FS: Okuma LK manual lathe
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  1. #1
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    Default FS: Okuma LK manual lathe

    848c2acf-2dff-4b1b-ae17-fabb42e88ef6.jpg28bbe940-6e7b-4c24-b3dc-817e61a7b29e.jpg87912a33-a14b-4b6a-94b5-42a8b095b20a.jpg0cecc684-2a16-43a0-8a0b-4d04198ebe98.jpg


    This is a metric lathe, dials, lead screw, etc. here is my posting I have in the ATL Craigslist.

    I have a 1968 Okuma LK manual lathe for sale. Model 1527 - 5HP. It still has original paint, a coolant system, BNIB Bison 4 jaw chuck (is included in price) and can work out a few accessories for the right deal. I also have the manual and parts lists.

    The lathe is currently set up and running on 220 3 phase with a rotary converter and can be ran before purchase. I do not have a way to load this on your trailer so please plan accordingly. I can however, get the lathe moved to my level concrete driveway and you can load from there. Nearest I can tell, the lathe weighs @ 3500#'s.
    It may be a 1968 model but it runs as smooth as a sewing machine... it is unreal how these old machines run so smooth and will outlast anything new in production these days.

    This is a metric lathe, meaning metric dials, lead screw, etc... it will cut inch threads by leaving the half nuts engaged, no need for change gears or swaps but you do have to leave the half nuts engaged. It has not been an issue for me even with threading close to the chuck. It’s just something you need to be aware of.

    Please let me know if I can answer any questions or you would like to set up a time to inspect the lathe.

    Price is $5900 OBO.

    Okuma LK manual lathe - tools - by owner - sale


    I have over 20 pictures on my computer and can take a video for interested parties.

    Please PM me if you are interested. Thanks

  2. #2
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    Does the lathe have the ability to cut inch threads?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jhearons View Post
    Does the lathe have the ability to cut inch threads?
    It will cut inch threads with the half nuts engaged no problem. No need to swap gears, etc.

    I currently use dial indicators instead of the metric dials with no issue.

    This lathe would be a great candidate for a DRO, which I have thought about doing but most all of my threading work is close to the chuck and inch threads. I’ve been making do but would like a simpler setup is the main reason for selling.

    Thanks for bring that point up. I forgot to put that in the ad. I updated the CL ad as well. Thanks again.

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    Can some of you more knowledgeable than I, give me your opinions on what this machine is worth?

    I’ve had some inquiries and obviously being a metric machine will hurt the value some but, it is a really nice clean lathe capable of doing a fine job. Am I way off base on the price or does the metric dials just plain kill the deal for most?

    If I’m so far off on the price, I would just hold onto it and put a DRO on it and keep on keeping on.

    I’m all ears....you won’t hurt my feelings. I’m honestly looking for some feedback as I’m still relatively new at this. Thank you in advance.

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    The metric only dials doesn’t help, but I think for many the short bed length would be a problem.
    It looks like a great really nice lathe, good luck with the sale.


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    Quote Originally Posted by ripperj View Post
    The metric only dials doesn’t help, but I think for many the short bed length would be a problem.
    It looks like a great really nice lathe, good luck with the sale.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Understood, and I appreciate your feedback. Given I can’t do anything about the metric dials, in your opinion, what do you feel the lathe is worth?

    Like I mentioned, I could install a DRO and remedy the dial issue, but so could the purchaser....thanks again.

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    I don’t really have a good feel for a price, but my gut says about 1/2 of what you are asking.


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    Quote Originally Posted by ripperj View Post
    I don’t really have a good feel for a price, but my gut says about 1/2 of what you are asking.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Thank you for the honest reply. I was hoping for a little more but it is what it is....may have to put that DRO on and call it good? Decisions, decisions....

    The good thing about “asking price” is just that...I would definitely take less, you can always go down(the old saying is)...I think I would keep it before I let it go for less than $3k though. I’m definitely still learning. Thanks again.

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    Why are you selling it, seems like a really well built machine?


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    Quote Originally Posted by ripperj View Post
    Why are you selling it, seems like a really well built machine?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    It is indeed very well built, heavy, super smooth...I have taken a couple classes and know just enough to be a tinkerer. I’ve chambered a couple of BR barrels and practiced on “quite a few”...

    The threading is what has me on edge every time. Having to leave the half nuts engaged in order to thread 1-18 or 1-16 is nerve racking to me and no I don’t play the radio or have people in the shop...before someone asks. It’s just a tense time because I only keep the tenon out of the jaws so I have very little room for error.

    I do cut a thread relief, keep one hand on the cross slide and one on the off switch. When I reach the thread relief, I turn the switch off and crank out the cross slide to keep the tool from hitting the chuck and let coast to a stop.

    By doing that, I thread at a relatively slow speed which works out but feel the threads would finish better at a higher speed??? Maybe, maybe not??

    This also wouldn’t be an issue if I let the barrel stick out farther from the chuck but as I said, I’m very new....

    I run the lathe on a rotary converter with a 10hp motor for the 3 phase. From what I’ve read, I “could” go straight to reverse...the 3 phase would “soak up” the abruptness of going from forward straight to reverse?? Maybe, maybe not??

    Anyway, sorry for the long post. Hope I didn’t bore you, but short answer on why I want to sell is the threading process with engaged half nuts...

    I can’t thank you enough for the questions and critique.

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    I can see where that would be tough on the nerves. Sometimes I try to get a better finish and speed things up, but it’s hard to even engage the half- nut first shot sometimes when the thread dial is spinning like a windmill


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    Quote Originally Posted by ripperj View Post
    I can see where that would be tough on the nerves. Sometimes I try to get a better finish and speed things up, but it’s hard to even engage the half- nut first shot sometimes when the thread dial is spinning like a windmill


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Yeah, my thread dial is not going very fast so I don’t have that issue, and once I lock it the first time, I don’t have to worry about trying to lock it back because I can’t take it out....

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    around here (So Cal) that lathe would probably go for $4-4500.

    I wouldn't worry about the metric dials, new owners could fix that with a decent DRO.

    Inch threading I would want to get change gears, not sure I would like the idea of threading up to a shoulder leaving the halfnuts engaged.

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    Location makes a difference on price also, not sure of the market in your area. Also with some manual machines the price has fallen quite a bit as a higher and higher percentage of machinists these days have never used manual equipment or have a desire to. The last place I worked for the man and that was over 20 years ago had a Hardinge tool room lathe and a Bridgeport mill among a dozen CNC lathes and a dozen machining centers that no one had even turned on for years till I got there. I have a Hardinge HCT that is in better condition than when I bought it 20 years ago that probably isn't worth 1/3 of what I paid for it.

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    Flip your tool upside down and thread away from the chuck

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    Quote Originally Posted by twin staged View Post
    Flip your tool upside down and thread away from the chuck
    What fun is that?

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    Quote Originally Posted by twin staged View Post
    Flip your tool upside down and thread away from the chuck
    I’ve thought of that but, then how do you get lined up to start the next pass all while keeping the half nuts engaged?

    Almost impossible to stop or in my case let it coast back to a starting point?

    Thanks for the ideas though.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by triumph406 View Post
    around here (So Cal) that lathe would probably go for $4-4500.

    I wouldn't worry about the metric dials, new owners could fix that with a decent DRO.

    Inch threading I would want to get change gears, not sure I would like the idea of threading up to a shoulder leaving the halfnuts engaged.

    After talking to Okuma, I was under the impression the one and only extra ear they offered with this machine was a 72 tooth....even with that gear, I couldn’t thread inch threads without keeping the half nuts engaged.....

    Take that for what it’s worth as the gentleman I spoke to at Okuma was probably younger than me and has never even seen a manual Okuma lathe...

    But if the opinion here is different, I can source or have made the 72 tooth gear as I have the parts diagrams, etc for the lathe and know what dimensions it needs to be...Okuma wanted $850 for the gear and when I asked how long it would take to get, I never received an answer

    Thank you for your responses as well...

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    Default FS: Okuma LK manual lathe

    Are there exposed gears under the belt cover on the headstock? You could get change gears made cheaper than getting a new lathe. Without spending a lot of money it will be hard to beat the quality of what you have. Might only take one 127 tooth gear, but you would have to do the math and see what your quick change box would give you.

    Edit- I did t see your previous reply


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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    Location makes a difference on price also, not sure of the market in your area. Also with some manual machines the price has fallen quite a bit as a higher and higher percentage of machinists these days have never used manual equipment or have a desire to. The last place I worked for the man and that was over 20 years ago had a Hardinge tool room lathe and a Bridgeport mill among a dozen CNC lathes and a dozen machining centers that no one had even turned on for years till I got there. I have a Hardinge HCT that is in better condition than when I bought it 20 years ago that probably isn't worth 1/3 of what I paid for it.

    I hear you....the market around here seems pretty slow...not too many people looking for a manual machine these days.
    If they are, they look at those metric dials and flip out and don’t understand what they are even looking at....

    Thank you for your reply.


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