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  1. #101
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    Richard:

    I am not sure that I understand your post.

    The process or manufacturing engineering that I mentioned earlier when properly applied yields the most efficient way of working. Labor efficiency equals profit for the company.

    I think what you have experienced is the mis application or outright error in application. That causes the opposite effect and heavy drain on profit.

    If a company is going to have someone analyse a process they they have to have it done correctly the first time.

    People on the shop floor will naturally gravitate towards a workable system on their own. They do this to ease their own work.

    Outside interferance must visible improve conditions otherwise there will be tremendous resistance to it.

    I think it is mis applied outside interferance that causes the companies to fold up, even if they are making a good product. The messed up system causes a fatal loss of profit.

    OK, then the company can blame the Chinese or send the work out to them.

    "In Germany we are looking to make money with the repairs..."

    The same is true in the USA. The spare parts business often carries a manufacturer through times when his product isn't selling well. In good times, machine sales are up, in a recession, parts sales are up.

  2. #102
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    Ted,
    I'll be quite all right in the foxhole by myself- but if your Pop wants to come along, I would be honoured to share it with him.
    A man has to win his spurs and your old fella certainly did that.

    If Art D holds his Ole Glory the same as I hold mine, we'll get along just fine.

    Norm

  3. #103
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    I thought I understood this thread when it started . . . .
    . . . . Whadda ya know! Wrong again!

    Jim

  4. #104
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    What did Shakespeare say?

    'All's well that ends well'

    What would a Manxman know about tales anyway?

    My kindest regards from not far away

    Norm

  5. #105
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    I suppose I should not be astonished at how readily the old national stereotypes get dusted off and injected into these threads. When exhibiting at a trade show in the UK I always made sure to wear cowboy boots, on the theory that, by conforming to the Europeans' image of an American, I might get their mental constructs out of the way and possibly connect on an engineering (and, hopefully, a sales) level. I don't know whether it had any effect. Anyway, since that city has a wudu right in the airport, I have come to regard my presence there as asking for trouble, so my company doesn't go any more.

    But, I digress. My purpose was to respond to Mr. Atkinson's unwarranted defense of Lucas automotive electrics, which are not only indefensible but have been a perennial blot on the reputation of English car builders. "Achilles heel" would not be putting it too strongly. Personally, I favor "Kiss of Death." Now, esteemed Sir, before you reject my viewpoint as biased, may I say that one of your posts on another thread struck a certain chord. You cited such career-success benchmarks as (forgive me, this isn't verbatim) "...a Jaguar with personal license plate, an expensive car for the wife, and a net worth in the millions, either Sterling or Euro..." I just happen to meet those particular criteria: a 2006 XJR for myself, a positively grotesque Lincoln Navigator for the wife, as well as the other thing. To top it off, my maternal grandmother was an Atkinson, so I practically share the crest. So, although I lack an ancestral home (my family on both sides were Tories and were dispossessed in the Revolution--those who weren't hanged) I trust you will accept that I have no inherent CULTURAL bias against British engineering.

    So, on to the point here. In 2004, after they had been owned by Ford long enough for it to show, I test-drove a Jag XJ8 for the first time. It blew away the SL500 I had been planning to buy. The salesman smiled knowingly and said, "Jaguar has always been known for three things: handling, luxury--AND THEY'VE FIXED THAT THIRD THING!"
    I said, "Ah, the Prince..." "...Of Darkness, yes," he replied.

    Hey, when you don't even need to mention the name, it speaks volumes. Cheers.

  6. #106
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    I am awfully sorry but my experience of Lucas goes back to- hushhhhhhhhhhh- a Morris 8 with 6 volt lighting and a date of 1935.
    I think that I have never had a happorth of bother from Joseph Lucas in- well, dozens of cars. I drove professionally as well as for pleasure and never had less than two vehicles at a time. Perhaps, everything else fell off but the Lucas electrics were sound enough.
    I have a City and Guilds in Motor Vehicles Repair and Restoration and built and tuned BMC A series engines and all that.
    Maybe your Lucas stuff was different to mine- and I have accept your experiences.
    Going out for a set of points and a condenser on a routine service was from any old outlet and cost pennies.

    Contrast that with a £30,000 Mercedes which died at 5000 miles from new! Have you any idea how long it took to get an EMU from Stuttgart?
    My Answer Phone is still having a row- about corrosion, about discs, the front coils went in 3 years! We are not talking about Wallmart prices!

    We just came back from 250 North- up in Cairngorms. Blackadder country- Oh offspring of a famous bunch of reprobates. Yea, I said to the Missus," Do you realise that if we had had a no street cred Hynundai- bought for washers- it would still be in guarantee.
    Merc, me old matey, isn't!The car is 5 years old!

    So- I would hate to write what the Queen of the Night had to say in reply!

    So to Family Crests- well? I have two!Oh, and a castle- ruined- of course. Tony, it does help to quote the family name.
    I got an E-mail from some bird who wanted to know the sex life of Sir Joseph Whitworth. Thought that I had written his history.
    Tony, I never had the low cunning to become a British Member of Parliament. Think of the disgrace that I would bring on the family escutcheon.

    Well, Tony, time to let the rest of the lesser mortals have a bit of space. To my cousin across the pond, keep on being a stroppy Atkinson!

    Cousin Norm

  7. #107
    art_deco_machine Guest

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    Well, to come back to the original posting, after much digression, or maybe it was digestion, since it seemed a little fishy and hard to swallow that Germany lacked engineers, the London Telegraph has printed an article, Nov. 6, reprinted by the Washington Times on their web page, concerning the exodus of skilled workers from Germany:

    Fed up with dwindling job prospects, high taxes, bureaucracy and a still sluggish economy at home, a record 144,000 Germans turned their backs on the Fatherland last year to find employment in neighboring countries such as Switzerland, Austria, Poland and Britain and as far afield as the United States and Canada.
    It is the largest exodus since the mass emigration of the 1880s and is seen in Germany as a threat to the country's faltering economy.
    Yes, German industrialists appear quite concerned over this 'brain drain':
    Dieter Zetsche, the head of the giant German car manufacturer DaimlerChrysler AG, said German industrialists had good reason to be concerned.
    "It is, above all, the well-educated and motivated who are emigrating, the people who are of immense value to us," he said. "This cannot be allowed to continue."
    Things do not sound good:

    [quote] Last year, the number of graduates leaving the country exceeded the number entering it for the first time since the 1950s.
    Stephanie Wahl, a spokesman for the Bonn-based Institute for Economics, said: "Those who are leaving Germany are mostly highly motivated and well-educated. Those coming in are mostly poor, untrained and hardly educated."

    Brain Drain Worries Industry

  8. #108
    art_deco_machine Guest

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    Well, to come back to the original posting, after much digression, or maybe it was digestion, since it seemed a little fishy and hard to swallow that Germany lacked engineers, the London Telegraph has printed an article, Nov. 6, reprinted by the Washington Times on their web page, concerning the exodus of skilled workers from Germany:

    Fed up with dwindling job prospects, high taxes, bureaucracy and a still sluggish economy at home, a record 144,000 Germans turned their backs on the Fatherland last year to find employment in neighboring countries such as Switzerland, Austria, Poland and Britain and as far afield as the United States and Canada.
    It is the largest exodus since the mass emigration of the 1880s and is seen in Germany as a threat to the country's faltering economy.
    Yes, German industrialists appear quite concerned over this 'brain drain':
    Dieter Zetsche, the head of the giant German car manufacturer DaimlerChrysler AG, said German industrialists had good reason to be concerned.
    "It is, above all, the well-educated and motivated who are emigrating, the people who are of immense value to us," he said. "This cannot be allowed to continue."
    Things do not sound good:

    Last year, the number of graduates leaving the country exceeded the number entering it for the first time since the 1950s.
    Stephanie Wahl, a spokesman for the Bonn-based Institute for Economics, said: "Those who are leaving Germany are mostly highly motivated and well-educated. Those coming in are mostly poor, untrained and hardly educated."
    Brain Drain Worries Industry

  9. #109
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    "Those who are leaving Germany are mostly highly motivated and well-educated. Those coming in are mostly poor, untrained and hardly educated."
    No surprise there. The upper middle classes are fleeing Europe in droves, led by the Dutch. As far as the Dutch are concerned, the English speaking countries are the destinations of choice.

    Taxes, bureaucracy and liberal oppression seem to be making those who can do so vote with their feet.

    Regards, Jim

  10. #110
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    say what you want about german engineering, everytime I drive my BMW 540i Sport Wagon I am amazed at how good it is. Nobody, NOBODY else makes a car that drives like a BMW. Not even close!.

  11. #111
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    Liquid fueled rocket. Dr. Robert Goddard launched first liquid fueled rocket on March 16, 1926. Tried to interest US government but refused and was ridiculed by peers. Germans built on his earlier work. Also early work by Russia. See Wikipedia.


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