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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    This one I saw is 11 hp instead of 20 hp like the SK26, price looks good on it. Have to factor in shipping costs.
    Procyon Machine
    Have you looked into this one I linked to yet? Seems like the perfect size for you.

    It WILL be gone shortly, if not already:
    Who would you have do an online auction of your place if you retired or whatever ?

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    [/B]
    Probably not worth shipping to East Coast, but I've considered running a PAIR of those, one alone nearly always, maybe rotated to even-out wear, and both, manifolded-up only rather seldom. Might not do for YOUR needs, surely would for mine vs the rude C-H I have now..

    So.. capacity limitations aside, how well has it served you, otherwise, and would you do it again, larger for the reliability, "relatively" low noise, & such?

    TIA

    Bill


    I like the compressor. Definitely quietest compressor I've ever owned. Since it was priced well and is so quiet, I think I'd do it again, but maybe a larger model.

    Definitely lacking in duty cycle and volume.
    I've been thinking of making the following modifications:
    -removing the plastic heat guards, which actually cause some of the noise that it does produce.
    -adding an adjustable speed large computer fan blowing across the pump to let it run longer/increase duty cycle.

    Otherwise, I'd say it's a good compressor.

  4. #23
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    Don't forget to look at "rotary non screw" compressors.

    They come in the smaller variety like what you are looking for.

    mattei and hydrovane come to mind

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  6. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpseguin View Post
    Otherwise, I'd say it's a good compressor.
    Thanks for that. My use of blast media is limited to cleaning out the odd contorted zone or inside corner, medium nozzle, a few bursts. Nasty enough I try to avoid it, use other methods, slow is OK.

    Otherwise the tiny "air brush" style for infrequent detailing.

    So I don't NEED a lot of air but to run one air hand-tool at a go, now and then, nor even miss a compressor AT ALL many a week.

    Sounds like a fit for my use.

  7. #25
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    For light or intermittent use, a screw compressor will almost certainly make your power bill go up. The cycle on a screw is

    Run until the oil is warm unloaded
    Run until you reach pressure
    Run another minute or two after you reach pressure unloaded
    Think about turning off, nah JK keep running.

    They're great, they're quiet, they beat the pants off a recip for life. But a garage is the wrong place.

    I'm in the same boat looking for a quieter garage compressor in the 3-5hp range. The Eastwood can't freeze and the QC is suspect by all reports, so that's out. I don't want to drop the kind of money an oil-free scroll would cost. The many-head California air tools style are expensive for what one is getting, and the 5cfm ones are too small.

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  9. #26
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    I was guided away from rotary screw after speaking with Kaeser, they need to be run often to make it worthwhile.

    I bought a larger (they are all on the small side) Jun-Air with cabinet and have had no regrets.

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  11. #27
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    In a garage, if you need quiet, take a big recip, like 15 to 20 HP sized and reduce it down to run at minimum RPM. Usually 350-400. Needs 5-7HP to run there depending on PSI setting.

    They are super quiet, like hear the valves clicking at 400 RPM.

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  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    In a garage, if you need quiet, take a big recip, like 15 to 20 HP sized and reduce it down to run at minimum RPM. Usually 350-400. Needs 5-7HP to run there depending on PSI setting.

    They are super quiet, like hear the valves clicking at 400 RPM.
    I've been trying to AVOID that sort of side-trip for a surplus of projects already, but buying a NEW tank and a good-old 'presser may make too much sense to not give it a "hearing". Or lack-of.

    Most especially with a few RPM III Dee Cee motors & KB-Penta DC Drives sitting spare. One Lovejoy coupling. The "usual suspects" as to plumbing, but no unloaders needed, and no pulleys or belts, either?

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    I've been trying to AVOID that sort of side-trip for a surplus of projects already, but buying a NEW tank and a good-old 'presser may make too much sense to not give it a "hearing". Or lack-of.

    Most especially with a few RPM III Dee Cee motors & KB-Penta DC Drives sitting spare. One Lovejoy coupling. The "usual suspects" as to plumbing, but no unloaders needed, and no pulleys or belts, either?
    It's not a big project. You buy a big, working compressor on the cheap side (common). You make your mind up on a motor- You can keep what it has, buy a new single phase, or put a smaller 3 phase on there. 3 phase choices using a VFD. You order the proper size sheave to match your motor and get the speed you desire.

    A new Baldor single phase 5HP compressor duty motor was like $360 on the shelf at my local electric motor dealer.

    The single phase route is real easy. I did the 3 phase route with VFD and that was a lot more work and expense for no real gain. Guess it's kinda cool that it spins up slow, but who gives a shit when it maxes out at 400 and industrial compressors almost all have oil unloaders so there isn't any starting load.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    It's not a big project. You buy a big, working compressor on the cheap side (common). You make your mind up on a motor- You can keep what it has, buy a new single phase, or put a smaller 3 phase on there. 3 phase choices using a VFD. You order the proper size sheave to match your motor and get the speed you desire.

    A new Baldor single phase 5HP compressor duty motor was like $360 on the shelf at my local electric motor dealer.


    The single phase route is real easy. I did the 3 phase route with VFD and that was a lot more work and expense for no real gain. Guess it's kinda cool that it spins up slow, but who gives a shit when it maxes out at 400 and industrial compressors almost all have oil unloaders so there isn't any starting load.
    So, as it turns out, my friend has an old (April 1962 if I read the date code correctly) Ingersoll Rand 342x3 two stage compressor with a nice noise suppression enclosure he’s going to sell to me.
    It has a 3ph, 3 Hewlett-Packard dual voltage motor on it.
    I was thinking of upgrading it with a VFD so I can run from single phase without having to run my rotary phase converter.
    Can you please elaborate on the “more work” part (I get the more expensive part)?
    Ie, how’d you wire it?
    [How] did you integrate the pressure switch?
    Which VFD did you use?
    ...

    Thanks!

  17. #31
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    Cant you get a single phase motor for the same or less money?

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    As for the air dryer, I think I can find a used one locally.
    I was thinking about making my own with a refrigerator, but it seems like a waste of time, money and effort if I can find a good used one for a reasonable amount.

    I already have a 60 gallon tank.
    I’m going to start thinking of plumbing.
    I know I’ll catch real flack for this, but I was thinking I would use 3/4” PVC (480PSI) and then have drops to near my machines with manifolds.

  19. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpseguin View Post
    I’m going to start thinking of plumbing.
    I know I’ll catch real flack for this, but I was thinking I would use 3/4” PVC (480PSI) and then have drops to near my machines with manifolds.
    Did you read the air line thread recently posted?
    Stay away from the PVC.

  20. #34
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    Default WTB: Rotary Screw Air Compressor

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Did you read the air line thread recently posted?
    Stay away from the PVC.
    Not yet, but I will now!
    Thanks!

    Got a link? Searching isn’t turning up any results.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpseguin View Post
    Not yet, but I will now!
    Thanks!

    Got a link? Searching isn’t turning up any results.
    There's probably a million threads on every forum on the Internet about the use of PVC airlines. The common thought is that they work great if you like to get stabbed in the eyes with plastic shrapnel.

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  23. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpseguin View Post
    Not yet, but I will now!
    Thanks!

    Got a link? Searching isn’t turning up any results.

    Here is the one I was thinking of:
    Air line question

    I personally knew a guy (best friends brother in law) who ran a PVC line in his cnc shop. He thought it was the greatest thing when he put it all in. after several blowouts and repairs in the header at the ceiling it was replaced with metal lines.

    I would either use copper or threaded steel, copper is easier to instal if you dont have pipe threading tools & wrenches.

    Here is one on copper lines:
    Copper air lines- 50/50 or 95/5 solder?

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  25. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Here is the one I was thinking of:
    Air line question

    I personally knew a guy (best friends brother in law) who ran a PVC line in his cnc shop. He thought it was the greatest thing when he put it all in. after several blowouts and repairs in the header at the ceiling it was replaced with metal lines.

    I would either use copper or threaded steel, copper is easier to instal if you dont have pipe threading tools & wrenches.

    Here is one on copper lines:
    Copper air lines- 50/50 or 95/5 solder?
    W/R Copper, one should Sil-Flo braze it, HVAC-style rather than soft-solder it.
    See also "Shark bite" & similar couplings They are rated for what? 300 PSIG? More?

    And pay attention to WHICH "copper" tubing and its fittings!
    Type "M" I'd avoid.
    See Type "L" for average pressures with reserve.
    I like the heavier-yet type "K".

    Iron / steel pipe will be way cheaper, given the per-ton price of Copper.

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  27. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    W/R Copper, one should Sil-Flo braze it, HVAC-style rather than soft-solder it.
    See also "Shark bite" & similar couplings They are rated for what? 300 PSIG? More?

    And pay attention to WHICH "copper" tubing and its fittings!
    Type "M" I'd avoid.
    See Type "L" for average pressures with reserve.
    I like the heavier-yet type "K".

    Iron / steel pipe will be way cheaper, given the per-ton price of Copper.
    Yes, Type L or K, avoid M, it is the thinnest.I think some of the sharkbite type fittings are removeable/reuseable. Never used them though.

  28. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by isaac338 View Post
    There's probably a million threads on every forum on the Internet about the use of PVC airlines. The common thought is that they work great if you like to get stabbed in the eyes with plastic shrapnel.
    Yes, but unfortunately Practical Machinist’s search mechanism leaves a lot to be desired and using Tapatalk on top of it makes it that much worse... :-)
    I was snuggling with my sick toddler, so I couldn’t get on a computer.


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