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Thread: Howard Hughes

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    First you have to lose another hydrogen bomb.
    The Glomar Explorer was used to salvage the Russian submarine K 129 from 16,000' deep in the pacific ocean. It had nothing to do with any lost hydrogen bomb.

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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    The Glomar Explorer was used to salvage the Russian submarine K 129 from 16,000' deep in the pacific ocean. It had nothing to do with any lost hydrogen bomb.
    I seem to recall that the Glomar MAY have picked a lost piece of ordnance out of the ocean.

    There were several folks I know or knew that worked at HAC. Mr Hughes had several retreats for staff to contemplate ideas and develop stuff, the one in Malibu was especially nice. One of my neighbors was a very senior engineer that used to take the "shuttle" to Groom Lake often.

    The old HAC airport in Playa Del Rey is now Playa Vista, I remember when they flew AH64's out of there. The 1930's to the mid 80's were the hay days of aviation and space in So Cal. There was so much talent do such amazing things, it was great to grow up there in the 1960's

    Steve

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    I went to school in Machining at LA Trade Tech in the 80s- and my teacher was a retired McDonnell Douglas machinist, Tommy Honda. He was a great teacher, and an old school machinist. Nobody touched any tool but a grinder until they could sharpen, to HIS satisfaction, 3 different points of drill bit, and 8 different profiles of lathe tools. Then, he let you use a drill press. Some of the students were still grinding at Christmas, and class started in September. And about half the class didnt come back in January. Happened every year, Mr. Honda didnt seem surprised or troubled by it, more time for him to work with those of us still there.

    The aerospace infrastructure started moving out of LA in the fifties, though, and by the end of the 80s, its was much smaller, and more CNC, with far fewer machinists. Still a lot of support infrastructure, though- I worked with amazing subs- industrial blacksmiths, foundries, machine shops, the biggest sandblasters and anodizers and plating shops in the west- on many projects I did until I moved north in 95. There still is a steel mill, out in Fontana- you could get pretty much anything industrial in LA in those days. I used to use a shop, probably 20 guys, who just did deburring, and they were right down the road from the place that did deep draw stamping of 150mm artillery shells.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    I worked at Hughes Aircraft in Culver City (Power Systems Group) during part of the F/A-18 project. Was cool to walk out of the building and watch a fighter jet land
    on a near by runway. The facility was making helicopters for the military too.

    See the coffee mug.Attachment 288273
    ha! brings back memories to see a breadboard project, wow, havn't even thought 'bout those in a while...although the DIP chips I was messing around with in the 70s and early 80s were a tiny bit different than that one..

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    To respond to the original post, my own inspiration was Henry Ford. Well before my time, and I never met him or worked there, but the sheer magnitude of his accomplishments in the area of production machining, especially dedicated hard tooling, dwarfs anything contemplated by the machine tool builders of the time. Impossible to make a machine to bore eight cylinders at the same time, they said. They said that to a guy who had started out after hours in a tiny garage well into middle age, and who owned the mines for the ore, the ships to haul it, the furnaces to melt it, and a total factory floor area larger than all of theirs put together. He who laughs last, etc...

    I probably would not have liked him personally, but the same would be true for Hughes, Edison, and any number of industrial geniuses who were driven to an extent that would burn out an NFL coach in a week.

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    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    The Glomar Explorer was used to salvage the Russian submarine K 129 from 16,000' deep in the pacific ocean. It had nothing to do with any lost hydrogen bomb.
    A consortium between the American Central intelligence agency CIA and the Hughes corporation, Hughes had the means and the CIA wanted the cover story that the ship has for deep sea oil exploration. Most of the people that worked building on the ship never knew it's real intent. The sub broke apart during the raising process. Human remains where found within the sub, the powers that be gave them a proper burial at sea and filmed the event and some time later gave a copy of that film to the Soviet government.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyanidekid View Post
    ha! brings back memories to see a breadboard project, wow, havn't even thought 'bout those in a while...although the DIP chips I was messing around with in the 70s and early 80s were a tiny bit different than that one..
    LOL! We had sold an early days 1000 line a minute "drum" printer to Rome Air Development Center "systems integrated" to... something or other ....

    John M_, the Engineer who had commissioned it, was out at Ford Ord when they asked for service to it. So I started to saddle up to go up there and cover it. Got out the schematic logic diagrams. Now . .it was RTL, DCL, DTL and early TTL 'mixed fruit salad" dazez back then.

    So I got John on the horn:

    "John? WTF logic family and from which MAKER mixes AND and NAND and OR all in one package and on the same gate like this bugger uses?"

    John started to actually cackle through the phone as if he were shitting dinosaur eggs!

    When he got his breath back?

    "NONE, he sez." There isn't even ONE "integrated circuit" in that beast. What you have is right around twenty-two hundred discrete transistors, all same package."

    "No sweat, John, I can deal with that in a matter of minutes."

    "Impossible!"

    "Nope. Dead easy from where I sit. More than just 2 hats."

    "The stingey USAF buggers let our maintenance contract lapse three years ago.

    "Other "hat" is responding with "no-bid" on the tender for renewal!"

    We DID end up fixing it when John was next available. But at fully-burdened "Field Engineer A" rates, T&M + T&L & per-diem.

    Not at no flat-rate extended warranty dice-roll!

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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    I worked at Hughes Aircraft in Culver City (Power Systems Group) during part of the F/A-18 project. Was cool to walk out of the building and watch a fighter jet land
    on a near by runway. The facility was making helicopters for the military too.

    See the coffee mug.Attachment 288273
    Too cool Ron’s.

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    I thought the Glomar Challenger cover story was they would be picking up lumps of metal ore just sitting around on the ocean floor. these lumps were rumored to be all over the floor in parts of the ocean and loaded with nickel, iron and other useful metals. Kind of like raking clams and oysters from surface boats.
    Bill D

    Manganese nodule - Wikipedia

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    I thought the Glomar Challenger cover story was they would be picking up lumps of metal ore just sitting around on the ocean floor. these lumps were rumored to be all over the floor in parts of the ocean and loaded with nickel, iron and other useful metals. Kind of like raking clams and oysters from surface boats.
    Bill D

    Manganese nodule - Wikipedia
    There have been over the years many discussions as to the real intent of the Hughes Glomar explorer.
    The Hughes USNS Glomar explorer was a deep sea drilling platform code named Azorian by the Central Intelligence agency.
    Purpose built for 350 million dollars by the Sun ship building yards along with Hughes corporation as a top secret effort to recover the Soviet submarine K-129 which as I stated in a earlier post broke apart towards the surface, however the CIA did consider it a successes. what was found is still classified to this day. Although some time after the recovery we did disclose to the soviet government through film of the returning to the sea of soviet seamen's remains found in the subs hull.

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    There's an interesting documentary called "Azorian: the raising of the k-129". Lots of interviews with people who were there. It's free on Amazon video of you have prime.


    Sent from my Nokia 7.1 using Tapatalk

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    My wife and I toured the Spruce Goose and the Queen Mary when we visited Long Beach in 1989. I recall how big the goose was and the machine shop in the bowels of the QM was pretty impressive for a non land based shop.

    But one thing that always stuck with me about Hughes was a line from the movie that was made about him. He was somewhere with his people and wanted to buy something. One of the people that was with him told him to get some money out and pay for it or something like that. He said that if you have money you don't need to carry it around with you. "Some people will kill you for a hundred dollars" is the line that really stuck with me and to this day I don't regularly carry a lot of cash with me. My dad always used to carry a stack of hundreds in his wallet but not me, it made such an impression on me.
    Last edited by Big B; 05-17-2020 at 07:46 PM. Reason: Made a correction

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    We all know about Hughes Tool and the drill bits that made American petroleum industry. I have to ask who is behind/developed the directional drilling heads? It has turned the oil markets completely around in the lase couple of decades yet I have never seen a directional drilling head/tip or whatever it is. Is it still Hughes Tool?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big B View Post
    My wife and I toured the Spruce Goose and the Queen Elizabeth when we visited Long Beach in 1989. I recall how big the goose was and the machine shop in the bowels of the QE was pretty impressive for a non land based shop.
    Did you mean the Queen Mary?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big B View Post
    My wife and I toured the Spruce Goose and the Queen Elizabeth when we visited Long Beach in 1989. I recall how big the goose was and the machine shop in the bowels of the QE was pretty impressive for a non land based shop.

    But one thing that always stuck with me about Hughes was a line from the movie that was made about him. He was somewhere with his people and wanted to buy something. One of the people that was with him told him to get some money out and pay for it or something like that. He said that if you have money you don't need to carry it around with you. "Some people will kill you for a hundred dollars" is the line that really stuck with me and to this day I don't regularly carry a lot of cash with me. My dad always used to carry a stack of hundreds in his wallet but not me, it made such an impression on me.
    Howard Hughes was notorious for dressing in work clothes and driving plain black Chevy's. Before he went paranoid he was quite the guy.

    Steve

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Did you mean the Queen Mary?
    Yes, old age seems to be affecting my memory from 30 plus years ago. I got my queens mixed up. Thanks for the heads up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hobbyman View Post
    We all know about Hughes Tool and the drill bits that made American petroleum industry. I have to ask who is behind/developed the directional drilling heads? It has turned the oil markets completely around in the lase couple of decades yet I have never seen a directional drilling head/tip or whatever it is. Is it still Hughes Tool?
    About three years ago, we produced a battery header for a directional drill head that utilized GPS technology.

    Up until that point, the drill head battery only lasted around three weeks. Then it had to be retrieved and replaced with a new unit. Our header allowed a six month drill cycle.

    At least that was the story.

    I know nothing about the drill head, but I would give a pretty penny to see it, first hand.

    Just sayin'

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    Worked briefly at Daddy Hughes plant in east Houston as a contractor - must of been 40 years ago now. Long white building along the RR on Polk Ave

    Houston Deco | 1940s | Hughes Tool Company, Inc.

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    What the Polk Avenue plant looked like in 1924

    old-hughes-tool.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by hobbyman View Post
    We all know about Hughes Tool and the drill bits that made American petroleum industry. I have to ask who is behind/developed the directional drilling heads? It has turned the oil markets completely around in the lase couple of decades yet I have never seen a directional drilling head/tip or whatever it is. Is it still Hughes Tool?
    The directional drill motors were developed by other companies out there. Hughes Tool Company never did anything with drill motors. They didn't have time for that. At the time, they were up to their eyeballs making drill pipe and tri-cone drill bits. One of the early ones was Dyni-Drill in the mud motor business. They also made the kick off subs back then too. They were not the only one's in the business neither. I'm not up to speed on the others out there. The bits used on the directional motors are mostly PDC/carbide bits used today.

    My brother works for NOV-Grant-Prideco, who owns what's left of the Hughes Tool Co. drill pipe line. The drill bit line was absorbed up by Baker Oil Tools, Now Baker-Hughes, and was moved up to the Woodlands, merged with the Christensen diamond bit division.

    Brother told me, he has looked at many of the old Hugh Tool Co. drawings and found the drill pipe drawings used for that drill ship back then. He said there were massive size connections used on that pipe they had back then. If I recall, that same drill ship was used on the Project Moe-Hole back in the 1960's., too. Ken


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