need used lathe to cut open torque converters
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  1. #1
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    Default need used lathe to cut open torque converters

    Hi Everyone,

    I wonder if any of you guys could help me.
    I need advice on buying a used lathe to cut open torque converters.

    The issue is we need 11" to 12"
    swing over the saddle/carriage.

    Also need to attach a 4" air cylinder mounted on end of lathe to hold converter to face plate, you can see videos on youtube, here is one https://youtu.be/vk3n_ss0x5s

    A turret is one option.

    Also need short lathe/ min length

    And heavy duty!

    Any ideas are appreciated,

    Jay transcraft albany, ga

    229-889-9914

  2. #2
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    A bit far off, but a start, and you can go run it. Take a TC and see if the lathe is big enough to suit you

    Midland Lathe Metal working - business/commercial - by owner - sale

    I'll bet you are mechanical enough to add you own cylinder if wanted. Sure not going to come with one

    Offer considerably less - see what happens. Also educate yourself on moving 5000 lb pieces of iron

    You will need three phase juice at your place for it, but that isn't a big deal

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    Just for the sake of clarity, will you be working on parts that are roughly 12” in diameter, or 24” in diameter?

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    12" to 13" dia

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Moore View Post
    to cut open torque converters.

    The issue is we need 11" to 12"
    swing

    A turret is one option.

    Also need short lathe/ min length

    And heavy duty!
    Sounds as if what you really need is an inexpensive old horizontal mill rather than a lathe. The "tee" lathe concept. There are several examples on PM - a John Oder contribution among those.

    Less space and money required, lower mass to transport, and you just fixture and even semi-automate it to do what you need to do the the converters, not much else, so "throughput" speed can be made to be good as well.

    Another option might be a converted "brake lathe", as-in a Van Norman sized for trucking tribe drum brakes. Those need VERY little floor-space.

    20CW.. Inflation, etc.

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  9. #6
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    I use a Gisholt #5 ram turret lathe to cut open torque converters. You need a heavy machine when cutting a 13" diameter weld.

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    It's funny, I saw this subject on the main index and the only part visible was "need used lathe to cut open..." And my first thought was torque converters.

    Last year I was at an auction where a guy bought a Leblond for $600, specifically for that purpose. I think it was around a 16" or 18" swing, and had an L1 spindle. It was a good lathe, with no signs of abuse or excessive bed wear. Just a bit filthy from being used in a large fab shop. Under the grime it ran smooth and quiet. He got a great deal.

    I needed the L1 chucks and ended up buying them. I apologized to him for it. Nice guy - he declined to accept money for the second set of jaws for the 12" Buck 6 jaw chuck, which were in with the lathe stuff.

    You didn't mention how far you are willing to go, and your ability to haul, but you should be able to find a similar deal. You don't need much rpm for those large diameters, and those lathes tend to sell cheap. If you will never have any other use for the lathe, bed wear is not critical.

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    thermite posted on a tee lathe, cant find example

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    tee lathe?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Moore View Post
    thermite posted on a tee lathe, cant find example
    It may take a while! The concept is common. The actual machines were rare, though they are still being made, brand-new. All about diameter, near-zero bed length, so they actually resemble a horizontal mill - just usually have stouter spindles.

    FWIW-not-much, I'd be wanting to marry a cold-saw in as "live tooling" rather than single-point the weld off. Overall machine could be much lighter. Maybe even just a powered rotary table. Cheaper than either a mill or a lathe?

    Which - Hacker's Second Law as it is, means SOMEBODY already makes bespoke equipment for opening up torque converters.

    Who might they be, and what part of their solution needs to be improved, rather than just adopted?

    20CW
    Last edited by thermite; 11-06-2018 at 01:57 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Moore View Post
    tee lathe?
    eBay - Page Not Found

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    A smaller, cheaper "tee lathe" - only swings 40"

    (actually, a horizontal milling machine with a few shop built enabling doo dads)

    (may have to scroll up to Post #1)

    Horizontal Mill As Lathe

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Behner View Post
    Not a good idea.

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    An old 24 inch Bullard VTL is something to consider as well. Sold mine many years ago!
    JB

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    Hey guys Thanks for your replies!

    My name is Jay Moore w/ Transmission Crafters

    You must be a very knowledgeable group of tooling professionals.
    (a little butter always helps)

    I need help improving our cut-open equipment.

    If you have time, may I ask you,

    how would you setup a horizontal mill to cut open torque converters?

    mill size,
    model #,
    toolpost ?, centering, height

    how to mount push-cylinder need 12" + travel to load part

    chip collection,

    ease of loading pice
    a converter is 13" dia, 65lbs, w (8) 3/8" x 3/4" long studs to load into face plate
    (a heavy lift and awkward)

    Hope to hear from you,

    Jay Moore
    transcraft
    229-889-9914

    ps: could the power lift assist loading converter/ might wear-out too quick ?

    tks again

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    I didn't see the swing OCS

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    The proper term for the Tee Lathe is Facing lathe. Here are some examples: Used Facing Lathe Machine for Sale | CNC Facing Lathes

    The lathe in the video looked like a J&L no 5 turret lathe. A no. 5 or 1A Warner &Swasey would also do the job nicely. Turret lathes are pretty cheap now days.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Illinoyance View Post
    The proper term for the Tee Lathe is Facing lathe. Here are some examples: Used Facing Lathe Machine for Sale | CNC Facing Lathes

    The lathe in the video looked like a J&L no 5 turret lathe. A no. 5 or 1A Warner &Swasey would also do the job nicely. Turret lathes are pretty cheap now days.
    "Facing lathe" has to do with your body orientation. It is bad form and dangerous to operate one when NOT "facing lathe", as-in with your tender ass exposed to it, scratching sweaty C.O. Jones on the longitudinal traverse handwheel crank.

    IOW "lighten up". Most of us over the tender age of fifty know what is meant by "Tee Lathe".

    Youse youngsters are all over in the other bay running CNC and going scared 3-D printing will take your job anyway.



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