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  1. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by salzburg View Post
    If a third of all cars in the US were electric you would have nothing but BROWNOUTS and BLACKOUTS
    The vast majority of EVs are charged at night, when demand is low.

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    With a name like Jaguar36 have you seen the jaguar Factory E-type conversion? You bring them the car and they replace the engine and transmission, throw in some batteries and voila!
    Bil lD.

    Jaguar Will Build You an Electric E-Type Just Like Prince Harry's

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    With a name like Jaguar36 have you seen the jaguar Factory E-type conversion? You bring them the car and they replace the engine and transmission, throw in some batteries and voila!
    Bil lD.
    "they replace the engine and transmission, throw in some batteries" Nothing new there with most any Brit produced car or cycle....

    Oh wait...you mean they convert them to EV. Well that gets rid of the oil leaks and no start in damp weather.

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    And in other "EV" news....

    Consider "Electric Last Mile Solutions" (ELMS). Might want to watch the stock.

    Will occupy former Hummer plant in South Bend. They report 30K preorders. Sounds like it's a Chinese owned company.

    MSRP of $32K with an after tax credit price of $25K.

    150 mile range which they say for light delivery vehicles is more than enough and keeps price down.

    In one interview says body and such produced off shore with battery/motor/control (skateboard) sourced in the U.S. although the big question I guess is who will own the vendors.

    UAW says it's "in talks". Good luck on that one UAW.

    Interesting point is the vehicle broadcasts constant delivery data which might might mean the data might have great value?

    Anyway...Am sure the price point is for large fleet sales but can see where a business could find this an attractive vehicle for light delivery and running errands.

    Here's a link to some news coverage..... $FIII Electric Last Mile Merger DD : SPACs

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    A solar puts out about 14-20 watts per square foot on the good sunny days.

    A 60 watt light bulb takes 60 watts. Electric furnace about 10,000 watts, hot water heater about 45.000 watts, Charging an EV battery about 40 kilawatts, drinking warm beer no watts.

    so the key to EV use is drinking warm beer.

    Yes, we need to invent wind-up refrigerators.

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  7. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by standardparts View Post
    "they replace the engine and transmission, throw in some batteries" Nothing new there with most any Brit produced car or cycle....

    Oh wait...you mean they convert them to EV. Well that gets rid of the oil leaks and no start in damp weather.
    I believe they crate up the engine and transmission and return them. Including the SU carbs.

  8. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    A solar puts out about 14-20 watts per square foot on the good sunny days.

    A 60 watt light bulb takes 60 watts. Electric furnace about 10,000 watts, hot water heater about 45.000 watts, Charging an EV battery about 40 kilawatts, drinking warm beer no watts.

    so the key to EV use is drinking warm beer.

    Yes, we need to invent wind-up refrigerators.
    Got to love guys like you who keep saying you can’t do something that I am actually doing
    If I wanted to invest in enough battery capacity I could easily be off the grid with solar.
    Same for the rest of the south west and Hawaii.

    You don’t use electric water or furnace or for the cook top, ng is much more efficient and cheaper.
    Only the idiots in a few places want to get rid of ng for everything.
    And if you are still using old 60w bulbs you are a moron LED lights use way less energy.

    Storage capacity is the big problem right now for solar,
    EVs charged during day time actually help solve that problem

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    On a new build detached dwelling house here ,you must include 5kW of solar EV panels,and a solar hot water system ,which handles all the needs of the house 85% of the whole year......and in practice ,the electric booster of the solar hot water is hardly ever used......The solar water is hot enough to boil on all but 10/10th overcast,and even then ,is still able to maintain 140F.....Rain does not draw heat from the exposed part of the system......snow might be a big ask though.

  11. #189
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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    On a new build detached dwelling house here ,you must include 5kW of solar EV panels,and a solar hot water system ,which handles all the needs of the house 85% of the whole year......and in practice ,the electric booster of the solar hot water is hardly ever used......The solar water is hot enough to boil on all but 10/10th overcast,and even then ,is still able to maintain 140F.....Rain does not draw heat from the exposed part of the system......snow might be a big ask though.
    That would work fine in our more temperate states but here up north we get lots of snowfall and often less sun due to cloudy weather. A relative owns a passive solar house that was built long before photovoltaic panels became common. Heating is by wood stove encased in a masonry mass and the house is designed to keep that central to all rooms. Only in the most bitter weather is the backup gas heat required. A friend, now deceased who was an architect who strongly encouraged home clients to use passive solar design and site placement to maximise solar heat in winter and minimize exposure in summer.

    PS: I forgot to mention the "sun room" which has a dark painted masonry mass facing a wall of windows. Automatic dampers and fans control airflow to maximize use of the solar heat when available. The wood stove is only needed for a couple months in winter and it is a high efficiency model.

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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    A solar puts out about 14-20 watts per square foot on the good sunny days.

    A 60 watt light bulb takes 60 watts. Electric furnace about 10,000 watts, hot water heater about 45.000 watts, Charging an EV battery about 40 kilawatts, drinking warm beer no watts.

    so the key to EV use is drinking warm beer.

    Yes, we need to invent wind-up refrigerators.
    What moron would use an electric furnace[wait full stop there] with PV?

    A roof full of solar panels can usually supply the average demands of a house[that is not owned by morons]

    The further north you go the more the winter affects the balance.

    Why do you think intelligent to make arguments based on 1955 logic?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    That would work fine in our more temperate states but here up north we get lots of snowfall and often less sun due to cloudy weather. A relative owns a passive solar house that was built long before photovoltaic panels became common. Heating is by wood stove encased in a masonry mass and the house is designed to keep that central to all rooms. Only in the most bitter weather is the backup gas heat required. A friend, now deceased who was an architect who strongly encouraged home clients to use passive solar design and site placement to maximise solar heat in winter and minimize exposure in summer.

    PS: I forgot to mention the "sun room" which has a dark painted masonry mass facing a wall of windows. Automatic dampers and fans control airflow to maximize use of the solar heat when available. The wood stove is only needed for a couple months in winter and it is a high efficiency model.
    Your relative isn't a car guy up near Wakefield NH by any chance? OR maybe I have my locations confused, the car I looked at was in Wakefield at some point... Met a guy with a pretty cool passive place some years back. Maybe the Solar house was in Andover or something

    There is quite some debate as to PV vs passive. I like you grew up with a lot of talk of passive solar and still believe it works

    Here is the short story: minimize the amount of heat you need in the first place, air tightness and super insulation. When you do that the amount of glass you need falls drastically, and solar gain starts being a nuisance, you are better off putting PV on the roof an be able to use it for more than just heat.

    Now mind you, I am presenting you an argument I do not 100 percent agree with, but that is the argument. It speaks to the extensive work required to get a fully solar house to work, when the alternative is a more 'normal' house if you will.

    If I am designing a house, it still gets the windows on the south side[IOW buy land on the north shore of the lake if you need to heat it]

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    Glad to hear some discussion on passive solar. I also live in a passive solar house (shop also), a high mass passive solar house, that is very comfortable and needs very little supplemental heating. We also live in an area that needs minimal cooling in the summer so passive solar keeps us from needing AC.

    One of the issues with passive solar design is most books and web sites discuss the 100% solution which makes for additional costs and a weird looking house. But if you try for partial passive solar design, the additional cost is minimal and the house can look normal, as is ours.

    The basics of passive solar are most of the windows on the south(Northern Hemi), with proper overhang for the latitude, none on the west(overheating in summer), minimal windows on East and North. Highest mass possible, insulated slab on grade, no concrete exposed to air, well insulated, south windows with coatings for south exposure passive solar, good windows, etc.

    It is not that hard to implement and the comfort gains alone are worth it.

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  16. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by gustafson View Post
    Your relative isn't a car guy up near Wakefield NH by any chance? OR maybe I have my locations confused, the car I looked at was in Wakefield at some point... Met a guy with a pretty cool passive place some years back. Maybe the Solar house was in Andover or something

    There is quite some debate as to PV vs passive. I like you grew up with a lot of talk of passive solar and still believe it works

    Here is the short story: minimize the amount of heat you need in the first place, air tightness and super insulation. When you do that the amount of glass you need falls drastically, and solar gain starts being a nuisance, you are better off putting PV on the roof an be able to use it for more than just heat.

    Now mind you, I am presenting you an argument I do not 100 percent agree with, but that is the argument. It speaks to the extensive work required to get a fully solar house to work, when the alternative is a more 'normal' house if you will.

    If I am designing a house, it still gets the windows on the south side[IOW buy land on the north shore of the lake if you need to heat it]
    House is in New Hampster and it also has provision for passive summer cooling through creative venting that encourages natural convection flow. My architect friend was fond of pointing out the importance of roof overhangs based on the seasonal angle of the sun for that geographic location. Done right the low angle winter sun hits the windows while the steeper summer sun creates shadows from the overhang. Years ago before we got replacement windows we had permanent awnings over the windows most vulnerable to summer heat. After they were installed summer temperatures were considerably cooler.

    There is no one stop solution and it is possible to combine passive and photovoltaic in the same house. An interesting development is that Generac, the generator people, are now advertising an inverter/battery storage product as an adjunct to rooftop solar. It is claimed that in addition to saving money it can provide power during a grid failure.

    One element of passive solar that is often overlooked these days is large deciduous trees. Ours give us shade in the summer when the leaves are on but allow more sun in the winter after the leaves have fallen. Too many developers today clear cut properties and then rely on the house to do all the work.

    PS: My relative bought the house used years ago at an attractive price because the design scared off many potential buyers. As an engineer he was attracted to it rather than scared off, and got a very comfortable practical house at a bargain. His wife was skeptical at first but soon grew to love the house, as did their kids.

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    I have always favoured the most basic and cheap form of solar energy storage ....the wood fire.....probably because I have lots of wood ......Unfortunately ,wood fires are a big political score here,and there is always some pitiful child with woodsmoke allergies so bad as to be life threatening can be trotted out at election time to demonize wood stoves and fireplaces.

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  19. #195
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    Quote Originally Posted by 72bwhite View Post
    Got to love guys like you who keep saying you can’t do something that I am actually doing
    If I wanted to invest in enough battery capacity I could easily be off the grid with solar.
    Same for the rest of the south west and Hawaii.

    You don’t use electric water or furnace or for the cook top, ng is much more efficient and cheaper.
    Only the idiots in a few places want to get rid of ng for everything.
    And if you are still using old 60w bulbs you are a moron LED lights use way less energy.

    Storage capacity is the big problem right now for solar,
    EVs charged during day time actually help solve that problem
    So far nothing exists which solves the problem which is a reasonable and sustaining solution.

    If you have enough money you could buy those batteries. Yet it likely would only be because you are a enthusiast for such energy though well intentioned for sure.

    It is your decision there is nothing wrong with that. It is admirable really. On the balance of the whole issue most citizens are not able to pay for solar pane;s and many that can do not have enough money for battery storage of energy.

    Doesn’t this make sense to you that not many can afford Tesla’s wall for storage including all integrated components which go with the package? This effort would include changing the grid extensively using instead storage and many solar panels taking up land in the process.

    Pricing them and providing the ROI proves whether it is a good path as is current technology. Explain why the people overseeing our electrical power generation are not doing fairly robust investments using these currently available systems.

    Or no need to bother if you are really conscientious about your personal investment in such. Yet as far as a large public investment is concerned it is premature à effort.

    One thing not proven is how changing the current generation of power can be a viable and sound investment. This is a high bar to jump over.


    Eventually all the investment vs the viability of changing current methods will prove at a certain point to be wasted. Many would say then don’t do it. Others will say we must to learn more.

    The return on investment in this is currently like losing money at the casino.

    What is coming that will work? Answer is likely functioning battery power so energy can be stored.

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    Almost fake news, look it can even run the furnace..but wait that is a natural gas furnace so the generator, wait it is not a generator but is a battery .. so it can run the furnace fan motor for perhaps 2 hours as long as the furnace has gas to provide the heT..
    That is how fake news fools the ill and misinformed to think a lot of garbaglygook.


    Ultimate Home Generator? - Ecoflow Delta / Portable Backup Power - YouTube


    Much like, an average wind turbine that’s working at optimal capacity would be able to generate enough energy to power 332 homes per year.

    Yes at the current usage where they have natural gas so the electric is just running the furnace fan motor and lighting..Not providing the Heat..that might/likely would be 10x more energy. But the ill-informed are spending my tax money with not telling the whole story..if they even bothered to learn the whole story.

    Much like that president who said the USA can be a service economy..but wait people who are out of work cut their own grass.

    Being sole a bill of goods (lies) seems to be becoming more common every day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trueturning View Post
    So far nothing exists which solves the problem which is a reasonable and sustaining solution.

    If you have enough money you could buy those batteries. Yet it likely would only be because you are a enthusiast for such energy though well intentioned for sure.

    It is your decision there is nothing wrong with that. It is admirable really. On the balance of the whole issue most citizens are not able to pay for solar pane;s and many that can do not have enough money for battery storage of energy.

    Doesn’t this make sense to you that not many can afford Tesla’s wall for storage including all integrated components which go with the package? This effort would include changing the grid extensively using instead storage and many solar panels taking up land in the process.

    Pricing them and providing the ROI proves whether it is a good path as is current technology. Explain why the people overseeing our electrical power generation are not doing fairly robust investments using these currently available systems.

    Or no need to bother if you are really conscientious about your personal investment in such. Yet as far as a large public investment is concerned it is premature à effort.

    One thing not proven is how changing the current generation of power can be a viable and sound investment. This is a high bar to jump over.


    Eventually all the investment vs the viability of changing current methods will prove at a certain point to be wasted. Many would say then don’t do it. Others will say we must to learn more.

    The return on investment in this is currently like losing money at the casino.

    What is coming that will work? Answer is likely functioning battery power so energy can be stored.

    Very good post!!

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  24. #198
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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    Almost fake news, look it can even run the furnace..but wait that is a natural gas furnace so the generator, wait it is not a generator but is a battery .. so it can run the furnace fan motor for perhaps 2 hours as long as the furnace has gas to provide the heT..
    That is how fake news fools the ill and misinformed to think a lot of garbaglygook.


    Ultimate Home Generator? - Ecoflow Delta / Portable Backup Power - YouTube


    Much like, an average wind turbine that’s working at optimal capacity would be able to generate enough energy to power 332 homes per year.

    Yes at the current usage where they have natural gas so the electric is just running the furnace fan motor and lighting..Not providing the Heat..that might/likely would be 10x more energy. But the ill-informed are spending my tax money with not telling the whole story..if they even bothered to learn the whole story.

    Much like that president who said the USA can be a service economy..but wait people who are out of work cut their own grass.

    Being sole a bill of goods (lies) seems to be becoming more common every day.
    One correction is in order. gas heating systems can function without electricity. It is only circulation blowers and pumps that require it. A neighbor has a gas heated steam radiator system and it has functioned through numerous blackouts. A thermopile provides the tiny amount of electricity for the controls. There are two drawbacks - the system has a pilot light that uses a tiny amount of gas and as a steam system air must be regularly purged or the pipes corrode.

    We have oil heat which requires electricity for the burner pump and circulator pump. However, we have a gas hot water heater that provides hot water even in a blackout, That, a gas stove and a wood burning fireplace have gotten us through more than a few winter blackouts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    I have always favoured the most basic and cheap form of solar energy storage ....the wood fire.....probably because I have lots of wood ......Unfortunately ,wood fires are a big political score here,and there is always some pitiful child with woodsmoke allergies so bad as to be life threatening can be trotted out at election time to demonize wood stoves and fireplaces.

    They have been "trotting out" sick people for centuries as cities can become unlivable from wood and coal smog.

    Great Smog of London - Wikipedia

    It is not the wood burning- it's too many damn people living too close.
    We have been going camping again at the great state parks Maryland has- wow its nice to have a campfire and come home all smoky smelling.
    Close neighbors mean we lose much of our rights to do what we will- no plinking in the back yard, no fires or dogs barking..

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    I think there should have been many fleets of vehicles government ones replaced with electric by now as they have been talking about it for many years. I suppose seeing a electric powered 18 wheeler truck might be very useful.

    The ICE will be eliminated in less than two decades? Like other proposed goals from government I will point out that there is a lot of hope and faith here in this declaration. That is ok and yet any solid process step by step is not presented as a working model for reaching that goal.

    I do not mind a change as long as it is actually a good move ROI wise. If there are other reasons why the ROI is not important and something else is important to do this then why not talk about it instead of not even mentioning it?


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