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  1. #281
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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    The submarine pictured above was lead-acid battery powered and seemed to work okay. 30 years in service, spent time in the middle of rooski war games, where you wouldn't want to be hauling around any dead cells It should be possible, since it's been done.
    Diesel-electric submarines are military equipment and have full time electricians on board whose major job is maintaining those batteries and related electrics. They will as required jumper around bad cells and reconfigure the circuits as needed. This would not be practical on a locomotive. Also, as a ship a submarine can accommodate batteries of significant size and weight that would not fit in the confines of a locomotive.

    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    Regerative braking is is nothing new in electric locomotives. Everywhere else except US and India

    Kiruna(Sweden) to Narvik(Norway) Iron ore line produces excess energy with regenerative braking. Empty iron ore train takes less power going up than the full one generates in the downhill.
    IORE has 2x5400kW electric braking power that it feeds to distribution network.
    The distance from Kiruna to Narvik is something like 120 miles. The USA has about 140,000 miles of rail. India has about 75,000 miles of rail. As for total area ……

    Sweden: 173,732 square miles
    Norway: 125,182 square miles
    USA: 3,717,792 square miles
    India: 1,269,219 square miles

    A common mistake Europeans make is trying to directly compare their compact nations to much larger countries such as the USA and India.

    We do have fully electric railways such as our street cars/subways and some commuter rail. We also have electric buses that run on overhead wires in some cities. These of course can easily accommodate regenerative braking and in some cases already do. At one time a largely electric future was planned for the United States which undoubtedly would have included electrifying more rail lines. The problem is that the “electric future” was planned based on abundant nuclear power and if you’ll pardon the pun was “derailed” after massive opposition to nuclear power.

    Unfortunately too few people recognize that nuclear power is truly zero-carbon 24/7 all-weather sustainable energy and instead promote the fantasy of an all-electric future powered largely by solar, wind and other “sustainable” sources that are neither all-weather nor 24/7 available. This is a major part of the push for 5G wireless so it can provide connection for “the internet of things”, which will allow utilities to remotely shut off appliances during periods of low generating output as the power grid changes from a demand-based model to a generation-based model to accommodate the increased percentage of “sustainable” sources.

    The idea that heavy equipment will switch from diesel or diesel-electric to battery power is part of that same fantasy. While we could switch rail stock to all-electric, heavy construction equipment, tug boats and others such as long haul trucks that must operate independently of an electric network will remain fuel powered for the foreseeable future, although no doubt many may switch from pure diesel to diesel-electric. Many ocean-going tugs are already diesel-electric, which allows them to use rotatable electric thrusters instead of conventional propellers and rudders.

    PS: That Wabtec battery-electric locomotive is still just a concept. In the meantime Tier 4 diesel-electric locomotives are becoming a reality now.

    YouTube

    Tier 4 Locomotives | Metrolink

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  3. #282
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    Reasons the nuclear cant fill our total needed.
    Why nuclear power will never supply the world's energy needs

  4. #283
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    The distance from Kiruna to Narvik is something like 120 miles. The USA has about 140,000 miles of rail. India has about 75,000 miles of rail. As for total area ……

    Sweden: 173,732 square miles
    Norway: 125,182 square miles
    USA: 3,717,792 square miles
    India: 1,269,219 square miles

    A common mistake Europeans make is trying to directly compare their compact nations to much larger countries such as the USA and India.
    Much true but there is no way around it that US rail network is still at stone age(or diesel age..)
    We have population density 50% of the US and 1/50 total population but twice as much electrified railway network.

    Or China: 55 times more electrified railroad track than US.

    OK, you draw the population density and size of the country: Russia 30 times more electrified track in a country considerably larger than US and only with 30% population density.

    List of countries by rail transport network size - Wikipedia
    Last edited by MattiJ; 12-02-2019 at 02:09 PM. Reason: edit: forgot the linky-link

  5. #284
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    The distance from Kiruna to Narvik is something like 120 miles. The USA has about 140,000 miles of rail. India has about 75,000 miles of rail. As for total area ……

    Sweden: 173,732 square miles
    Norway: 125,182 square miles
    USA: 3,717,792 square miles
    India: 1,269,219 square miles

    A common mistake Europeans make is trying to directly compare their compact nations to much larger countries such as the USA and India.
    Your facts are correct but try checking the distance from north to south for Norway, Sweden and Finland.

    Facts are like statistics - depends on who and how you look at them.

    A straight line along Norway's sea borders (the coastal perimeter) is 2,650 kilometers (1,650 mi) long. Along the coast there are many fjords, islands, and bays, resulting in a low-resolution coastline of over 25,000 kilometers (16,000 mi).

    How long is the USA coast line?

  6. #285
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    Your facts are correct but try checking the distance from north to south for Norway, Sweden and Finland.

    Facts are like statistics - depends on who and how you look at them.

    A straight line along Norway's sea borders (the coastal perimeter) is 2,650 kilometers (1,650 mi) long. Along the coast there are many fjords, islands, and bays, resulting in a low-resolution coastline of over 25,000 kilometers (16,000 mi).

    How long is the USA coast line?
    According to NOAA it is 95,471mi.

  7. #286
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ziggy2 View Post
    According to NOAA it is 95,471mi.
    AND .... trains don't follow coastlines, they connect population centers.

    Another useless straw man argument from our favorite Eurocentrist. As if the length of coastline had ANYTHING to do with miles of rail.

  8. #287
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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    Reasons the nuclear cant fill our total needed.
    Why nuclear power will never supply the world's energy needs
    Not surprising that professor Abbott, an old school antinuclear activist, would twist facts to come to such a conclusion. Here is a rebuttal that analyzes and debunks his claims.


    And professor Abbott IS very much an antinuclear activist. He has many articles on this antinuclear site (antinuclear.net).


    There are many Climate Change believers who think nuclear power is a more practical zero carbon alternative to wind and solar.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    As if the length of coastline had ANYTHING to do with miles of rail.
    I didn't say it had. Neither does comparing horses with EVs.

    You're as easily offended now as you were. I wasn't be "anti American". Just pointing out that facts, like statistics, can be used and misused.

    ".... from our favorite Eurocentrist"


    I also suggest you look at what an Eurocentrist is. You might be one more than me

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    How did we get from EV to horses?
    Ask Elon Musk.... he wanted to make a pulling contest part of marketing and the proof of his truck and it's design.
    I do not understand the logic of even treading here but it does show Tesla.
    Bob

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    I found the "real horse" peak horsepower rating interesting because I was wondering about it once.

    100kg human can output about 2kW or close to 3hp peak so 30hp peak from 1000kg Clydesdale horse seems feasible.

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    In addition his numbers are meaningless because he apparently doesn't know the difference between consumption and capacity. He says global consumption is 15 terawatts. Consumption would be measured in watt/hours. One unit at Palo Verde produces over 11 terawatt/hours per year at 95% capacity.

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    Spreading anti nuclear activism in the west was the KGBs most successful operation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    The distance from Kiruna to Narvik is something like 120 miles. The USA has about 140,000 miles of rail. India has about 75,000 miles of rail. As for total area ……

    Sweden: 173,732 square miles
    Norway: 125,182 square miles
    USA: 3,717,792 square miles
    India: 1,269,219 square miles

    A common mistake Europeans make is trying to directly compare their compact nations to much larger countries such as the USA and India.
    Left yerself wide open on this one, buddy.

    China, 9,326,410.0 km2
    USA, 9,147,593.0

    China, > 10,000 miles 160 mph+ electric rail built in the last ten years
    (didn't look up freight train track but people's republic has a lot more of that, too)

    USA, 0

    That'd be 0 as in ZERO.

    Sorry, Bunky. Works fine in an area just as big as the US. In fact, it's faster and nicer to take the train between Shanghai and Beijing (782 miles) than a plane.

    Admit it, US is way behind the eight-ball on this one. Transportation in the US sucks unless you buy into the "I gotta have a cahhhh !" thing.


    addendum - recently took the Starlight from Seattle to LA. It was great. I have no idea why people put up with airports and airplane seating and last but not least, the stinking 'take off your shoes and underwear, sir' tsa. But it's okay 'cuz the fewer of them, the more room for me

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  19. #294
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    So wife and I talk campers a bunch.
    I ask her- “ya want to see a picture of a cool Tesla camper?”

    41befb5c-bd78-4bcc-9593-02ba67cd925f.jpg

    “Well that’s dumB looking, it’s just not pretty, no one likes angles like that”...

    Ok- so we aren’t getting a Tesla truck...

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    I found the "real horse" peak horsepower rating interesting because I was wondering about it once.

    100kg human can output about 2kW or close to 3hp peak so 30hp peak from 1000kg Clydesdale horse seems feasible.
    Dismounting a Clydesdale size horse last year I tore / stretched my tendons in both legs and could not walk standing straight up for almost a month..So riding a very tall horse is not the answer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    Spreading anti nuclear activism in the west was the KGBs most successful operation.
    Germany has lost much of its liking of Nuclear energy and Germans are pretty smart.
    I would like it if it was safer and all the costs like storing all the hot stuff was added into the equations of its true costs.

  22. #297
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    I would say that activism was at its height within the Soviets own borders.
    Chernobyl did a number on public confidence and rightly so...

    KGB:
    “Hey guys lets blow up one of our reactors, that will get the West to abandon their programs”...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trboatworks View Post
    I would say that activism was at its height within the Soviets own borders.
    Chernobyl did a number on public confidence and rightly so...

    KGB:
    “Hey guys lets blow up one of our reactors, that will get the West to abandon their programs”...
    Here is one costs estimate of the Chernobyl accident:
    Economic damage of the Chernobyl accident is estimated at $235 billion for 30 years on after the explosion, making up 32 national budgets as of 1985. Chernobyl disaster vastly damaged the agricultural sector of the Belarusian economy, which is worth over $700 million annually.

    one estimate of Japan accident:
    Mar 09, 2017 · In late 2016 the government estimated total costs from the nuclear accident at about 22 trillion yen, or about US$188 billion – approximately twice as high as its previous estimate.

    USA Three Mile Island
    The total cost of the cleanup was put at $1 billion. Unit No. 1 was restarted in 1985 and will be monitored until it and its twin reactor are decommissioned in 2014.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trboatworks View Post
    So wife and I talk campers a bunch.
    I ask her- “ya want to see a picture of a cool Tesla camper?”

    41befb5c-bd78-4bcc-9593-02ba67cd925f.jpg

    “Well that’s dumB looking, it’s just not pretty, no one likes angles like that”...

    Ok- so we aren’t getting a Tesla truck...
    You'll like angles like that, when you see how easy it is to fabricate.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    You'll like angles like that, when you see how easy it is to fabricate.....
    Looks like it would give you a low radar signature. Hmm ...

    So speaking of trains, I was taking a short hop on the subway tonight and they were showing the 49ers-Green Bay game on the monitors. (They usually have ads or public announcement cartoons, like "Don't jump down on the tracks if you drop your phone.") I ended up riding around for an hour.

    This place is strange sometimes


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