Respraying Polane?
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    Default Respraying Polane?

    I've got a mill that needs a bit of touchup to its Polane B (Sherwin Williams isocyanate) paint job.
    Don't ask why I care, I just do.

    Does anybody know how to spray Polane over Polane? Can I get away with lightly sanding the surface and respraying the top coat? Do I need to re-prime it? Is it possible to get good adhesion to Polane at all?

    I tried calling Sherwin Williams tech support, but they've gotten touchy about the really toxic stuff and wouldn't talk to me about Polane if I didn't have an account with them.

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    Key and re-clean the surface, then respray. It's what the car body shops do. Obviously prime/high-build if there are bare bits.

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    The body shops don't use Polane. It has a very high chemical resistance - cheaper paints (Rustoleum for example) just don't stick well to it. I've never tried to respray it before, so I just don't know if it'll get a good bond to itself.

    If it was a normal auto paint then I'd do just like you say. I don't know that Polane won't respond to the same treatment, but I'm hoping someone else has had either success or failure doing it before I try it.

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    Id imagine itd be fine as mark suggests. Only thing id add is preclean (solvent based) before scuffing, wipe again, tack down then have at it. Industrial 2k is usually sticky af.
    At a glance theres plenty of data out there, just google the application guide.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tom_boctou View Post
    If it was a normal auto paint then I'd do just like you say. I don't know that Polane won't respond to the same treatment, but I'm hoping someone else has had either success or failure doing it before I try it.
    I resprayed the inside of my lathe enclosure and it didn't hold up all that great anyhow.

    I would never do that again. It's just paint, who cares. Match it with automotive enamel or something. Polane is some truly bad stuff.

    Your lungs, your decision.

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    With appropriate ventilation and suitable Rppe, his lungs will be at all but zero risk.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Demon73 View Post
    With appropriate ventilation and suitable Rppe, his lungs will be at all but zero risk.
    I shoot isocynates wearing a surplus Boeing 727 pilot's oxygen mask (with replaceable saran wrap over the face shield), fed by a leaf blower on the other end of a loooong shop vacuum hose, which breathes from outside the other end of the shop. I figure that I'm safe if I can't smell any solvent.

    I used to use an industrial emergency ammonia respirator with the belt-mounted filter cartridge replaced with a hose to the remote air, but the rubber on that one finally succumbed to solvents and ozone.

    Not exactly OSHA compliant, but at least I'm pretty sure that THAT isn't what's going to kill me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    I would never do that again. It's just paint, who cares.
    The mill is in my living room, I want it to be pretty.

    I'll take a closer look at the online documentation. I didn't think I'd seen anything about respraying, but maybe I don't need to think about it this hard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tom_boctou View Post
    I shoot isocynates wearing a surplus Boeing 727 pilot's oxygen mask (with replaceable saran wrap over the face shield), fed by a leaf blower on the other end of a loooong shop vacuum hose, which breathes from outside the other end of the shop. I figure that I'm safe if I can't smell any solvent.

    I used to use an industrial emergency ammonia respirator with the belt-mounted filter cartridge replaced with a hose to the remote air, but the rubber on that one finally succumbed to solvents and ozone.

    Not exactly OSHA compliant, but at least I'm pretty sure that THAT isn't what's going to kill me.
    Thats about it, good job

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    Quote Originally Posted by tom_boctou View Post
    The mill is in my living room, I want it to be pretty.
    Could we get a pic please

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    We are continuously rebuilding machine tools that are finished with Polane B. Repaint is no big deal. Inexperienced painters will often get excessive orange peal or spatter. We demand an automotive quality finish. To reshoot, sand with 600 grit until no evidence of flaws. OK to dry sand if using premium, non clogging paper. Using lint free towels wipe down with Axalta Final Clean. Go ahead and repaint. Polane can be tricky to get a smooth, high gloss. Research alternate, slower drying reducers recommended by Sherwin Williams. We use a Devilbiss Tekna Copper, HVLP gun. Spray at 30 PSI on your inlet gauge. Hold gun 10"-12" away from surface. Adjust discharge volume to lay down wet without getting runs. Balancing act. Consider for Fisheyefilter.com is any moisture in lines. Lastly, don't take advise from goobers with no first hand experience. Good luck!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 10 fingers View Post
    We are continuously rebuilding machine tools that are finished with Polane B. Repaint is no big deal. Inexperienced painters will often get excessive orange peal or spatter. We demand an automotive quality finish. To reshoot, sand with 600 grit until no evidence of flaws. OK to dry sand if using premium, non clogging paper. Using lint free towels wipe down with Axalta Final Clean. Go ahead and repaint. Polane can be tricky to get a smooth, high gloss. Research alternate, slower drying reducers recommended by Sherwin Williams. We use a Devilbiss Tekna Copper, HVLP gun. Spray at 30 PSI on your inlet gauge. Hold gun 10"-12" away from surface. Adjust discharge volume to lay down wet without getting runs. Balancing act. Consider for Fisheyefilter.com is any moisture in lines. Lastly, don't take advise from goobers with no first hand experience. Good luck!
    Hows it do with a holding coat?

    "Lastly, don't take advise from goobers with no first hand experience."
    Aint that the truth.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tom_boctou View Post
    The mill is in my living room, I want it to be pretty.
    If you want it to be pretty, then don't use Polane. They don't spray Aston-Martins with Polane. Or Bentleys. It's not that great, and it doesn't hold up that much better than normal old automotive paint.

    Quote Originally Posted by Demon73 View Post
    "Lastly, don't take advise from goobers with no first hand experience."
    Aint that the truth.
    So have you sprayed Polane, Demon ? And had it on a machine you used, so you could see how well it held up ?

    I have. It wasn't that impressive in service. It certainy was that arfing destructive on the lungs, and I thought I had an okay setup

    I don't see the attraction. It doesn't work that well, while having to wear a moon suit to use it and pump in oxygen from Utah should tell you something. Where do you think all that overspray goes, and what about the leftovers, and the thinner, and everything else involved ? It's not worth it. We really don't need to poison the fucking planet any more than we already do, and if the machine is just going to sit in the living room, it's a lot of bad for zero good.

    Maybe humans ought to be a little bit responsible, for a change.

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    Default Work like a professional.

    [QUOTE=Demon73;3665658]Hows it do with a holding coat?

    Perfect. No different than flow coating. All the work is in prep. We media blast castings. Grind smooth with 60 grit discs. Skim with premium body filler. Not the cheap, easy sanding crap that is mostly talc. Block smooth with 220 such that the filler only remains in casting flaws. Shoot with 2 heavy coats of self etching primer. Primer is sandable. Start with 220, and finish with 600. Finish with Polane B. Will yield a spectacular, automotive finish. Can beat the snot out of it with a dead blow hammer to no effect.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 10 fingers View Post
    Can beat the snot out of it with a dead blow hammer to no effect.
    Too bad chips are not the same as a dead-blow hammer. Chips wear it right off.

    But if it's going to be sitting in the living room, spray away. And poison everything within fifty yards. Good plan.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    If you want it to be pretty, then don't use Polane. They don't spray Aston-Martins with Polane. Or Bentleys. It's not that great, and it doesn't hold up that much better than normal old automotive paint.


    So have you sprayed Polane, Demon ? And had it on a machine you used, so you could see how well it held up ?

    I have. It wasn't that impressive in service. It certainy was that arfing destructive on the lungs, and I thought I had an okay setup

    I don't see the attraction. It doesn't work that well, while having to wear a moon suit to use it and pump in oxygen from Utah should tell you something. Where do you think all that overspray goes, and what about the leftovers, and the thinner, and everything else involved ? It's not worth it. We really don't need to poison the fucking planet any more than we already do, and if the machine is just going to sit in the living room, it's a lot of bad for zero good.

    Maybe humans ought to be a little bit responsible, for a change.
    Hmmm, I dont remember shooting Polane in my 15 year stint of spraying shit for a living EG, although as easy as walking id no doubt have its measure in about 10 minutes, because actual experience.
    No moon suit required and tbf in an appropriate situation no Rppe required either, the op has it right, cant smell it = no problem, not that id expect you to understand that of course . As for the overspray, around 80 to 90% of the solids ends up stuck on the exhaust scrubbers, course n fine in any modest upwards setup, because actual experience.

    So what was you standing there in in clouds of overspray? Oooo the bad paint, it be destructive on mi lungs!!!


    or maybe

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    Quote Originally Posted by 10 fingers View Post

    Perfect. No different than flow coating. All the work is in prep. We media blast castings. Grind smooth with 60 grit discs. Skim with premium body filler. Not the cheap, easy sanding crap that is mostly talc. Block smooth with 220 such that the filler only remains in casting flaws. Shoot with 2 heavy coats of self etching primer. Primer is sandable. Start with 220, and finish with 600. Finish with Polane B. Will yield a spectacular, automotive finish. Can beat the snot out of it with a dead blow hammer to no effect.
    Ah by holding coat I mean 'dryish first coat'. We dont know the OPs situation, ie im guessing hes not rocking 20c plus in a booth so we dont want that paint ending up on the floor flooding it on from the get go. Some systems get real long and peely with a holding coat. Not that it should really matter, its a machine tool not a Bentley bonnet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Demon73 View Post
    Hmmm, I dont remember shooting Polane ...
    So you don't know what the fuck you're talking about. There's a reason Sherwin-Wiliams is quiet as a church mouse about that product. I'm surprised they still sell it.

    I'VE USED IT. ONCE. IT IS SOME BAD SHIT.

    For a machine that's intended to sit in the living room, it's incredibly dumb to go anywhere near the stuff.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    So you don't know what the fuck you're talking about. There's a reason Sherwin-Wiliams is quiet as a church mouse about that product. I'm surprised they still sell it.

    I'VE USED IT. ONCE. IT IS SOME BAD SHIT.

    For a machine that's intended to sit in the living room, it's incredibly dumb to go anywhere near the stuff.
    Come off the stage EG, you are clearly clueless to anyone with an ounce of experience in the field!

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    If you want it to be pretty, then don't use Polane. They don't spray Aston-Martins with Polane. Or Bentleys. It's not that great, and it doesn't hold up that much better than normal old automotive paint.
    .....So have you sprayed Polane, Demon ? And had it on a machine you used, so you could see how well it held up ?
    Obviously mileage varies.

    Try pouring some acetone or nitro-methane fuel on your car and wipe it off after a few minutes.
    All the safety things needed most certainly a pain in the butt for a touch-up. When you go to sand it for the blend you will know this is not automotive paint.
    Not used on most auto because it does not have the "color depth" of car finishes. Popular on airplanes and some trucks and trailers due to life.

    In my experience it (or the variants from other sources) makes a very big difference on my machine tools as to coolant resistance, wear resistance, and overall life.
    I'd say easy 5 to 1 life increase.

    Yes it is a huge pain to setup for the painting and surface prep/priming must be done not only well but great. Blow this step and not so good results.
    It is also not so easy to spray and cleanup of the equipment afterwards is such a pain that I got into the habit of just tossing the gun in the trash after a machine painted.

    I think it great long lasting paint but not for those without experience in other types first. You can put it on with a brush or roller but this very hard to get too look right.
    Prep, prep, prep underneath this type paint is so important. It is rock hard and if the under not right game over.
    Bob


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