Rambaudi V2 mill clean and repair - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Hi Chris,
    I took some measurements of the brake shoes 151mm wide with the liner material and 146mm without liner material and the shoe height 12mm.

    Cheers,
    Mark.

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    That leads me to believe that the brake shoes are made by some 3rd party supplier (not Rambaudi or TOS), and and can, or could, be bought in different thicknesses of shoe. Now, who that supplier is/was is unknown to me.

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    Finish the top coat on the main body of the mill. I had a problem when rolling out the final coat, the foam roller was leaving small air bubbles on some of the areas on the mill. so i gave it a light sanding with 800 grit sandpaper and use some fine automotive cut and polish.

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    Done the first coat of primer on the knee. Went out and got one of those airless spray guns, WOW it did the job really well and took me 5 minutes to paint. I will get most of the parts degrease and prep for painting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Turbine Builder View Post
    the foam roller was leaving small air bubbles on some of the areas on the mill.
    Old issue. Switch to the "fuzzy" ones. Visually, you'd expect them to be worse than foam, but the reverse is true.

    I no longer use foam AT ALL. The small fuzzy rollers and/or/else "sash" cut brushes (angle cut) cheap enough to discard rather than clean instead.

    Try a skosh of Flood Penetrol next opportunity. About one third to one half recommended mix. Full use and the paint flows out and levels nicely.

    But you'll need one, if not two, extra coats 'coz it goes THIN!

    Airless sprayer? Used 'em for years on fences, exterior and interior house painting. Went back to rollers, mostly. "In your face" at Big Box, but I had forgotten about them.

    If you got good results on a tall machine-tool component?

    Guess it is time I revisited the option.

    Thanks for that!

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  8. #46
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    Yes i was thinking of using the fuzzy ones, the videos i have seen people are using foam rollers. I guess the the airless sprayer have improve over the years. This one was $42 will see how we go with the final coats.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Turbine Builder View Post
    Yes i was thinking of using the fuzzy ones, the videos i have seen people are using foam rollers. I guess the the airless sprayer have improve over the years. This one was $42 will see how we go with the final coats.
    Dunno about "other people's videos", but if you put on yer magnifying spectacles and watch closely as you pull the roller, the foam has made a zillion "O" ring seals and pulls bubbles as it moves. Paint gets crater-wall rings if they burst, actual blisters if they do not burst.

    Down at the same "up-close-and-personal" level, see the fibrous ones pull strands and micro-strings of paint instead. These tend to either level-out or leave a rather useful mini "pebble grain" finish of fairly uniform and smooth "bumps". Careful re-rolling also smooths-out the fisheye pattern in "hammer" finish paints, Rust-Oleum's ones actually being VERY damned useful all-around. For a change. Wasn't otherwise much of a fan of their goods.

    One can play with paint consistency, degree of drying going on, and use multiple passes to take advantage of that for a rather nice effect. Resembles Corfam pebble-grain synthetic shoe leather.

    Works for me, partly 'coz it helps hide imperfections, but does NOT create dirt-traps as "wrinkle" finishes do.

    Mostly I have had large, flat surfaces, not curves and inside corners, so.. grain of salt. Can't work it to that effect EVERYWHERE.

    Others have mentioned spraying for a deliberate "orange peel", then top-coating that to blend it partially smooth and more easily cleaned. Different technique, similar "textured" result.

    2CW

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    Hello Mark,

    I am following your thread with great interest. Nice work...

    I have a question for you, as our mills are quite similar. Does your mill have a reversing switch for the quill, if you were power tapping, as an example?

    Mine does not. It does have a dual speed motor, as well as the back gear, but no reversing switch.

    Brian

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sachmanram View Post
    Hello Mark,

    I am following your thread with great interest. Nice work...

    I have a question for you, as our mills are quite similar. Does your mill have a reversing switch for the quill, if you were power tapping, as an example?

    Mine does not. It does have a dual speed motor, as well as the back gear, but no reversing switch.

    Brian
    Hi Brian,
    Thanks mate, i don't really know at this stage been pushing hard to get parts clean and painted. The owner told me when flicking the reversing switch it pop a fuse, so need to work on that once the mill is back together. Also have not study the manual as yet.

    Cheers,
    Mark.

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    I finally got the knee painted and the other parts and fitted back on the main body of the mill, i replace the two thrust bearings with new ones and found the shaft is bent will machine a new one once the mill is up and running. I'll get some new Flush Grease Zerk Nipple Fittings as i can not push oil through some of them. Next is cleaning and panting the drive motor and saddle and gearbox.

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    Work on the mill is progressing nicely no major problems at this stage. Have got another batch of parts painted in primer undercoat. Took the front cover off the gearbox and gave it a good clean inside, all the gears are in good shape and the shifting mechanism is in good shape as well, no cracks in the plastic parts.

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    OK gearbox and saddle are back on the mill, replace the thrust bearings the bearings in the gearbox are in good shape. Have some more parts that will need repairing or replace that will be in the next lot of photos.

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    Stated cleaning the ram and rack and pinion gear, there some teeth missing on the rack and the pinion gear is in bad shape.

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    That is the pad design part of these machines
    I did rebuild several of them and on all of them I tossed the coolant drain system
    Before grinding we filled up the slot on the underside of the table with a piece of cast iron to create a bigger surface

    We then drilld and tapped 2 holes into the side of the table and placed 2 hoses to drain the coolant

    Peter

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    Hi Peter,
    OK i see, was the coolant drain system problematic on the V2 mills ?? My mill has these channels bolted on the end of the saddle.

    resize-img_6667.jpgresize-img_6668.jpgresize-img_6669.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Hall View Post
    That leads me to believe that the brake shoes are made by some 3rd party supplier (not Rambaudi or TOS), and and can, or could, be bought in different thicknesses of shoe. Now, who that supplier is/was is unknown to me.
    Magnetti Marelli's name is still on brake pads one can buy in the present-day.

    Brake Pad Kits: Magneti Marelli Aftermarket NA | Magneti Marelli Aftermarket NA

    FIAT captive for much of their history, did many of the s**ty little jobs and pissing on fires well beyond magnetos in any Big Corp.

    Baruffaldi is also Italian, same greater Milano / Torino general industrial area, and making clutches and a lot more for machine-tools and other goods since 1927.

    Sometimes the "turd party" suppliers outlive more than one generation of customers. More often than not, they have earned that privilege the "hard way".

    BARUFFALDI - Mechanical Technologies since 1927

    Extract - timing is even right for an overlap into Rambaudi's own run:

    Baruffaldi started its business in the machine tools branch about 60 years ago with the manufacturing of mechanical clutches, followed by the electromagnetic brakes and clutches.
    There will be others. Northern Italians may remember. I paid more attention to good food, challenging roads, lovely sunlit lands, great wines, and interesting people. Parts, one just orders online!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Turbine Builder View Post
    Stated cleaning the ram and rack and pinion gear, there some teeth missing on the rack and the pinion gear is in bad shape.
    Mark,
    That's strange isn't it.
    I have always wondered if Italy is or was the rack-making capital of the world - I recall seeing (1990's) lots of sliding gates with long steel racks. They must have been cheap. The Italians certainly used to be able to produce sprockets, gears etc. at economical prices.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter S View Post
    Mark,
    That's strange isn't it.
    I have always wondered if Italy is or was the rack-making capital of the world - I recall seeing (1990's) lots of sliding gates with long steel racks. They must have been cheap. The Italians certainly used to be able to produce sprockets, gears etc. at economical prices.
    Italy was a melting pot of immigrant skilled craftsman even before metals were found worth the bother. BONE was the big deal vs wood and grasses, stone was in use, but a nuisance to work, by comparison.

    Used to be said that "no one knew where the Etruscans had gone". Calling a province "Tuscany" was an accident? Or what? DNA finally said they had gone nowhere much, actually. Still there. Some came to America. Most never left home.

    Similar backtrail, Basque country Spain and France. Ditto Anatolians-now-"Turks" working metals so long ago Sumer didn't yet have a water problem, Moses hadn't yet hit the funny papers, let alone Muhammad.

    Germany's largest component of Gastarbeiters had forebears at the metals game when local industry up North was still hunter-gatherer and fishing the Rhine instead of running even wooden rafts up and down it.

    Human skills are OLD. We just keep messing up the book-keeping, getting cross over cheating, running ruinous wars, then having to start over.
    Last edited by thermite; 05-14-2018 at 04:28 PM.

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