Wanted: Smallish Horizontal Milling Machine - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Degull View Post
    I am going to be notching bicycle tubes with it. The mill is going to be dedicated to one function for now. I have seen others get away with using the smaller bench top models.
    I'll take your advise and try to find something more in the general purpose mill category like a Nichols or the Sheldon. Most importantly I need a mill that will take up as little floor space as possible and not cost a million bucks. I would prefer to find a small mill that uses 40 taper since I own 40 tooling already. The Nichols mill would be ideal but I haven't come across a tool room model with all the handles.
    If all you need is a tubing notcher, they exist, are readily available, wont require a shit ton of searching, and will take much less space than a giant bench paper weight. Pretty easily to build yourself also.


    The Nichols tool room millers are really cool machines, but as you mention, they're rare in the "turn key" configuration, and it looks like you're making a pretty big leap (no disrespect intended), to justify a machine you want, with highly unrealistic constraints. I deal with people all the time justifying new trash import "bench" mills because they are certain they need a mill, know jackshit about one, think it's going to save them space (it wont, same basic envelope as a bridgeport), and want the comforting illusory "peace of mind" of not doing the research but trusting that a new machine with a warranty will give them some security if the machine turns out (is inevitably) a piece of shit.


    Even the toolroom Nichols, is a pretty specialized piece of kit, rare, and not a plug and play solution, that said, a no 2 K&T horizontal takes barely any more room, tucked in a corner. It may seem like it does on paper, but in reality, it does not. If you don't have a corner available, or the will to install a small real mill, just buy a notcher.


    How many micro horizontals are there with 40 tapers? (BTW are you saying you have nmtb 40 taper tooling? Because I don't think there are any CAT-40 micro horizontals are there?)


    EDIT: I see you got a nichols, enjoy it, but if you only using it for notching, you're doing a disservice to it's legacy IMO. Here's hoping you use it for real work. They're really interesting machines.

  2. #22
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    Hi I have a industro light horizontal milling machine I would like to sell I believe it is an M500 it's in good to moderate working condition and I have no attachments for it. I have no idea what is worth maybe someone on this site could help us out but I'd let it go in a fair price to a good home. I'm out in Washington State contact me at [email protected]

  3. #23
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    Thanks for the offer but I ended up buying a Nichols Miller.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Degull View Post
    Thanks for the offer but I ended up buying a Nichols Miller.
    when you get it set-up, please post some pix of the set up and operation.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by javan.dempsey View Post
    If all you need is a tubing notcher, they exist, are readily available, wont require a shit ton of searching, and will take much less space than a giant bench paper weight.
    People who make high quality bicycle and motorcycle frames want the tubes to fit together really really nicely. Tubing notchers won't cut the mustard.

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  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by javan.dempsey View Post
    EDIT: I see you got a nichols, enjoy it, but if you only using it for notching, you're doing a disservice to it's legacy IMO. Here's hoping you use it for real work. They're really interesting machines.
    The last frame I made, was for my velodrome racer, and it was fitted at the head tube, seat tube, and bottom bracket using investment cast lugs, fork crown and dropouts. At that time, I did NOT have a proper machine tool to cut the notching, so I spent hours with a sanding drum getting it fitted up properly.

    That was back when cro-moly steel was really the ONLY option.

    While I still have my steel framed dogs hanging in the basement, my current steed is carbon-fiber, but if I were to build anything today, it'd be either TIG'd aluminum or titanium. While my welding skills are really good, I would not consider for one moment, the use of a common tubing-notcher for making delicate and precise cuts. To get correct alignment AND a proper strength fillet, the fitment needs to be on-axis, dead-on accurate, and incredible finish quality. There's a Bridgeport 2J in Lake City, Minnesota I'm called to every so often, when my old college roommate needs stainless railings made for his marina customers. Boat bowrails are much more forgiving than bicycles... but I certainly wouldn't attempt THEM with a tubing notcher, either.

    A small mill does have the disadvantage that it occupies the same effective footprint as a small full-sized machine... my Nichols sits on a stand that has a tooling cabinet beneath, so the tooling station is integral, and I could actually roll it in and out of a storage pocket if neccessary... but the biggest problem of EITHER, is that the workpiece is going to hang out in the room SOMEWHERE. If I were to attempt a fishmouth on say... a 12ft section of bowrail, I'd have to have the full-sized horizontal in an operating position where that full span is open. IF a shop layout is such that there's other machines in line with the working plane of such an operation (and the shop isn't in a concurrent-operation workflow), one could use the table of an adjacent mill or drilling station, as a support for a longer part. In TYPICAL bicycle frames (i.e. not a tandem, or a recumbent), the longest tube is usually under 40", so it isn't a problem, but in the aforementioned bowrail, being able to roll the Nichols into a clear position for making those cuts is a definite advantage.

    And of course, one other circumstance, is that the OP might be doing his framebuilding in a basement, where being able to call a strong pal to help carry the largest pieces down for reassembly, would make it much more possible than with say... a Cinci #2.

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Degull View Post
    Thanks for the offer but I ended up buying a Nichols Miller.
    Although you found something, if it doesn’t work out I saw this listed again. The guy has posted it for several years Horizontal Mill - tools - by owner - sale


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