List of home shop machines not allowed on PM classifieds
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  1. #1
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    Arrow List of home shop machines not allowed on PM classifieds

    Note PM is a manufacturing forum, not a home shop forum....therefore, do not advertise the following-

    1. Atlas
    2. Craftsman, Dunlap
    3. Any horizontal shapers (ok in Antique Machinery forum however)
    4. Any Chinese or Taiwanese home shop grade machines
    5. Unimat
    6. Any antique machines or tools (ok in Antique Machinery forum however)
    7. Taig, Sherline

  2. #2
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    You should add sherline to you list.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIP6A View Post
    You should add sherline to you list.
    Right, forgot about that one...thanks...just added it.

  4. #4
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    Nice and clean and unambiguous.

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    Atlas arbor press?

    Chip

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chip Chester View Post
    Atlas arbor press?

    Chip
    I think that's a different Atlas

  8. #7
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    the small 9 and 10 inch South Bends fall into the same category as the home shop grade..
    Along with Myfords..

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by RC99 View Post
    the small 9 and 10 inch South Bends fall into the same category as the home shop grade..
    Along with Myfords..
    We've got two 9" southbends and a 10" that we use in a profesional shop. Alot of them were sold new to professional shops even though they're now in someones garage. I understand the forum guidelines to mean that Home shop machines can't be discussed, but professional grade machines in a home shop enviroment can be discussed. (?)

  10. #9
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    I have an Atlas 12x36 that came out of a professional shop. It's actually a clausing...but the name badge really has nothing to do with it. It is one of the few Atlas branded machines that was used industrially. The Atlas, along with the Logan and small SouthBend lathes were largely intended for small shops, either hobby, or repair based and not for industry.

    His intent, as has been explained, is that there are better places on the 'net to find information for these machines, with the exception of the SB, in which the SB forum here is pretty useful. What this does is cut down on the "what do you think of the RF45 mill drill" threads that were once so common.

    There is no rule against discussing things made on these machines, only the discussion of the machines themselves.

  11. #10
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    A friend of mine had a "heavy duty" Atlas lathe. It was a MUCH more industrial lathe than the usual. V ways,very heavily built compared to the ordinary Atlas. Heavier than a similar size South Bend,IIRC. Suffered from having the same Atlas spindle,though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by M.B. Naegle View Post
    We've got two 9" southbends and a 10" that we use in a profesional shop. Alot of them were sold new to professional shops even though they're now in someones garage. I understand the forum guidelines to mean that Home shop machines can't be discussed, but professional grade machines in a home shop enviroment can be discussed. (?)
    And I see the cheap chinese CQ6230 machines in maintenance shops as well.... They are just as capable as a small south bend...

    I have a small South Bend clone, and to be honest they are on a par with the small chinese ones IMO...

  13. #12
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    Rules are rules but just for the record: South Bend lathes found a home in the machine shop of some of our most decorated war ships, spanning at least three wars. Possibly, even British ships.

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    Since we're talking about professional shops and not schlock houses, and since this is 2011, the list should be limited only to machines made after about 1991 (20 years is a good service life) and only to machines made in the USA. Oh... wait... never mind.

  15. #14
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    I know rules can't be perfect, there is something sort of funny about a rule against "home shop" and "antique" machines that would disallow a 36" Cincinnati shaper but allows a Hammond Trim O Saw.

    Not too many Trim O Saws in manufacturing these days.

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    How large does a Taiwanese lathe have to be before it is no longer home shop grade? Probably most would agree that 8" swing is home shop and 20" isn't, but what's the cut off? Just curious....

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  18. #16
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    Ya know, I've never actually seen a deckel or a schaublin used at any manufacturing
    site, at least in the US.....


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  20. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark thomas View Post
    I know rules can't be perfect, there is something sort of funny about a rule against "home shop" and "antique" machines that would disallow a 36" Cincinnati shaper but allows a Hammond Trim O Saw.

    Not too many Trim O Saws in manufacturing these days.
    If one wants to find inequalities in these rules one will certainly find them, as it's nearly impossible to make them all inclusive for every possibilty. In my mind the huge difference is that hundreds of home shop folks are dying to chatter on about shapers, esp small shapers, whereas it's pretty rare to bring up Hammond saws. But if you want me to add Hammond saws to the list I will.

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  22. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    Ya know, I've never actually seen a deckel or a schaublin used at any manufacturing
    site, at least in the US.....

    Me neither ... till I emigrated.

    First time I saw a 102 I thought it was a toy. I just didn't get it.

    But the Schaublin 102 is obligitory. I have never seen a shop here without at least 1.

    The Deckel fp1 is very common, but apparently optional.

    What's with the no power hacksaws??? (Am I remembering the rules correctly?) I like em.

  23. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    Ya know, I've never actually seen a deckel or a schaublin used at any manufacturing
    site, at least in the US.....

    You haven't been out much then....I've seen plenty of them in manufacturing... the CNC versions of Deckels and Maho anyway. The manual versions, esp the 1980's vintage machines, and esp Schaublins, are rare as hens teeth in any environment in this country.

    In fact, the only manual Deckel I've run across in person at an auction was in a manufacturing envirnoment and ironically the rarest and nicest of them all...the Deckel FP4MK. Also amazing was that is was near me.. in Duncan, SC. I bought it, couldn't sell it here for proper money and eventually sold it to a manufacturing concern in Mexico !

    Oh wait, there was one other manual Deckel, a second generation Deckel FP2 at auction in Sanford, NC of all crazy places...those guys were manufacturing armor plates for military vehicles. The FP2 was a leftoever from another company they bought.

  24. #20
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    Oh. Schaublin 102 = hardinge HLVH. Got it.

    I guess what I was really saying is, it's incredibly rare to find *any* manual machines
    in present-day manufacturing sites. So to be really really fair it would make sense to
    ban any discussion of anything not CNC.

    If you want to make the rule sensible, with the provision that it has to be a present-day
    manufacturing machine. Looking back at the one manufacturing plant I did work at,
    all the lathes were honking big OKUMA cnc units, which ran basically around the clock.
    And, a Hurco bed mill, likewise. The only manual machine in the place was a table saw,
    even the cutoff saw was NC controlled and automatic.

    South bend lathes, Atlas lathes, horizontal shapers - all at one time were used in
    manufacturing. But not any more of course. It's pretty clear that Atlas machines
    are verboten because, well, because you say so. But for a guy trying to find parts
    how much does it hurt for him to put a request up in the antiques section?

    Or, is that a 'camel's nose in the tent' kind of problem?

    BTW those Okuma lathes were amazing. Never saw anything like those till then, or
    since then. Is the manufacturing plant for those in the area affected by the
    nuclear disaster in japan?


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