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Thread: Boeing 737 Max

  1. #1001
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    I see you Brits just got your first Poseidon ASW plane. Clearly it is a 737 Max with the appropriate modifications. I wonder if it has MCAS?

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    A union for 28,000 American Airlines cabin crew has told Boeing'''s CEO its members are scared of getting back on the 737 Max

    A union for 28,000 American Airlines cabin crew has told Boeing's CEO its members are scared of getting back on the 737 Max

    It said the union wanted to make its own assessment even after the US Federal Aviation Administration certified the plane to fly again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    I see you Brits just got your first Poseidon ASW plane. Clearly it is a 737 Max with the appropriate modifications. I wonder if it has MCAS?
    P-8A is derived from 737NG. Uses CFM-56 engines.

    No MCAS.

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    Quote Originally Posted by triumph406 View Post
    ...It said the union wanted to make its own assessment even after the US Federal Aviation Administration certified the plane to fly again.
    Because who better to make engineering safety assessments than the flight attendant's union?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jancollc View Post
    Because who better to make engineering safety assessments than the flight attendant's union?
    Yeah I can just see it. Flight attendants suggest a design change that makes the plane nose-dive uncontrollably into the ground.

    Boeing: "HEY. You can't do that. That's OUR job!"

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    Possibly a little late....and return the plane to service first then roll out the enhanced training.
    Errrrr....
    Boeing to invest $1 billion in global safety drive - sources

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    Regulators find gaps in Boeing'''s 737 MAX software documentation: sources

    One person briefed on the matter said Boeing's paperwork was incomplete and substandard and meant regulators could not complete the audit, a crucial step before the plane can be certified to return to service.

    The person said it could take "weeks" to satisfy regulators in a worst-case scenario, though Boeing believes it can address the omissions in a matter of days.

    Boeing spokesman Gordon Johndrone declined to comment in detail on the audit but said the company was "continuing to work with the regulators to safely return the MAX to service."

    The FAA did not immediately comment but in September, FAA Administrator Steve Dickson told Reuters the agency had conversations with Boeing "about the importance of making sure that we are looking at complete documentation and not piecemeal documentation."


    So now the FAA is doing the job they were supposed to be doing.

    He added the FAA told Boeing "it's really better to be very methodical and very detailed rather than try to rush a partially completed product and then say, ‘We’ll get back to you with the rest of it.’”

    A third person, familiar with FAA documentation audits but who did not participate in the 737 MAX review over the weekend, said such audits frequently uncover inconsistencies or omissions in documentation but rarely lead to changes to the underlying software or system.


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