Why not scrape in reverse? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Maybe I am totally reversed from most here, but aside from the mess, I would FAR rather work with the HiSpot blue than with Canode.

    I find that the HiSpot blue thins out better, and gets to finer resolution very well as it thins out naturally. When it is at the "haze of blue" stage, it is very sensitive and shows very small high spots. I think it also shows "bull's eye" spots better than Canode. HiSpot blue also essentially never dries out, so it is always about the same consistency, always spreadable.

    Canode washes up 100x better. That is true.

    But I find that Canode dries out very fast, becoming a sort of "sludge" that is too thick, does not thin well, does not spot as well when it is dried (which takes 3 minutes at this time of year) and is only workable for a fairly short time before needing to be cleaned off and re-applied.

    A chemist relative looked at the MSDS, and suggested thinning with proplylene glycol (the non-poisonous anti-freeze) which I have not tried yet. He says that the glycol should be compatible, and will not dry quickly. I do not know if that will give a good consistency, the grease-type base for HiSpot really behaves well, the glycol may make the Canode too "liquid" and smeary.

    For either one, I do not use a brayer, I use the "inking ball" method, also known as a "dauber". I keep it poked into the end of a piece if heavy steel tube, which keeps the blue off my fingers better, and is very easy to use. It also tends to remove any particles that might get into the spotting compound.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    Maybe I am totally reversed from most here, but aside from the mess, I would FAR rather work with the HiSpot blue than with Canode.

    I find that the HiSpot blue thins out better, and gets to finer resolution very well as it thins out naturally. When it is at the "haze of blue" stage, it is very sensitive and shows very small high spots. I think it also shows "bull's eye" spots better than Canode. HiSpot blue also essentially never dries out, so it is always about the same consistency, always spreadable.

    Canode washes up 100x better. That is true.

    But I find that Canode dries out very fast, becoming a sort of "sludge" that is too thick, does not thin well, does not spot as well when it is dried (which takes 3 minutes at this time of year) and is only workable for a fairly short time before needing to be cleaned off and re-applied.

    A chemist relative looked at the MSDS, and suggested thinning with proplylene glycol (the non-poisonous anti-freeze) which I have not tried yet. He says that the glycol should be compatible, and will not dry quickly. I do not know if that will give a good consistency, the grease-type base for HiSpot really behaves well, the glycol may make the Canode too "liquid" and smeary.

    For either one, I do not use a brayer, I use the "inking ball" method, also known as a "dauber". I keep it poked into the end of a piece if heavy steel tube, which keeps the blue off my fingers better, and is very easy to use. It also tends to remove any particles that might get into the spotting compound.
    I'm sorry but I'm having a hard time visualizing this steel tube method. I know what a dauber is and semi know what you're getting at...so what are you using to daube it with?

    I'm having a hard time getting the spread consistent. Heavy in some spots and more translucent in others. I've just been smearing it with my fingers in a rubber glove and it works okay, kind of a pain though.

    I have not tried the plower angle method yet. I will soon but really I think I just have a crap brayer.

  3. #23
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    Not rocket surgery, it's just a wad of stuff with a handle so you can hold it and not be grabbing a glob of blue. Works like a finger, only better.

    Some use felt, I actually use a piece of rolled-up blue shop towel, the stuff that does not shed fibres. Rolled-up, doubled-over, and poked tightly into a piece of heavy-wall tube. The doubled-over stuff should be a tight fit that needs to be twisted back and forth as you push it in.

    Put down several small blobs of blue, then spread them out with a circular motion of the "dauber" to just about any thickness of blue that you want. It's a judgement call, but you get the idea pretty fast to where you can get what you need.

    The dauber tends to pick up and hold any particles or dust that drops onto the spread blue, but I cover the granite or SE with a piece of plastic when I am doing anything other than actually using it to spot with.

    Here is a really crappy picture (sorry) that I took in the shop before I left.


  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    Not rocket surgery, it's just a wad of stuff with a handle so you can hold it and not be grabbing a glob of blue. Works like a finger, only better.

    Some use felt, I actually use a piece of rolled-up blue shop towel, the stuff that does not shed fibres. Rolled-up, doubled-over, and poked tightly into a piece of heavy-wall tube. The doubled-over stuff should be a tight fit that needs to be twisted back and forth as you push it in.

    Put down several small blobs of blue, then spread them out with a circular motion of the "dauber" to just about any thickness of blue that you want. It's a judgement call, but you get the idea pretty fast to where you can get what you need.

    The dauber tends to pick up and hold any particles or dust that drops onto the spread blue, but I cover the granite or SE with a piece of plastic when I am doing anything other than actually using it to spot with.

    Here is a really crappy picture (sorry) that I took in the shop before I left.

    Got it, thank you.

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    WD40 cleans up the high spot blue very easily, never have trouble with blue hands.
    I also use it for cleaning the surfaces and stoning, hell i even put it im my coffee nowdays.
    I just love the stuff.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by apekop View Post
    WD40 cleans up the high spot blue very easily, never have trouble with blue hands.
    I also use it for cleaning the surfaces and stoning, hell i even put it im my coffee nowdays.
    I just love the stuff.
    There was a article in the paper a couple of years ago about a guy with a sore knee ( arthritis ? ) who reckoned he cured the problem by spraying WD 40 on it ! The makers advised other sufferers not to follow his example.

    Regarding " brayers " we used a short "cylinder" or "tube" of good quality cloth bound together with string.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    What is the local accuracy of scraping ?

  9. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by hanermo View Post
    What is the local accuracy of scraping ?
    It depends on your ZIP code

    What sort of question is that?

    You don't make sense. Failure to compute, The computer says No.

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  11. #29
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    Back to the OP'S question, "why not grind flat and then just scrap in low spot (= Oil retention pockets)? This is is/was commonly done in production.

    My MAHO was built like that in the factory. The ways are ground flat and then flaking for oil retention was scraped in.
    Mark
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails _mg_0539.jpg  
    Last edited by rotarySMP; 05-16-2019 at 10:17 AM.

  12. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by rotarySMP View Post
    Back to the OP'S question, "why not grind flat and then just scrap in low spot (= Oil retention pockets)? This is is/was commonly done in production.

    My MAHO was built like that in the factory. The ways are ground flat and then flaking for oil retention was scraped it.
    Mark
    Maho & Deckle had Aschersleden grinders.They were trusted as gospel.

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  14. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by rotarySMP View Post
    Back to the OP'S question, "why not grind flat and then just scrap in low spot (= Oil retention pockets)? This is is/was commonly done in production.

    My MAHO was built like that in the factory. The ways are ground flat and then flaking for oil retention was scraped in.
    Mark
    Looks like that scraping was done with a " Biax ". A lot of makers went down the slide way grind then break up the surface with a " Biax " method when they realised that two ground surfaces running together was asking for trouble.

    Regards Tyrone.


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