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  1. #21
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    Crank it out as far as you can go in both directions and take a flash light and look at the ways. The saddle is heavy and you will need to use a engine lift or a friend to help. I need to look at the booklet. will add more later

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  3. #22
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    Don't lift it with not taking out the cross feed screw because if you bend something it is a bugger to get things back straight.

    http://www.vintagemachinery.org/pubs/3348/6031.pdf

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  5. #23
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    Thanks for the help. I will look into the cross feed screw. I plan to order some proper way oil asap. A 30 wt way oil was recommended earlier in this thread. I also just bought a craftex cx601 mill. Its very similar to a g0704. I am wondering if a 30wt way oil will be good for both applications or if i should purchase something else as well. Im trying to only order once for now.

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    Qt{ A 30 wt way oil was recommended earlier } likely I recommended 30wt.

    Good to find an older tool supply store in your neighborhood because they often have what you need and enough experience to give some advice.
    Some machines call for 30w, some 20wt, (i use 30 when in doubt) and many oil filled spindle 10 wt.

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  8. #25
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    I would say Mobil Vactra 2 or way lube 68 (same thing) Way lube is sticky and will stay in there and not run off like plain old motor oil. $46.00 for a gallon...should last you years
    . https://www.mscdirect.com/product/de...32&hdrsrh=true

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    I have looked a fair amount and have yet to find a local machine supply shop open on weekends. I work out of town and all the local (edmonton alberta) shops seem to only be open while im at work. For now it seems easier to order online. I did play with the grinder a bit more but i have been unsuccessful so far. I plan to try some more tomorrow and mount a dro on my mill (hopefully) if anyone has any suggestions on how to get that saddle off i would love to hear them. If I am successful i will post more pics. I appreciate everyones help so far. I have been scowering older threads and have already found a bunch of great info. I could see myself spending alot of time on here in the future.

  10. #27
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    It looks like the bracket that bolts under the saddle would have to be losened. also looks like the end of the lead screw has a nut. If your unsure then ask a friend who is mechanically inclined to help. If he can repair a car he can figure this out. it maybe a bit more then you can do if you can't figure out how to do it..
    Last edited by Richard King; 07-14-2019 at 01:20 PM.

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  12. #28
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    Ok. I got the saddle off and progressed a bit more on the disassembly. It seems there is some kind of internal oiler pump and some extra parts for the old automation function. These ways look much better. There was some evidence of lithium grease in these ways. I think I will take this machine apart as much as possible to fully rebuild it and learn how it works. I will put on a one shot oiler if I can find one that is suitable. I did notice one of the bolt holes on the saddle bracket was broken off. It seems that this has been apart before which isnt suprising. If you guys see anything or have any comments or suggestions please let me know. Any idea where to source some missing parts. (Oil fittings and lines, grease fittings etc.) Im not going to lie Richard your comment really motivated me to figure this out. I dont like the idea of not being capable of something, for better or worse I will get this thing apart. Thanks for your help so far.
    20190714_142923.jpg20190714_142930.jpg20190714_143038.jpg20190714_142938.jpg20190714_144041.jpg

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  14. #29
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    Based on what I have heard so far on several forums the general consensus is that the ways are worn and could be re scraped. I have also heard that if the travel is smooth it may be best to leave it for now. Basically I don't have a ton of funds to throw at it right now so if the cost to have it re done is significant I would need to do it on my own. I have no experience at this and I think there is a chance I make it worse. I am wondering if anyone has a rough idea of the cost to get this done and whether or not it is worth it for my application. I will further disassemble it this weekend to expose the vertical ways and hopefully find any remaining flaws so I can start ordering parts to get things up and running. I'm still looking for a good place to source small parts like the oil filler tops and fittings if anyone has any recommendations I would appreciate it. Thanks

    regardless of what I decide I still intend to clean and properly lubricate it to get it running as good as I can for now.

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    I think it not a good idea to tear down the vertical parts if the machine has not been left out of doors. Very likely there is nothing you can do for that and likely it is fine. You should set the wheel on a piece of wood and down feed to just feel the free spin in the vertical nut. half turn is still safe and OK. Past 3/4 and you need to worry about the wheel locking up/ i even heard of a head falling(don't know it that was true)
    If you can find a machine repair guy to come over and do a Chicago fake scrape, as Richard called it that would be good. If you have a machine repair shop in Alberta I'm sure you could find a guy to do that. Likely cost only 50 or 100 bucks. The oil scrape is just making son=me rows of scrapes so the oil has place to go and is not rung out by parts fitting so close there is no room for oil. If you had the likes of an old cast iron surface plate you could get good enough to do it your self in short time.

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  17. #31
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    Thanks for the advice. Ill see if i can take a look at some of the vertical mech without fully dismantling it. If i can find someone to come over and do a quick scrape job for even close to that price I will do it. Ill start calling around. If im understanding you correctly you dont think the vertical ways will need any attention?

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    With the machine apart and decent walk around space it is not a big job. you can go on you tube and get the jest of it, but better to have a machine hand come do it for you. After the scrapes are made you take a flat knife and take off the bugs..a fine hard oil hone can do this also with the idea to have no bugs or burrs in the ways when the machine is put back together.

    50 or 100 bucks a retire guy working on the side...a regular machine repair shop service call likely more

    You want to say just some scrape, flaking for oil so they know it is not a real scraping job... That cost big bucks bet is well worth it.

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  20. #33
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    If you get lucky and find someone who can scrape it, drive it to him Also the little troughs at the end of the base V ways were to keep the way oil from running on the floor. Many times the old machines used a gravity feed oil reservoir and though white felt as a filter and slow the oil down or so it slowly wicked out the holes on top of the saddle top to the base ways. If you can't find a rebuilder, I can help you like I helped Ballen hand scrape the ways. I can email you photo's of a hand scraper you can make from $10.00 of steel. I felt bad saying that about not being able to take it apart, but see a kick in the pants worked...:-). As you discovered it's not as hard as one thinks, one just needs to get the courage, be a detective and do it. Good night and good job, Rich
    Last edited by Richard King; 07-16-2019 at 07:50 AM.

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  22. #34
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    Thanks for all your help Richard. Ill make some calls and see what I can find out. If i am unsuccessful i guess i better learn how to scrape a bit.

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    There you go.. you can’t beat Richards good advice. Add oil scraps according to Richards instruction, do a supper good job of cleaning the reassembly parts so little/no chance of grits and bugs in the reassembly.
    That is what I like about scraped oil way machines, very often you can make them good to perfect again.
    I like to oil-up and run a machine for a bit after scraping before grinding the chuck.. So, if you have some work you can rough in and put a few hours, or what on the grinder before grinding the chuck that may be good.
    Read up on chuck grinding here and have a 46 or courser wheel, running wet and taking plenty of time. Some guys like a 36 grit wheel for chucks. H,I, J, K, l is often good for a 46 or 36 wheel. ( I mostly like a k or L but that depends on the manufactures name.

    From some of the chucks and machines seen here it may be a good Idea to clean the chuck pad and reset the chuck. Find that information here on PM. Agree the grinder may be close after just oil scalps and you might not need grind the chick .

    I think you cant beat the coolness of a white aluminum oxide wheel. I had a Radiac pink wheel that ran super cool but can't off hand remember the grit and grade.

    looks like you are doing a great job of tear down..

    Job that I have done for years with a 46-k Norton, I tried a 46-L Carborundum bought at auction and the c46L runs much cooler, go figuer you never know about wheels.

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  25. #36
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    Thanks, I will likely order a few wheels to experiment. Once I find one that works for my application (hardened stainless steel 62HRC and titanium 6AL4V 40ish HRC) I will be sure to post it up for others to see. Everyone has been very helpful so far and made this whole task seem a little less daunting. I am starting to learn that surface grinding is much more complicated than I initially realized. Normally I buy new machines to avoid this kind of thing but a new surface grinder is quite costly so I think this is worth the hassle. It is cool to see how it works and get to tear it down. Hopefully it is operational soon so I can carry on with my project. I have been keeping very busy lately which I'm sure is very common around here.

  26. #37
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    I don't recall if I told you this, but I have a great student who you could load the saddle and table in a pick-up or on a skid and take it to Carr's Machining Ltd. | Machining, Welding, Fabricating & Balancing Shane Carr as he could cut and flake the ways and show you how to do it by hand so you could do it back home. My geography for Canada isn't super, so it maybe to far. If not read Ballens post...you can scroll to the part where we talked about scraping.

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  28. #38
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    Thanks for the info, I checked and it seems he is about 13 hours away. I will look around locally and see if anyone can do this. If not I will either learn or just reassemble the machine for now (after cleaning and repair) and see how it operates. With any luck I will get to work on it this weekend a bit in between other things I need to get done. I will read the info on here regarding the process and do some research regardless. I will post some more pics this weekend and report any findings. I expect to have to do a complete overhaul of the oiler and I will hopefully at least get a parts list ready so I can start sourcing stuff during the week after work.

    In your opinion what is a fair price to get this done? (if that question is even possible to answer with the info I have provided) and if I cant find someone to do it should I do it myself regardless or reassemble the machine after cleaning to get a baseline of where I'm at? Is there a significant improvement in performance and longevity with an amateur scrape job? I am more than willing to put in the work and learn but I want to be reasonably sure it will result in an overall improvement that justifies the delay in my project.

    Hopefully my rambling makes some sense. I'm just trying to understand my options a bit better and have an idea of the pros and cons of each decision. Thanks.

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    Smooth way surfaces tend to ring out the oil and so more wear is the result along with hard turning. A row of scrapes at an angle perhaps every 2 or 3" along the flat would be at least something. With the machine so apart it would be a shame not to give it some improvement. You might get a flat wooden board and practice scraping on that board for a few days to gain some confidence. It is not rocket science and some scrapes wont hurt the machine.
    I have seen guys use a large flat file with end sharpened on a bench grinder for such a task. I have one scraper that is a flat carbide blade set in a flattened galvanized pipe that I used for a number of years. I would bang with my hand to make C shaped scalps with the long pipe end resting on my shoulder..

    You might call around to close machine shops and ask if anyone would come show you how to scrape for payment. You could pay a guy 10 or 30 bucks an hour and between the two of you have the job done.
    Might run such an add in a local paper, need a guy to show me how to oil scalp a machine flat way surface.

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  31. #40
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    IMO, getting some proper way oil is critical. Don't judge how anything works in terms of stick-slip or friction until it's got the right oil.

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