Surface grinder restoration, please help... - Page 6
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  1. #101
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    I did eventually get all the paint and goop off. Richard i followed your advice regarding tractor paint. The only paint I could source was john deere branded. I tried brush on and spray cans. The cans left a nicer finish that seemed more durable. The main body is green and some components will be yellow as these are the inly colors available. It will look like a tractor i guess when its done. Still lots of clean up. The foot broke off when i was rolling it. It was previously jb welded on. Once its in place ill re do it and paint over. Ill start assembling what i can next weekend while im waiting for the table to come back.
    20190805_182237.jpg

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  3. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard King View Post
    Maybe we should start a new thread in the abrasive section and go into these tips. Many will never see them in here..Buck you are well known...maybe you should start it.
    Richard, who knows were this might go but I started writing down much/many of my grinding thoughts and techniques . Agree there are many old salts here who could do the same, but I am doing it. So far close to 30 pages and with photos or sketches likely 40 pages. Likely double that number down the pike. Who knows a pamphlet or a book might result.
    Buck

  4. #103
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    I picked up my parts from the machine repair shop. Ill post some pics later. I reassembled the column and spindle. I removed all the grease and dirt then coated the ways with way oil prior to assembling. Im pretty sure I have all the parts for my one shot oiler. Once i repaint the table pieces I should be ready to fully assemble. I still need to grab some grease fittings from mcmaster carr.
    20190816_170018.jpg

  5. #104
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    Here are some pics of the ways i got rescraped.
    20190818_191138.jpg
    20190818_191133.jpg
    20190818_191128.jpg

  6. #105
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    I installed the oiler and i have some questions. 2 of the hoses terminate into holes in the housing for different spindles that do not seem to reach the actual spindle. It seems to only reach the putside of the pivot bushing. The other spindle hole goes all the way to the spindle. It is a different style. When i fill the two channels with oil it does not seem to go down. I am wondering if maybe there is a small hole i cant see that serves to lubricate the shafts or maybe the bushings rotated somehow. Is this normal? When i use the oiler these two channels only seem to overflow and make a mess. Am I missing something? When i took it apart this is where the lines were terminated. Im not sure if they were oem or not. Thanks.
    20190818_191103.jpg
    20190818_193509.jpg

  7. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stang Bladeworks View Post
    Here are some pics of the ways i got rescraped.
    Could you post a few close-ups? If you get the light hitting it at the right angle we can better see what was done.

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  9. #107
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    Im just working out of town now but when i get back ill take some better pictures of the ways.

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  11. #108
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    Did you buy some Metering Units that supply small metered drops of oil to the oil holes...Also on the saddle top reservoirs there is suppose to be a roller that is pushed up by a spring and when the table moves the rollers roll the oil out of the reservoir and onto the ways. Myford Grinders have the same sort of design with rollers when I retrofit them with Bijur's metering units, I drill a hole and grind a new oil groove. But if your a low volume user drill holes into the reservoir a and pump oil into them. With a metering unit in them. If you don't use a metering unit the pressure with drain to the hole with the least resistance.

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    Richard, when you have a reservoir with sprung roller like this grinder, do you stone a taper into the leading edge of the way at the reservoirs similar to what you do with a regular oil goove? As in to keep the groove from scraping off the oil if it had a sharp edge? Or does this cause a wedge of oil to form with table recip and give table lift?

    L7

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  15. #110
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    Stan you answered your own question. leave the end of the saddle way sharp and you know why :-)

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  17. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard King View Post
    Did you buy some Metering Units that supply small metered drops of oil to the oil holes...Also on the saddle top reservoirs there is suppose to be a roller that is pushed up by a spring and when the table moves the rollers roll the oil out of the reservoir and onto the ways. Myford Grinders have the same sort of design with rollers when I retrofit them with Bijur's metering units, I drill a hole and grind a new oil groove. But if your a low volume user drill holes into the reservoir a and pump oil into them. With a metering unit in them. If you don't use a metering unit the pressure with drain to the hole with the least resistance.
    I did not get any metering units. Right now all 4 channels get lubrication. It may not be perfectly distributed but they are getting oil. I'm just slightly confused about the two channels that feed into the bushings that house the spindles that seem to go nowhere. All that happens seemingly is that oil just oozes out the top because it is not going anywhere in the hole. It appears that the line just terminates into a flat bottomed hole. I don't see how it serves to lubricate anything at all.

    As far as the rollers go. I have them. I removed them prior to sending the table off to make sure they were not lost or damaged during scraping. They are lubricated via small 90 degree connectors with spring loaded caps. I plan to just continue to use this system. I will order new fittings to replace the missing ones and manually fill each reservoir.

    Thanks for your reply.

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  19. #112
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    Here are some more pics.
    I attempted to install the table but i realized that the screws that hold the lubrication rollers are too short on the flat way. They do not allow the roller to extend above the surface of the way. The v groove way seems fine. I assume that if the rollers are not slightly proud they will just sit there and do nothing. I laid a micarta black on the way to attemp to illustrate this. Any input on this is greatly appreciated. For now I will order longer 4-40 screws. I have verified that all 4 assembleis are identical except for the rollers. They are side specific.
    20190825_200315.jpg
    20190825_200321.jpg
    20190825_200341.jpg

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    I also further investigated the oil routing from the one shot. There are no holes in the bushing where the shaft goes so it doesnt seem like the oil goes anywhere. It seems to have no purpose. Any ideas?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stang Bladeworks View Post
    I also further investigated the oil routing from the one shot. There are no holes in the bushing where the shaft goes so it doesnt seem like the oil goes anywhere. It seems to have no purpose. Any ideas?
    Are you saying that the hole which goes into the bushing does not pass all the way through the bushing with an oil groove on the inside? If that's the case, perhaps the bushing is a sintered bronze permeable bearing. These are made from small bronze particles that are pressed together and heated. This forms a solid structure which has tiny holes or passages or pores, so that oil can move through it, especially when under pressure.

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  23. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by ballen View Post
    Are you saying that the hole which goes into the bushing does not pass all the way through the bushing with an oil groove on the inside? If that's the case, perhaps the bushing is a sintered bronze permeable bearing. These are made from small bronze particles that are pressed together and heated. This forms a solid structure which has tiny holes or passages or pores, so that oil can move through it, especially when under pressure.
    Agree to that and another possibility it may be a drill-on-location part and never got drilled. I guess we need to view a service manual on the machine to be sure.
    Question: if it were drilled where would excess the oil go? Could a grease or oil tube and a grease or oil once a year serve the need?

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  25. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grinder74 View Post
    When grinding thin, long parts, I dress rough, angle part across the chuck and move table fast. Block it in. Make block ins specifically for your blades.

    Sent from my SM-J337V using Tapatalk
    This is a good and accepted method of doing this task. Another method is to set the part straight to long travel and full wheel incremental down feed on the part sides with grinding wet and using long travel and small down feeds with not moving the cross feed until near finish size. yes this would require just the right wheel, perhaps a very open white wheel, perhaps grit of greater size than 46, perhaps needing to use the/a course wheel for roughing and switch to a fine wheel for the surface finish needs. Yes with using a 1/2" wide wheel two or more long travel grinds might be needed to cover the full width of the part, followed with a conventional incremental cross feed pass. Magnetic chucks are mild steel and are
    A decent horse power needed to keep RPM at speed depending on the wheel width as a wider wheel needs more horse power. I think 3/4 HP is the minimum HP for a 6-18. I had a job where the 3/4 HP would not do the work efficiently so the shop owner bought me a 3HP Pope spindle for the the machine and the job went smooth in half the time. That was a Reid manual SG.

    To grind the the top edge the part could be set on a piece of card paper stock to protect the chuck and flat sides blocked in with block-in blocks. This to keep the part from sliding down chuck in the go direction that would likely burn the part. I like having an end of chuck bump rail so the flat side grind of such a part will be solid bumper from sliding . Many grinder hands smack their block in blocks with a soft hammer, or with the but handle of a hammer handle..That stresses to the back bump rail ans its holding screws so I don't hammer but just throw a C clamp at the end of my blocks in blocks for such a job. Magnetic chucks are made of mild steel for best holding power and so care should be use for them.
    Block-in-blocks are just like a precision vise with a C clamp or parallel clamp added..
    Note: when you feel the spring in a light duty forged steel or cast iron C clamp you get likely 350 or more pounds of holding pressure.

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  27. #117
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    Michiganbuck, I never tried plunge grinding thin stock, I will if I get the chance. Changing jobs soon so I dont know if or when I will get the chance again. Thanks for the tip!

    Sent from my SM-T378V using Tapatalk

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  29. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grinder74 View Post
    Michiganbuck, I never tried plunge grinding thin stock, I will if I get the chance. Changing jobs soon so I dont know if or when I will get the chance again. Thanks for the tip!

    Sent from my SM-T378V using Tapatalk
    I stopped calling that method plunge grinding and now call it Incremental Down Grinding (IDG).
    So many guys here on PM balked at me saying plunge grinding.

    Some times/parts I down feed on the right side of the part only (so on the grind side) and just free travel going back (part going to the right (climb side).
    This is to give a cool-down rest for a part that would like to heat up or burn.
    Often I long travel slow and wet doing this. Yes depends on the part and needs an open wheel 46 or courser, perhaps a 36 or 24. I mostly use a 46 wheel H through L for topping parts.

    Wait for it ..I am designing a knife grinding/thins wheel dressing device...

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  31. #119
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    The grinder I run says "plunge" and has the option of feeding on conventional and "spark out" on the climb pass. It will also feed in both passes, but I only use that if I dont have to hold close tolerances.

    Sent from my SM-T378V using Tapatalk

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  33. #120
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    I also am limited in wheels used on our grinders so that's why I mentioned dresser speeds. I use different speeds for each particular material, hardness and finish. Yes, it sucks.

    Sent from my SM-T378V using Tapatalk

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