Rambaudi V2 mill clean and repair
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    Default Rambaudi V2 mill clean and repair

    Hi everyone,
    Just got this rambaudi V2 mill delivered today and will start up a thread on clean up and repair just like i did on the okuma lathe project stay tuned.
    Let the fun begin.

    resize-img_6382.jpgresize-img_6383.jpgresize-img_6384.jpgresize-img_6385.jpgresize-img_6386.jpg

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    OK i remove the motor and milling head, the bearings in the motor are in great shape the spindle brake is working but not as it should be it is worn so will need to be replace, maybe i can retrofit one from a bridgeport mill The gears in the milling head look good as well but i only had a quick look at them, time will tell when i start cleaning but some of the taper bearings will need replacing. As you can see there is a lot of wood shavings inside the ram the owner told me he done some wood milling on the mill .

    Cheers,
    Mark.

    resize-img_6417.jpgresize-img_6419.jpgresize-img_6424.jpgresize-img_6428.jpgresize-img_6429.jpg

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    I remove the ram off today, wasn't easy there was hardly any lubrication om the ways so i use lots of WD40 so i could move the ram far enough to remove the T bolts. Then remove the table, there are a couple of oil holes that are blocked with gunk.

    resize-img_6442.jpgresize-img_6443.jpgresize-img_6444.jpgresize-img_6445.jpgresize-img_6448.jpg

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    Nice looking milling machine. I'd only position the machine backed into a corner like that if there was no possible alternative. It will limit you if you come to do any long work like keywaying shafts for instance.

    Regards Tyrone

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    Default Rambaudi V2 mill clean and repair

    That’s got some nice guts! What’s your feel for how worn(or not) things are. You going to be able to just clean it up and make chips with it?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

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    Thanks Tyrone,
    I found putting the mill in the corner use up the empty space, and looking at the mill front on i can cut a hole in the plaster wall if i had to As that side of the garage was block of for a small storage area.

    Cheers,
    Mark.

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    Yeah it's nice and heavy duty just how i like it Yes it has some wear on it, i suppose most machines do when there 50 years old. It will need some work, like replace some bearings the worm gear track for the ram has some broken teeth, once i start cleaning up all the parts we will see what else is worn out, but i feel she will be fine for making chips.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Turbine Builder View Post
    Thanks Tyrone,
    I found putting the mill in the corner use up the empty space, and looking at the mill front on i can cut a hole in the plaster wall if i had to As that side of the garage was block of for a small storage area.

    Cheers,
    Mark.
    Hi Mark, I had to do the same thing with a " Bridgeport " I worked on. I found being backed into a corner was limiting as I said. I didn't have the option of bashing a hole in the walls.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Turbine,

    Tell me a little more about the X-axis table movement mechanism. I'm accustomed to a leadscrew anchored to the table with a nut fixed to the saddle. Rambaudi is doing something, clearly heavy duty, but doesn't look anything like I'm used to. I see thrust bearings, possible backlash compensation and other recognizable components but I can't put them together in my head.

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    Hi TGTool,
    FYI Rambaudi M3 Milling Machines table has a half nut fastened to the underside of the table and running the length of it.

    resize-img_6363.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by TGTool View Post
    Turbine,

    Tell me a little more about the X-axis table movement mechanism. I'm accustomed to a leadscrew anchored to the table with a nut fixed to the saddle. Rambaudi is doing something, clearly heavy duty, but doesn't look anything like I'm used to. I see thrust bearings, possible backlash compensation and other recognizable components but I can't put them together in my head.
    It looks like a double worm drive. I used to work on large Hor bores that used the same method. Helical rack immersed in oil in the bed with a double back lash free worm driving the moving column. Combine that with hydrostatic ways and you had a winner.

    Great idea and it worked a treat, pretty expensive set up though. It's what they used before the advent of ball screws when N.C. Machines first came onto the market.

    You don't often see it on small machines though. That one is really nicely made and will drive as hard as Chinese Arithmatic.

    Edit You can see the idea more clearly on the latest photograph. " Rambaudi " have just inverted the method I described.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Thanks, an interesting scheme. I can imagine Rambaudi designed as they did so chips, if any, would fall away. Fully enclosed it wouldn't be an issue. And, I see they've nicely arranged X and Y handwheels to be in proximity rather than having to run round to the end of a table.

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    I have worked on several of these machines
    The feedmechanisme is not a worm
    Normaly you have a long spindle and short nut
    This is just the other way around A long 180dgr nut and a 2 piece short spindle
    With the 2piece spindle you can adjust backlash
    This enables you to have the handwheel on the front in handreach

    Peter

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter from Holland View Post
    I have worked on several of these machines
    The feedmechanisme is not a worm
    Normaly you have a long spindle and short nut
    This is just the other way around A long 180dgr nut and a 2 piece short spindle
    With the 2piece spindle you can adjust backlash
    This enables you to have the handwheel on the front in handreach

    Peter
    I get what you're saying there Peter. What would you say the difference was between a worm and a short length of leadscrew ?

    I have worked on plenty of other machines that have one of the long travel hand wheels on the front of the saddle. All you need is a bevel gear towards the end of the lead screw and a mating bevel gear on the hand wheel.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    A worm to me means a gear profile
    But if you want to call it a worm thats fine with me

    Peter

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter from Holland View Post
    A worm to me means a gear profile
    But if you want to call it a worm thats fine with me

    Peter
    You could well be right Peter. I never considered the worm profile.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    I remove the motor and gearbox , hand wheels from the table. I could not find a drain plug to drain the oil from the table so i stuff some rags to soak up the oil. There is a filler plug but no oil drain plug, my guess is after so many hours of operation the table is removed and the oil is pump out and the drive gears re grease

    resize-img_6459.jpgresize-img_6460.jpgresize-img_6461.jpg


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