job i use them, it's using the video/computer that i struggle with !!!
    I understand there are many skills we need for our job and life, videos are not one of them most of us need. But even if you just do a short video of them on the bench or on a piece of scrap? As far as we know there is no video record of these tools so to have even a short one would be nice. Do whatever you feel comfortable with. Or ask your neighbor, perhaps they have a teenager who can help you out....

    Charles

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    Quote Originally Posted by bmikkalson View Post
    Any more pics, I googled but these appear to be rare as python feathers.

    I wanna say I seen one on eBay like a year ago. I remember thinking, it looked like a old drill. Of course now I know it was a golden nugget.
    Here you go dsc06709.jpgu[ATTACH=CONFIG]128044[/dsc06714.jpgATTACH]dsc06711.jpg

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  5. #23
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    What I found interesting is in the patent from 1946 they mention using tungsten carbide tipped blades...

    I wonder if these machines are sort of the pioneers of powered scraping... When did Biax or Renz start making them?

    There was also the Borel and Dunner Biax power scraper clone. Help!

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  7. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by RC99 View Post
    What I found interesting is in the patent from 1946 they mention using tungsten carbide tipped blades...

    I wonder if these machines are sort of the pioneers of powered scraping... When did Biax or Renz start making them?

    There was also the Borel and Dunner Biax power scraper clone. Help!
    Glad this has shaped up as it has.

    Shaft powered tools of this 'power' level - long before motors got smaller lighter, more powerful for a size and weight, and most of all, more durable for a given cost, were once more common for many purposes in large machine halls and on production lines. Automotive plants of the day had rows of them hanging from the overhead.

    Adding a reciprocating scraper to those that powered fastener drivers, power chisels, and scalers would have been easier at a time when the flex shafts themselves were already common and well developed technology.

    Good stuff - hope to see more of it...

    Bill

  8. #25
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    That integrated sharpener/lap is a nice looking feature.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gcude View Post
    That integrated sharpener/lap is a nice looking feature.
    Aye. Not only one less 'gadget' to have to carry, the very proximity of it encourages more frequent touch-ups.

    I can see the comfort advantage of the handgrip plus the longish 'tail' grip. One does wonder, though how the mass of that stout geared recip head compares with wotever a comparable Biax weighs, complete?

    Also a flex shaft of that power-handling capacity is not actually the most flexible beast in the room - certainly not compared to an electrical cord. Only a user can tell us, but does it also play a useful part in making the toolhead more stable?

    "Good in parts" it looks to be, but there are some disadvantages here, too.

    Bill

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Aye. Not only one less 'gadget' to have to carry, the very proximity of it encourages more frequent touch-ups.

    I can see the comfort advantage of the handgrip plus the longish 'tail' grip. One does wonder, though how the mass of that stout geared recip head compares with wotever a comparable Biax weighs, complete?

    Also a flex shaft of that power-handling capacity is not actually the most flexible beast in the room - certainly not compared to an electrical cord. Only a user can tell us, but does it also play a useful part in making the toolhead more stable?

    "Good in parts" it looks to be, but there are some disadvantages here, too.

    Bill
    Well thought out Bill ! and to be honest your not far of the mark; the machine is not difficult to operate and the flexi shaft is not particularly inhibiting , true it's not all that flexible, but on say a waist height job i find it kind of counterbalances the workhead. In the past if i have had to do any "in situ" high vertical work i have a desouter spring balance that i simply attach to the scraper and a suitable overhead anchor point. this has been a life saver on a few occasions as i'm a skinny little guy haha !!

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    Quote Originally Posted by divad View Post
    Well thought out Bill ! and to be honest your not far of the mark; the machine is not difficult to operate and the flexi shaft is not particularly inhibiting , true it's not all that flexible, but on say a waist height job i find it kind of counterbalances the workhead. In the past if i have had to do any "in situ" high vertical work i have a desouter spring balance that i simply attach to the scraper and a suitable overhead anchor point. this has been a life saver on a few occasions as i'm a skinny little guy haha !!
    Unfair advantage. Ten years in the joolery trade. Foredom flex shaft tools are all over the shop, have similar characteristics, even tiny impact hammers and graver-drivers for Florentining as well as rotating goods --- just writ in waaay smaller typeface.

    And I surely prefer them to the all-the-mass-in-one-hand Dremel & Sputnik tribe and clans. NEVER saw those in a production shop, Rockville or New York.

    Nicer yet to have 'all of the above' to-hand, of course.

    Bill

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    Hi Divad and welcome to the forum. Those flexible shaft style power scrapers were very popular in the UK in the old days. I've seen them being used in several factories, although I've never used one myself. I can see there being limitations regarding vertical work.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by divad View Post
    Hi all this is my first post here as i stumbled on this site while surfing the net.I was surprised to see so many posts regarding biax scrapers i had thought interest in such skills was almost extinct !!! I am a Mechanical Fitter by trade and over the years have done my share of scraping, not i might add to the extent of some on here ! I myself own 3 old type biax (fixed speed ) I can vouch that they are certainly quality machines,however my most favorite machine is actually British made of which i own two, these are now old machines from the 50's 60's. They were built in London by Coborn, I like to use them as the smooth operation while scraping is to me even superior to biax, they have a lovely balance, these don,t have an integral motor,but a separate motor driving a flexi-shaft driving an aluminium body scraper with fully adjustable stroke.An added bonus is the motor also carries a diamond wheel for on-site tip sharpening, one of my machines even has a radius attachment.AS they say "real old school quality ". Cheers guys.
    WOW. That is an awesome collection of power scrapers. Do you use them at work or is it more a collectors interest.
    As RC said there are many Aussies who have a strong interest in machine reconditioning and scraping as well. Most have been to one of the scraping courses in Melbourne over the last few years. You can check them out at the Metalwork forum (google it) ..... I hope it is Ok to mention that? I also would love to see them in action and hear about the sort of scraping that you do. Thanks for posting

  15. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by RC99 View Post
    What I found interesting is in the patent from 1946 they mention using tungsten carbide tipped blades...

    I wonder if these machines are sort of the pioneers of powered scraping... When did Biax or Renz start making them?

    There was also the Borel and Dunner Biax power scraper clone. Help!
    I bought one of those light weight scrapers several years ago and it vibrated and you pushed it.....I sold it on Ebay I think for around $100.00.....IMHO it was a non starter...Interesting and I know a few of you like the Renz Scraper, but again I have tried it and again I have not found anything that compares to a 50 year old BIAX scraper or Flaker. I will send BIAX and my friend Ed Dyjak who has probably sold more BIAX scrapers then anyone in the world outside the factory and DAPRA a link to this thread and see what they can tell us now. I held my first Biax in 1972....and the Anderson about the same time. My Dad told me he used a Anderson during WW 2 when he worked at a defense plant.
    I think this is the one I owned at one time. I was storing it down in Virginia and the company went belly up and the sucker never told me and it was sold at auction...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=98YKSKJyQHs

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    Quote Originally Posted by CBlair View Post
    That is often the case isnt it, one of the Anderson power scrapers was also on there a couple of years ago. Not interested in them myself but they dont show up very often.

    Charles
    Yes, it was a pole scraper. That must of been a year ago to. When I got started in this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard King View Post
    Ben you're kidding me right????

    How many do you want? I thought you knew I have been a BIAX / DAPRA Distributor and Scraping Instructor for over 30 years.
    Hahaha, I'm more looking for a rental than a purchase.:-)

  18. #34
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    I've thought of making a Anderson. There is a manual for sale. Should be as to copy design.

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    I emailed Coborn and they had the USA distributor call me. Precision International in Bloomfield CT, just down the street from DAPRA, small world.

    I was told by Neil Hollis the sales manager that the scraper is no longer being made, but there are some repair parts available. He told me the son of the inventor , John Innocent would love to see that people are still using and talking about his Dad's invention. I emailed asking if they would forward this forum link that I attached to John and if he could possibly write us a little history about his Fathers invention. When I hear back, I'll let everyone know.
    Rich

    Interesting link about Coborn's history. Scroll down the page to see the movie. Very cool how they speak about "hand made" tooling. News // COBORN ENGINEERING COMPANY LIMITED
    Last edited by Richard King; 01-23-2015 at 02:36 PM.

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  21. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by divad View Post
    Hi all this is my first post here as i stumbled on this site while surfing the net.I was surprised to see so many posts regarding biax scrapers i had thought interest in such skills was almost extinct !!! I am a Mechanical Fitter by trade and over the years have done my share of scraping, not i might add to the extent of some on here ! I myself own 3 old type biax (fixed speed ) I can vouch that they are certainly quality machines,however my most favorite machine is actually British made of which i own two, these are now old machines from the 50's 60's. They were built in London by Coborn, I like to use them as the smooth operation while scraping is to me even superior to biax, they have a lovely balance, these don,t have an integral motor,but a separate motor driving a flexi-shaft driving an aluminium body scraper with fully adjustable stroke.An added bonus is the motor also carries a diamond wheel for on-site tip sharpening, one of my machines even has a radius attachment.AS they say "real old school quality ". Cheers guys.
    Thanks Divad for introducing us to the Coborn machine. I was a bit skeptic at first when I read this post but I was off base and appreciate what you have giving us and apologize if I offended you. Rich, Pete and Phil and who did I forget are Mates down- under and I look forward to seeing more of your posts on what your rebuilding and scraping as I do there's. G'day. Rich

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  23. #37
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    Hello

    I also emailed Coborn with regards to the scraper and had the following response:

    “Coborn are very much still in Business, please see COBORN // Quality, British-Made, Diamond Tool Grinding & Laser Cutting Machines, whilst Coborn have made the active decision not to make the Scraper at this time, if there was genuine interest from professionals such as yourselves in this product, Coborn would consider restarting manufacture”.

    Will keep you posted.

    Julian

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    The Coborn story is interesting, it is a unique machine, cool and I would like to see and test one, but obviously I am not interested in buying one. Making products for rebuilding is not a real profitable one and I have discovered some hobbyists or small shops looking at rebuilding machines, like many are on here generally don't like to pay for new equipment and always looking for a bargain. When I was in Taiwan, I was told BIAX didn't need to worry about any Asian company making a power scraper as there is no volume or profit in making them. I would hate to see the Son of the inventor to get let down. They would have to make thousands to make a profit. I talked to the USA rep, and he told me they stopped producing the scrapers because low volume of sales. That is why BIAX's are so expensive, low volume and selling thru rep's they have to mark them up so high. If they do more power to them... Rich

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    Hi Divad and welcome to the forum. Those flexible shaft style power scrapers were very popular in the UK in the old days. I've seen them being used in several factories, although I've never used one myself. I can see there being limitations regarding vertical work.

    Regards Tyrone.
    Hi Tyrone Yes mate thats right i first saw them when i was an apprentice back in the UK, the local machine tool builders had them, thats when i first used a coborn. We used to hand scrape the machine tools at David Brown but when i got my hands on a coborn i thought "this is more like it" Cheers

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    Quote Originally Posted by mark123 View Post
    WOW. That is an awesome collection of power scrapers. Do you use them at work or is it more a collectors interest.
    As RC said there are many Aussies who have a strong interest in machine reconditioning and scraping as well. Most have been to one of the scraping courses in Melbourne over the last few years. You can check them out at the Metalwork forum (google it) ..... I hope it is Ok to mention that? I also would love to see them in action and hear about the sort of scraping that you do. Thanks for posting
    Hi i dont use them a great deal these days ,just the odd job now & then, i'm more involved industrial power transmission
    but as i,m a self employed contractor i sometimes get my arm twisted and fire the coborn/biax up.in the past i worked for rebuilders and machine tool dealers as well as engineering companies so the scrapers have been great to have.


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