What is in your bag of tricks to take off the grime on a 80 year old machine? - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Brian you should have been an expert long ago scraping goo off the farm tractors you repair in your real job??? I also used to have a steam cleaner for the real rough projects and then sprayed down the metal with kero and oil afterwards. But for the most part I used Industrial cleaner and HOT water. Basic H industrial soap worked great (I tested several before settling for it) Now I would use what Mud is recommending. Oh for those who don't know I have been rebuilding machine tools and cleaning them since I was an apprentice in the late 1960's. I got the crap jobs back then. Now I clean the household dirty jobs for my boss of 44 years. lol

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  3. #42
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    For all the hand scrubbers out there, impulse buy that turned out to work pretty well. You can make any kind of "brush" pretty easily and the charge is decent. You can probably get by making something similar out of a HF tool like mentioned, but figured id share!


    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Dremel-V...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

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  5. #43
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    Hey Richard, do they make a goo scraping attachment for the Biax? lol I use a steam power washer at work, it will clean and even take paint off if you crank it up. I would be leery using it on a machine tool though as it will blow dirt and water into any gap or crevice it gets close to. Kind of like I would never sandblast a machine unless it was totally apart.

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  7. #44
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    Home Depot Heavy Duty Floor stripper (ZEP) FTW !
    I tried a lot on this machine - kerosene, Totally Awesome and Purple didn't touch it.
    Spray it on, let it sit a few minutes and wipe it off.
    These are the results...
    img_1570.jpg


    kimg0023.jpg

    -Scott

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    Its good to try some different types as it can vary a bit depending the goo composition.
    Where most fails oven cleaner has been a problem solver, but rather strong so i always try less strong methods first.

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  10. #46
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    S100 Motorcycle wheel cleaner.

    Tried so many things to get the burned-on cutting oil and chips off my ancient Index Super 55 mill.



  11. #47
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    No one has mentioned Oil Eater. We like it for wet greasy oily mess. It's environmentally friendly, and easy on paint. Otherwise, Awesome is the first choice for old dry and/or caked on crud..

    For scraping try a Goop Scoop. They seem to be made originally made for scooping ink out of quart and gallon paint cans, have a notch to reach under the rim.

    222.jpg

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    Kerosene is lamp oil / fuel as far as I know, I bought a 10 liter container of that for my restoration project. It isn't that effective without physical scrubbing action, even in an ultrasonic cleaner. I use it because I can hose the machine down and not worry about rust.

    Though in hard spots I have used brake cleaner or cillit bang (kitchen grease remover).

  13. #49
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    Both ironsmith and lumberjack mentioned oven cleaner, it really does the trick. I've used it for years on grimy engines, tractors and anything that was difficult to work with, ie heavy and lots of crevices/ hard to reach areas. It can discolor aluminum so take heed on anything other then cast iron. But it sprays on and i usually wash it off with cheap brake cleaner.

  14. #50
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    Dollar General sell stainless steel pot scrubbers, 2 or 3 for a buck. They look like a nasty ball of razor sharp swarf but they are not sharp and are very soft. They work great for a lot of things. Unlike steel wool and scotchbrite they don't shed abrasive or fray small bits that rust.

    A challenge with many of the powerful cleaners is not getting them in the seams of the machine in cases where you aren't tearing it apart. They'll wick in there and potentially cause hidden corrosion.

  15. #51
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    Simple Green makes a foaming barbecue grill cleaner that is magical. Spray on, let it foam and watch years of crud dissolve and run off.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    Simple green in a spray bottle worked pretty well for me, but the grime wasn't 80 years built up. I used a windex bottle to apply it and the heavier stuff needed some soaking.

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    I use solvents when necessary but I use CLP (gun cleaner, lubricant, protectant) with scotch brite pads and plastic spatulas if I can. It is nice that it helps keep things from rusting during the process.

    Ken

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    I am still finding what works best for me but I did buy one of these sets to have some throw away tools to try. So far the 6 or 8 that I like to use are really good for working the intricate areas of the machine. I still have not figured out how to just have a bath of some kind of cleaner and scrub my parts clean with some kind of brush but I am getting a lot of gunk off the slow and meticulous way. 27 bucks to my door from Bezos

    51qaoum7rbl.jpg

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  20. #55
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    Lye
    Not to strong or it takes of the paint
    Wear gloves and goggels
    Much of the commercial available products are or contain in fact lye
    It lasts forever

    Peter

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin T View Post
    I did buy one of these sets to have some throw away tools to try. So far the 6 or 8 that I like to use are really good for working the intricate areas of the machine.
    I will have to keep that (set of clay modeling tools) in mind. I get tremendous mileage from a simple double-ended 8" scriber, with about a 3/4" right-angle bend on one end. I am forever using it when cleaning stuff.


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