Refurbishing a Logan 200 Lathe - start to finish progress
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  1. #1
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    Default Refurbishing a Logan 200 Lathe - start to finish progress

    I am new to this forum, and have enjoyed the collective wisdom and am hoping to contribute some of my (new) experiences as I start using a Logan 200 lathe I just purchased and am refurbishing. The Logan 200 lathe I just purchased was first minted in 1940's yet it is all intact, but the paint has failed and I used this opportunity to rebuild and pack the bearings and paint.

    After reading (too much) I first option to strip the old paint was to use a (Harbor fright) soda blaster... well it worked but my lawn is not looking very happy about all the residual soda, and I am glad I had a class 3 respirator! So after my first few parts were stripped, I decided to try a chemical paint stripper... but as I reviewed the internet I saw a posting about using radially available and very affordable 'Easy Off" oven cleaner.

    So it worked... very well! https://youtu.be/N7zj2C29_ZM

    I will post more on the restoration as I progress.

    I hope this helps anyone considering a repaint and appreciate any feedback to better contribute.

    Here are some photos of the results:img_1746.jpgimg_1752.jpgimg_1754.jpgimg_1758.jpgimg_1760.jpg:

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    imageuploadedbytapatalk1426966709.270345.jpg

    Well the last of the easy off oven cleaner (3cans) got all the paint off (with a lot of white wheel effort) now the entire lathe has been disassembled and paint removed and wire wheel polished. Next is the metal cleaner : degreaser (prep) and then etcher (zinc solution) ... Then I have two primer sealer products I am going to try. One the Por-15 (silver ) the other is " Master series" (silver). Both claim to encapsulate rust (although I've taken it to bare metal already ) and prime and seal with a very durable urethane paint. Apparently the pot -15 is NOT UV protective (but I do not foresee and outdoor lathe work in the future) and the Master Series has a lot of aluminum in it. Both will be brushed on with two coats. This should make a durable and easy to clean lathe. Meanwhile I've re packed the bearings checked the gears and ways etc. I'll be updating the motor and fed /rev drum switch with belts and associated rubber parts. Glad all that paint stripping and wire brush is over.

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    logan-200-lathe-1942-serial-number.jpglogan-lathe-chip-pan-stripped.jpglogan-lathe-head-stripped.jpg

    Now that all the paint has been removed, wire brushed - tomorrow I will begin metal prep (cleaner) and etching - then paint! I will be using POR-15 for the lathe, and Master series for the chip pan, legs and covers. Both are "silver" and have primer and sealer incorporated, very durable polyurethane paint that should hold-up to the rigors of lath work and easy to clean. I have repacked the head bearing (in excellent condition) and masked the critical components. I had to order a forward / reverse (Dayton) drum switch that was missing. I looked up the serial number and looks like the lathe was made in 1942 (in really great shape!!)

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    Who-ah! after so much effort in soda blasting, paint stripping, wire wheel'n I am now in the final steps to paint... cleaning the metal and prepping the metal, then (wait for it)... Paint! I exchanged the "silver" POR-15 for "grey" and ordered a second quart anticipating the need, especially as the paint expert explained, once you open a can, many customers are never able to un-cap the can again! and a quart seems pretty little amount, but as it turned out I quart can do the entire lathe! Bad news is that they only had one quart so I ordered another (for the second coat) and the Master Series is taking more than week to arrive so I may end up using just POR-15 on this project.

    I have heard negative things about POR-15 when people did not follow the instructions using the three-steps (Cleaner, mental prep and paint... so I did EXACTLY as instructed, including (water) washing between processes and air drying completely before paint. The cleaner was simple, and the metal Prep once dried left a grey (whitish) zinc oxide (etching) that also cleaned off residue paint and neutralized the (surface) rust.

    Since clean-up seemed to be a challenge, I opted with card board table top, nitrile gloves and disposal cheap-o paint brush. The paint went on smoothly, adhered to the zinc oxide prepared surface and brush lines dissipated as the paint started flowing. It looks almost as if it was air-sprayed! I wanted to put it on thin, but the course iron casting sucked-up paint I ended up using a fairly thick first coat, and will 220 wet-sand before the second coat later this week. Here are the photos and a video of the required steps and products for the POR-15.

    I am very pleased with the grey color. It looks like factory!

    img_1804.jpgimg_1806.jpgimg_1809.jpgimg_1811.jpgimg_1812.jpg


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    Before I do the second coat I will wet-sand the freshly painted first-coat with 220 grit sandpaper. Since the color great, and second coat will be the final coat, and re-assembly begins. (yaa!) so many steps but this lathe has survived from 1942 and with this new refurbished paint, grease and realignment, it will be (better than) new.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_1809.jpg  

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    Looks nice!

    Andy

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    Thank you for sharing and especially for putting in enough detail to make it interesting and educational. What is the open time for the paint?

    Charles

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    Looks good! I'm restoring my Logan 820 right now. You learn alot about your machine when you take the time to pull and refinish every nut and bolt. Mine's held up until I can bore and sleeve a few points in the QC gearbox.

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    I'd thought of using that paint as well, sounds like the right stuff. It offers a glimmer of hope - I've all but given up on paint, figuring i'll make them mechanically perfect and forget about appearances because the just end up like before after 6 months of coolant and chips.

    Really interested to hear how the POR 15 holds up and glad to know it goes on so nicely

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    NIce job OP!

    I didn't use por15 but I used a very similar product by KBS Coatings called Rustseal, same idea- ultra high solids 100% urethane, darn near indestructible and sheds everything, I applied it directly over bare cast iron in two coats, the first thinned( with their thinner) to get penetration and good adhesion, the second coat heavy, it looks like hell when you first apply it, relax and let it flow out...looks almost like porcelain when cured.

    The catch is once you open it you have to use it,it will harden in just a few hours when exposed to air and achieve full cure in 24 hours.
    If you use it buy the small cans. And just as stated by the OP forget about cleaning anything, and do wear gloves - if it dries on your skin only time will get it off.

    i started using the stuff to replace powder coating on motorcycle frames and found it was actually tougher and far less prone to chipping.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CBlair View Post
    Thank you for sharing and especially for putting in enough detail to make it interesting and educational. What is the open time for the paint?

    Charles
    Hey Charles, thanks for the kudus... regarding the paint dry time, well I let it dry 24 hours and MAN was it not only dry, it adhered to the prepared metal like glass, and was impossible "easily" scratch as I had a heck of a time to pry it from the cardboard that has contact surface. My very skeptical friend was very impressed, as am I. It is "slick" so chips will be really easy to wipe off, exactly what I was hoping to achieve.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iwananew10K View Post
    NIce job OP!

    I didn't use por15 but I used a very similar product by KBS Coatings called Rustseal, same idea- ultra high solids 100% urethane, darn near indestructible and sheds everything, I applied it directly over bare cast iron in two coats, the first thinned( with their thinner) to get penetration and good adhesion, the second coat heavy, it looks like hell when you first apply it, relax and let it flow out...looks almost like porcelain when cured.

    The catch is once you open it you have to use it,it will harden in just a few hours when exposed to air and achieve full cure in 24 hours.
    If you use it buy the small cans. And just as stated by the OP forget about cleaning anything, and do wear gloves - if it dries on your skin only time will get it off.

    i started using the stuff to replace powder coating on motorcycle frames and found it was actually tougher and far less prone to chipping.
    Ya the paint store had a can where the person did not head the advice of very carefully cleaning the lid and can top so NO PAINT remained when closed... I had a bit left over from the first day, and the next day I could open it no problem and it was still liquid. I planned to use it all at once, but to my surprise it took exactly one quart to do the entire lathe! and the brush strokes disapeared and it was exactly as you described, like porcelain! Very impressive and I am wondering if I need to do a second quart (as I have to san-odd the "sheen" so the second coat will adhere... and frankly I'm sick of all this prep work!

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    Default 1 quartof POR-15 did the entire lathe!

    After letting the first batch of painting the lathe dry (24 hours), I was delighted to see the glassy smooth and wicket hard paint result! A very skeptical friend revised his opinion once he say the results! The paint store encouraged me to use all the paint (quart) at once so I had the majority of the lathe prepped and I still had some left over... so it is VERY IMPORTANT to clean the can lip and lid entirely of ANY pain... else it will be sealed for life!

    When I came back to the remaining pars (chip pan, legs, and motor counter) the remains of the can was the perfect amount to complete the project. So to my surprise, one quart of POR-15 is enough to completely paint the lathe!

    I am wondering about the need for a second coat since if I opt to do this I have to sand (600 grit) the entire "shine" so the second coat will adhere... argh I'm sick of sanding and this stuff is really on hard, and covered entirely! the only problem is it stuck to the card board so hard I need to file off the card board!!! so some light retouching will be required at least so I will have a chance to see how (some) second coat works, or if is even needed!

    Here are more photos of last night's work. (Thanks for the response everyone)
    img_1818.jpgimg_1819.jpgimg_1820.jpgimg_1821.jpg

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    I would say as long as you have complete coverage no need for the 2nd coat.
    Looks good to me.
    You'll love it, it practically cleans itself.

    PS- for anyone wondering, yes it is better than Polane.

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    Glad to hear that a second coat would not be needed! I still need to file off the cardboard that stuck to a few spots. I'll be doing the saddle and polishing the handles. Slow progress.

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    One coat of POR is sufficient in my experience-I've done two lathes with it.

    Put some saran wrap under the lid to keep it from sticking.

    Scott

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    Quote Originally Posted by svs View Post
    One coat of POR is sufficient in my experience-I've done two lathes with it.

    Put some saran wrap under the lid to keep it from sticking.

    Scott
    That is great advise (too late now) but I am going to file off the card board and will use saran wrap of needed on areas that touch. Man this is hard paint!
    img_1830.jpg

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    Default Need help setting up the forward / reverse drum switch on my split phase motor

    The challenges keep coming as I discovered that the "Powr-Kraft" (Montgomery Wards) 1/4 HP 1725 RPM Split Phase motor that came with the lathe was missing the "drum switch" to allow forward and reverse. So I bought a Dayton (2X441A) drum switch, and see that my motor only has two wires, and the back of the motor mentioned "switching polarity of the wires to reverse direction.

    Hum, this seems simple enough, but I'm once again hoping someone has the wisdom to make sure I don't fry the motor (or myself!).

    I read about how to set this up IF my motor had 4 wires to set-up, but it does not (see photos). I appreciate the help and will make sure to post the results once I figure this out. Thanks in advance.

    img_1826.jpgimg_1827.jpgimg_1828.jpgimg_1832.jpgimg_1833.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by lo7us View Post
    The challenges keep coming as I discovered that the "Powr-Kraft" (Montgomery Wards) 1/4 HP 1725 RPM Split Phase motor that came with the lathe was missing the "drum switch" to allow forward and reverse. So I bought a Dayton (2X441A) drum switch, and see that my motor only has two wires, and the back of the motor mentioned "switching polarity of the wires to reverse direction.

    Hum, this seems simple enough, but I'm once again hoping someone has the wisdom to make sure I don't fry the motor (or myself!).

    I read about how to set this up IF my motor had 4 wires to set-up, but it does not (see photos). I appreciate the help and will make sure to post the results once I figure this out. Thanks in advance.

    img_1826.jpgimg_1827.jpgimg_1828.jpgimg_1832.jpgimg_1833.jpg
    You should repost this question in the General subforum, this subforum isnt really intended for discussions on electrical or general repairs. You did a really nice job documenting your painting though, and thanks again for doing it. I know a lot of people who will appreciate your comments.

    Charles

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    Thanks, but after studying the switch and reading way too much about split phase motors, I'm confident I figured out how to wire this set up.

    Now I've been testing the best way to scrap off the cardboard where the paint dried... Lives looks like box cutters will work


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