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Thread: Showcase Lathe

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    Default Showcase Lathe

    I have convinced my wife that a lathe can be art, and that art should be displayed in our home.

    Her standards are high though, along the lines of this restored lathe.

    I could acomplish this with low temperature powder coat, but that might still distort the castings. Does anyone know how this finish was achieved? Hard work and block sanding of course, but what products and any other tricks than hard work were used?

    6afd71c00d71818deaad69adc368f82b.jpg

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    I would stay away from powdercoat. I think it looks like plastic, since it is...
    No substitute for filler and sanding primer if you want something that smooth looking. Dont forget the pinstripes, read the southbend von dutch thread for ideas there.

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    I had no idea there was a thread for that particular lathe. Thanks.

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    There is no way I'm going attempt even 1% of what a master pinstriper like Von Dutch did.

    On the positive side at least it's small then a car. I'll also move it into the shop after a year and use it, so I can't make it too pretty. Just enough to pass muster with the wife.

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    Quote Originally Posted by leop View Post

    I could acomplish this with low temperature powder coat, but that might still distort the castings.
    I am not taking sides on the powder coat question. But, I can say that the temperatures involved in baking powder coat are very unlikely to distort the castings. Temperatures on the order of 1000 F + are required to achieve relaxation of iron castings.

    Denis

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    I hope you are not planning to use it indoors......she wont be amused at the first curly steel bit she finds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    I hope you are not planning to use it indoors......she wont be amused at the first curly steel bit she finds.
    Nope, not planing to use inside. It will be in the corner of my den.

    The machine ways are pretty worn as well, so it would not be my first pick for making parts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dgfoster View Post
    I am not taking sides on the powder coat question. But, I can say that the temperatures involved in baking powder coat are very unlikely to distort the castings. Temperatures on the order of 1000 F + are required to achieve relaxation of iron castings.

    Denis
    Thanks Denis. I had heard of much lower temperatures being a problem.

    What I like about the powder coat is that they now have powder coat primers. They go on thick, and then you can sand them down to get a uniform finish. In many cases the thick application eliminates the need for body filler. To me body filler on a machine tool sounds like it would crack and chip over time.

    You can paint or bake on a final coat powder over the primer.

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    Hendey 14 by 6 Tie-Bar Rehab
    Hendey Lathe and Patrick Black

    This one turned out pretty good. I think it all boils down to surface prep; lots of sanding, primer, and a little well placed filler. More than one coat of quality paint is a must too.

    I know you're wanting to make a show machine, but I see it more from a practical aspect. Paint creates a smooth surface that's easier to keep clean, and a good paint job can also have a big influence on operators moral, respect for the tools, and pride in their work.

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    Just for fun, after it's in the den for awhile, start asking if you can move it into the bedroom.....

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