WTB: ~15 x 60 Lathe, <4,000#, Asian OK, pref. 2"+ bore, w/in ~400 mi Asheville, NC
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    Default WTB: ~15 x 60 Lathe, <4,000#, Asian OK, pref. 2"+ bore, w/in ~400 mi Asheville, NC

    I need to step up from a 10 x 36 lathe and I've had several projects requiring 4'+ between centers, so I am unlikely to buy anything shorter than 60" between centers (but maybe with a 3"+ bore?). I would like to be able to move it with my own truck, so I would prefer to find a lathe under 3,500#, but I would consider removing a few parts and making two trips, if necessary. This weight restriction probably limits me to a 14"-15" swing. My use will be sporadic. I could live with some wear, but I don't want a major renovation project (I've done that too many times ). I don't currently have 3 phase power, but I'll get a phase converter, if necessary. I hope to find something in the $1,000-3,000 range, depending on tooling, accessories, etc. I think something like a Nardini or Sharpe 15 x 60 would meet my needs well. I hope not to drive too far from Asheville, NC, but, if the lathe and the price are right, I'll drive.
    Last edited by 4kinetic; 03-17-2019 at 06:52 PM.

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    There have been a few in the area lately that would have met your needs. Slim pickings on CL right this sec, but I've been watching for months, looking for something heavier, before I made a deal with someone here for one.

    I'll keep my eyes peeled, and let me know if you need any help moving, I've got a 16' twin axle trailer, and I know a guy with a roll-back that's usually pretty reasonable, has helped me move some larger stuff.

    You'll probably have better luck looking for a nice older American one than a newer Asian one though, that size class appeals to most of the wanna-be garage gunsmiths, and hobbyists usually too afraid of the older ones, and the guys selling the smaller ones seem to all think they're worth 5 times what's reasonable. Seen quite a few Leblonds in the surrounding areas hit the market lately though, toward the upper end of your range.

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    The weight requirement is restrictive. I have an import 16x40, D1-6, 2.06" bore, with a shipping weight of 4,400 lbs. A 16x60 is only going to be heavier. Summit's Euro (rather than Asian) import with a 3" bore weighs in at about 6,200 lbs, shipping.

    14x60 imports seem to be a bit thin on the ground at the moment, especially if you require a 2+" bore. The Leblond RKL-1360G 14x60 is about 3,600 lbs net. The current Southbend (actually unmentionable Green namebadge company) SB1055F 16x60 is spec'd at 3,300 lbs net. Call it personal taste, but I'd expect machines of that size to weigh at least 1/2 to 3/4 ton more than that. And "heavy" machines of that size, close to twice that much.

    Regarding old iron, unfortunately a lot of old iron has much smaller spindle bores than the current crop. I saw a Lodge&Shipley locally (either 14 or 16 inch swing) with only 1.5" bore.

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    Quote Originally Posted by javan.dempsey View Post
    let me know if you need any help moving
    Thanks! I would really like to stick to a weight that I can move myself, just to give myself flexibility/convenience in the future.

    Quote Originally Posted by javan.dempsey View Post
    You'll probably have better luck looking for a nice older American one than a newer Asian one though, that size class appeals to most of the wanna-be garage gunsmiths, and hobbyists usually too afraid of the older ones, and the guys selling the smaller ones seem to all think they're worth 5 times what's reasonable. Seen quite a few Leblonds in the surrounding areas hit the market lately though, toward the upper end of your range.
    I understand that there are some sacrifices with many of the Asian lathes. I am assuming that the greatest sacrifices are in the smaller sizes. 15" x 60" would not be a common hobbyist size. I have also been looking into South Bend lathes (E/8' bed), which would definitely fall within my weight requirements, and LeBlond lathes. The spindle bores on those are generally 1.5" or less, so that makes them a little less appealing. I know that parts availability for South Bends would be a big advantage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sfriedberg View Post
    The weight requirement is restrictive.
    I agree. I've been looking for a few months. I have found specs. for a few lathes that meet my requirements, but I understand that patience may be required (and swing will be limited to get the length I want). I may have to be flexible about bore size, but, it is somewhat of a toss-up between sacrificing bore size and bed length.
    I also understand that, for many (most?) people here, opting for a lighter lathe would always be a poor trade-off, but for my purposes, a ~3,000# lathe will be very adequate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4kinetic View Post
    Thanks! I would really like to stick to a weight that I can move myself, just to give myself flexibility/convenience in the future.



    I understand that there are some sacrifices with many of the Asian lathes. I am assuming that the greatest sacrifices are in the smaller sizes. 15" x 60" would not be a common hobbyist size. I have also been looking into South Bend lathes (E/8' bed), which would definitely fall within my weight requirements, and LeBlond lathes. The spindle bores on those are generally 1.5" or less, so that makes them a little less appealing. I know that parts availability for South Bends would be a big advantage.

    Where is this weight limit coming from, out of curiosity? It's not like you're gonna fit a lathe this size in the back of any pickup, and pretty much any 1/2 ton truck or larger will tow 6k+?

    Not certain the specifics but any 60" between centers lathe has gotta be over 8' OAL of a long bed pickup, and you'd be pushing the payload capacity of any pickup bed regardless.

    You have a small single axle trailer or something?

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    Quote Originally Posted by javan.dempsey View Post
    Where is this weight limit coming from, out of curiosity?
    I have a light-duty flatbed truck with a bed-mounted crane. The bed is 11'. The crane's maximum capacity is 4,000#. The maximum payload for the truck is around 3,500#, but I could probably push it a little, if I must. The maximum towing weight is 5,000#. For 99% of my work, this truck is well-suited; for moving a big lathe, it's not.

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    Couple nice machines in Michigan
    qt [I hope to find something in the $1,000-3,000 range,]
    over your weight and budget but look good

    Standard Modern
    Standard Modern 19/80 Lathe - tools - by owner - sale
    Harrison
    Harrison M500 21x80 Lathe - heavy equipment - by owner - sale

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    Let me ask if you plan to move it just once (or once a decade), or if you plan to move it a couple of times a year (like to job locations).

    If your intent is to pick it up and move it just once, consider a LTL shipment to a local rigger and paying the riggers to bring it out to your location from the freight depot. It's an expense, but it frees you up to buy exactly the machine you want, rather than living with a compromise for years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sfriedberg View Post
    If your intent is to pick it up and move it just once, consider a LTL shipment to a local rigger and paying the riggers to bring it out to your location from the freight depot. It's an expense, but it frees you up to buy exactly the machine you want, rather than living with a compromise for years.
    Thanks for your thoughts on my situation. Since my primary work is fabrication, and my use of the lathe is occasional, for specific projects, I will be content with a lathe that a full-time machinist might consider too light, or otherwise inadequate. For me, the debate has been between contracting out my larger turning jobs, and buying a relatively low-priced lathe that will handle 5' lengths. I will be stepping up from a 12 x 36 At las, so I think ANY 15 x 60 lathe will seem rigid and powerful to me. I have turned pieces up to 2.5" x 48" on my current lathe, but it is not good for my hourly rate. Sometimes I need to re-arrange my workshop for large projects, so being able to use my truck crane to move the lathe would be convenient (I know rollers are an option too). If I spend $1,000 to move a lathe, that's $1,000 that could have gone into a better lathe, or tooling.

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    Tough to find a 3" spindle bore for under $3K $4700 this one. with steady and taper attachment.
    seems he should have a 4jaw but not listed.
    Engine lathe - tools - by owner - sale

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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    Tough to find a 3" spindle bore for under $3K
    True! (And thanks for sharing the links.) When I expressed interest in a 3" bore in my original post, I didn't mean that was a requirement; I meant that I could sacrifice some of my desired 60" length if the bore were larger than 2". All three of the lathes you have shared links for are interesting, and of the vintage that I may be able to afford, but I'm pretty sure they are all heavier than my target weight. The only 3" bore lathe I have seen that comes close to my weight target is a SB Turn-Nado 17 x 54, which, I think, weighs 4,300#.

    In my original post I said "I am unlikely to buy anything shorter than 60". I should have also said that I don't expect to find any lathe LONGER than 60" that will meet my weight requirement.

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    If crane capacity is the limiting factor, you can remove tailstock and carriage, motor, and maybe even headstock to get it all more manageable.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dalmatiangirl61 View Post
    If crane capacity is the limiting factor, you can remove tailstock and carriage, motor, and maybe even headstock to get it all more manageable.
    The truck payload capacity is similar to the crane, but, as I mentioned in the initial post, I could make two trips, if I must.

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    I'm still looking. (My current lathe will handle my needs in the near future.)

    My target has shifted a little. A ~15 x ~40 lathe with a D1-8 spindle, such as the Sharp 1640L, would allow me to turn 40"+ long pieces, while taking minimal floor space. At 3,600#, it would be close to my truck capacity.

    Lathes with ~40"-50" between centers and D1-8 spindles seem to be rare. I know of the Sharp 1640L and the Jet GH-1440-ZX, but they are probably out of my price range since they are current models. The only older small D1-8 lathe I know of is the SBL Turn-Nado 17 x 54. Are there any other small D1-8 lathes from the past ~40 years I should be watching for?

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    Many of the 16x40 and smaller lathes I saw while looking had D1-6 (including the one I bought. )They will barely fit 40” work piece, but the carriage had around 35” travel, so a true 40” piece requires creative use of the topslide.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

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    You are more likely to find spindles with D1-6 noses and 2.06" bores in a modern 16" swing lathe. Not saying D1-8's don't exist in that size category, just that they run second place in numbers. 12 years ago, when I was shopping, 16x40 was a well-populated category. At the moment, that combination of swing and center distances seems kind of uncommon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4kinetic View Post
    I have a light-duty flatbed truck with a bed-mounted crane. The bed is 11'. The crane's maximum capacity is 4,000#. The maximum payload for the truck is around 3,500#, but I could probably push it a little, if I must. The maximum towing weight is 5,000#. For 99% of my work, this truck is well-suited; for moving a big lathe, it's not.
    Moving the lathe is a one shot event, living with it is an everyday event. Be willing to pay a rollback for the right lathe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4kinetic View Post
    I'm still looking. (My current lathe will handle my needs in the near future.)

    My target has shifted a little. A ~15 x ~40 lathe with a D1-8 spindle, such as the Sharp 1640L, would allow me to turn 40"+ long pieces, while taking minimal floor space. At 3,600#, it would be close to my truck capacity.

    Lathes with ~40"-50" between centers and D1-8 spindles seem to be rare. I know of the Sharp 1640L and the Jet GH-1440-ZX, but they are probably out of my price range since they are current models. The only older small D1-8 lathe I know of is the SBL Turn-Nado 17 x 54. Are there any other small D1-8 lathes from the past ~40 years I should be watching for?
    I'd say keep saving and expect to up your price target a bit. Those lathes seem to be either uncommon, or in demand. I've actually seen a number of them in shops, but rarely seen them pop up for sale, the Sharp that is.


    I'd also agree, with another poster, that just using a rollback to move the lathe is the smart move. I may even know a guy that's reasonable and capable if you end up needing such.

    I don't have a crane, forklift, or anything other than a trailer, pinch/digging bars, and round bar or rollers, but I've got a number of machines in the 6-8k lb range, and have made a couple of moves around the area. Even if I had the ability to pick those machines up, I'd *still* use my rollback guy to move the bigger stuff. Every time I've done it myself, it's been more stressful, and time consuming, than it's worth. Rollback literally just backs up, rigs a sling, or two, maybe a slide plate, winch, and yanks it up the ramp. Straps it down, takes it where I want it, and slides it back off.

    Honestly, in this case, a beefier lathe, is actually easier, and safer to move, since most of them have more mass in the base, a lower center of gravity, and much less likely to tip over. I'm of the opinion that any "bench" type lathes that are on sheet metal stands, are the most dangerous machines to move, large vertical bandsaws being the second worst, but the lathes are deceptive, because they can be quite top heavy, but don't look it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by javan.dempsey View Post
    I'm of the opinion that any "bench" type lathes that are on sheet metal stands, are the most dangerous machines to move
    True. They often have rather narrow footprints too.

    If I need a rollback, I'll check back with you.

    I'm likely to end up with a lathe with a D1-6 spindle . . . but I'll hold out for a while. I'm resisting the inevitable price-creep that occurs with every tool / machine purchase.


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