Industrial past as sculpture.
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 39
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Maryland- USA
    Posts
    3,416
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1966
    Likes (Received)
    2166

    Default Industrial past as sculpture.

    I suppose my shop is a art gallery now...

    Britain's Industrial History Reimagined for the Tate Commission

    Invalid URL

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Posts
    830
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    822
    Likes (Received)
    332

    Default

    Now,that's more like it. He keeps the machine intact,and appears to respect it as,and for what,it is. Good for him I say.

  3. Likes TheOldCar liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    2,599
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3052
    Likes (Received)
    479

    Default

    Interesting article. I like this kind of equipment it is not found everywhere anymore and a lot has been scrapped out.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    4,782
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3222
    Likes (Received)
    3628

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Trboatworks View Post

    Britain's Industrial History Reimagined for the Tate Commission
    well, we are talking about an organization that paid 50,000 pounds for a can shit. Should anything surprise?

  6. Likes adama liked this post
  7. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    50
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    20
    Likes (Received)
    18

    Default

    I appreciate that he hasn’t taken a torch or cutoff wheel to destroy the machines in the name of making art, but the grumpy side of me fails to see what he has contributed to make the installation ‘his’ art. All I see is a bunch of items that he has curated and put on various platforms. I don’t see any of his artistic input really.

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    BFE Nevada/San Marcos Tx
    Posts
    1,155
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1019
    Likes (Received)
    605

    Default

    For those that don't know, in order to be an artist you simply need to change the name of your workspace from shop to studio, funny hats help too

  9. Likes Mcgyver, DrHook, TheOldCar, Spud, TedinNorfolk liked this post
  10. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Eureka, CA
    Posts
    3,742
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    737
    Likes (Received)
    1284

    Default

    Nice link, thanks.

    From the pictures one would assume 'Duveen Galleries' is not located in a seismically active location.

    Stuart

  11. Likes TheOldCar, Ray Behner liked this post
  12. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Utah
    Posts
    928
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1991
    Likes (Received)
    360

    Default

    S E L F C O N T R O L

    Deep breaths, deep breaths....

    This is a personally sensitive issue to me, as I do the art thang.

    I have issue with “found art”. BIGTIME.

    These installations shown above at least have form and relatively minimum mods; I’m not saying I dislike them. My problem is with the found art fad infecting legitimate fine art shows and museums.

    You know the yard art trinkets for sale in West Yellowstone? A bison made of bike chains? Exhaust pipes booger-welded and Rustoleum rattle-canned into a green frog sculpture?

    And don’t get me started on pistons, camshafts and gears welded into anything from a desktop motorcycle toy to an animal...

    This, coupled with “steampunk” has been “trending now” (HATE that term) for too long; the fact that it gets in to fine art shows literally leaves me enraged.

    DEEEEEEEP BREATHS.

    Yes, art is subjective. I just don’t understand why found art can bypass all quality and legitimacy rules that bronze sculpting, oil painting, etc, must meet.

    I believe in what I call Process Art (I hope everyone is clapping for me, as I came up with that on my own ). That is (my) style of celebrating/joining the precision and beauty of machined, formed, punched, pressed, hammered and filed materials with form and beauty.
    Booger welds don’t fit here. Flap-disc grinder swirls with a cheap overdose of clearcoat don’t fit here (HOLY CRAP, every other lazer cut crapola sign has that finish here in Utah. How long did it take, 15 minutes?!?!?!??).
    Rustic is everywhere! BOO!

    How about creating the parts you assemble, instead of welding lawnmower pistons into a cutesy horse sculpture? And describe the process????

    OR, on the flip side, enter an entire lathe as an art installation by itself, WITHOUT anything attached to it that detracts from the RAW, REAL history of industry. I’m talking real industry, NOT “industrial art”.

    Wheeeeeeeeeeeeeew. I had to let that out.

    If anyone wants, I can post a pic or two of my dorky art with an explanation of what I’m trying to convey. Not for attention! Only to explain what I try to preach, or why I find beauty/form in functional stuff. BY ITSSELF.

  13. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Utah
    Posts
    928
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1991
    Likes (Received)
    360

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Trboatworks View Post
    I suppose my shop is a art gallery now...

    Britain's Industrial History Reimagined for the Tate Commission

    Invalid URL
    Part of my ideology actually says, in a way, your shop probably is an art gallery! An area where creation happens. And obviously more legitimate than this hipster installation.

    For me, 99% of the time when I see another’s machine shop it invokes the same spark of creative excitement and visual beauty that beautiful paintings provide. The process room, the creation room!

  14. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Posts
    18,805
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    14320
    Likes (Received)
    14364

    Default

    Domething or nothing

    Usual pretentious twaddle, but as to the machines, from the top.


    1, Ward capstan (turret to you) lathe (with quick action collet chuck) hope what's standing on is a lot sturdier than it looks,

    2, The only one I can ID is (I think) a Binks Bullows compressor back left - and of course the digger (backhoe) bucket - the red paint saying probably early JCB.

    3, No idea what the extreme left m/c is, but I'm pretty sure the cement mixer is an early (just pre or post WWII) Winget (who FWIW were based at Rochester in Kent ..................and a very young and green Sami made parts for at one of Wingets supppliers / subbys)


    4, Is a Gardner diesel engine, …..(if it isn't then I'd damn well like to know what it is!)

    5, I'm pretty sure is a Lely Vicon ''Acrobat'' hay turner

    6, I'm pretty sure is a ''Rapidor'' hacksaw, possibly their ''Manchester''model, ………...good tool in it's day, mine was donkeys when I got it and it went on to cut up many many tons.

  15. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Country
    SPAIN
    Posts
    3,409
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1903
    Likes (Received)
    1242

    Default

    I hate shit like this.
    It's like Tracey Emins bed when she won the Turner prize and Damian Hurst sticking a cow in a tank of resin.
    I remember seeing Dalis museum in Figures Spain - there were some fine art black/white pencil drawings winding up the stairs - I'm sure they weren't his drawings - but they were absolutely fantastic.
    I know art is a definition, but arty farty can KMA!

  16. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Posts
    18,805
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    14320
    Likes (Received)
    14364

    Default

    Go on - blame THATon the EU as well.

  17. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Country
    SPAIN
    Posts
    3,409
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1903
    Likes (Received)
    1242

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Go on - blame THATon the EU as well.
    Ha!
    You farmers need culture!
    Which is specifically why the EU has funded the Brussels Broadcasting Corporation to the tune of 5mill over the last 4 years.
    I do think that the one-sided news dept has absorbed all of that though...

  18. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Country
    SPAIN
    Posts
    3,409
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1903
    Likes (Received)
    1242

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheOldCar View Post
    S E L F C O N T R O L

    Deep breaths, deep breaths....

    This is a personally sensitive issue to me, as I do the art thang.

    I have issue with “found art”. BIGTIME.

    These installations shown above at least have form and relatively minimum mods; I’m not saying I dislike them. My problem is with the found art fad infecting legitimate fine art shows and museums.

    You know the yard art trinkets for sale in West Yellowstone? A bison made of bike chains? Exhaust pipes booger-welded and Rustoleum rattle-canned into a green frog sculpture?

    And don’t get me started on pistons, camshafts and gears welded into anything from a desktop motorcycle toy to an animal...

    This, coupled with “steampunk” has been “trending now” (HATE that term) for too long; the fact that it gets in to fine art shows literally leaves me enraged.

    DEEEEEEEP BREATHS.

    Yes, art is subjective. I just don’t understand why found art can bypass all quality and legitimacy rules that bronze sculpting, oil painting, etc, must meet.

    I believe in what I call Process Art (I hope everyone is clapping for me, as I came up with that on my own ). That is (my) style of celebrating/joining the precision and beauty of machined, formed, punched, pressed, hammered and filed materials with form and beauty.
    Booger welds don’t fit here. Flap-disc grinder swirls with a cheap overdose of clearcoat don’t fit here (HOLY CRAP, every other lazer cut crapola sign has that finish here in Utah. How long did it take, 15 minutes?!?!?!??).
    Rustic is everywhere! BOO!

    How about creating the parts you assemble, instead of welding lawnmower pistons into a cutesy horse sculpture? And describe the process????

    OR, on the flip side, enter an entire lathe as an art installation by itself, WITHOUT anything attached to it that detracts from the RAW, REAL history of industry. I’m talking real industry, NOT “industrial art”.

    Wheeeeeeeeeeeeeew. I had to let that out.

    If anyone wants, I can post a pic or two of my dorky art with an explanation of what I’m trying to convey. Not for attention! Only to explain what I try to preach, or why I find beauty/form in functional stuff. BY ITSSELF.
    Go on
    Please post.

    BTW - I do like some of this stuff...Beauty is in the eye of the beholder
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails capture.jpg  

  19. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Posts
    18,805
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    14320
    Likes (Received)
    14364

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by barbter View Post
    Ha!
    You farmers need culture!
    We have that aplenty, ;- bothhorti & agriculture

  20. Likes Mud, barbter liked this post
  21. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    4,782
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3222
    Likes (Received)
    3628

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheOldCar View Post
    S

    Yes, art is subjective. I just don’t understand why found art can bypass all quality and legitimacy rules that bronze sculpting, oil painting, etc, must meet.
    This. I have a fairly restricted view of what is art. i'd add movies and TV to the bogus list, that's not art, its an entertainment product. Music, some. What many would call classical (more correctly called art music as classical is just one era) I think of as art. Drake or the latest pop craze, nope, not art. More packaged entertainment product, which is ok if you like it, but popularity doesn't make it art and I don't consider them artists. Maybe that's that jist of it, where the line is drawn is personal and some get so self absorbed with they lose the sense of there even being a line, or simply think its this side of it if some expert says so. When it comes to say the Tate Modern, someone needs to point out the Emperor has no clothes.

    Nothing I do in my shop is art. Lots is original and lots done with a lot of care, but its technique, skills and process not art. otoh, it it doesn't have to be art to be pleasing to the eye, a beautiful woman, my schaublin, a model engine I made or a Muskoka lake vista....all great to look at, but not art.

    If anyone wants, I can post a pic or two of my dorky art with an explanation of what I’m trying to convey. Not for attention! Only to explain what I try to preach, or why I find beauty/form in functional stuff. BY ITSSELF.
    yes please

  22. Likes TheOldCar, barbter, M.B. Naegle liked this post
  23. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Utah
    Posts
    928
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1991
    Likes (Received)
    360

    Default

    [IMG]art1 by crh2765, on Flickr[/IMG]

    [IMG]arty2 by crh2765, on Flickr[/IMG]


    One of my cheesy, opinionated descriptions below:

    An exercise in forming raw materials that pays respect to the steps used. I hope to display a sharp contrast to found art, yet also diminish terms like "craft". “Craft” in my mind seems to cheapen many methods used to create. Bump, bend, file, quench, harden, press, thread, heat, blue, coat and stretch. Draw, temper, relieve, brake, bore, turn, ream. Precision as a form of art done by careful connection of the mind, eye and hand.

    The many methods of process bring to mind my belief that there is virtually no difference between manual labor and fine art.

    The experience planting a London Plane tree or not using too much Prussian blue; whether making tooling and dies, figure drawing, or finish painting an entire automobile, I consider all of them absolute examples of fine art.

    Each involve multiple processes of organizing matter, which each both require and produce sound, smell, touch and visual joy. I very much enjoy process, like that visual lure I find when I see an unfinished painting.

    Materials formed:
    Steel, brass & copper bar stock (round, square and rectangular) as well as rebar & walnut hardwood.



    [IMG]IMG_8686 by crh2765, on Flickr[/IMG]


    [IMG]IMG_8681 by crh2765, on Flickr[/IMG]

  24. Likes Mud, M.B. Naegle, Ray Behner liked this post
  25. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Utah
    Posts
    928
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1991
    Likes (Received)
    360

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    This. I have a fairly restricted view of what is art. i'd add movies and TV to the bogus list, that's not art, its an entertainment product. Music, some. What many would call classical (more correctly called art music as classical is just one era) I think of as art. Drake or the latest pop craze, nope, not art. More packaged entertainment product, which is ok if you like it, but popularity doesn't make it art and I don't consider them artists. Maybe that's that jist of it, where the line is drawn is personal and some get so self absorbed with they lose the sense of there even being a line, or simply think its this side of it if some expert says so. When it comes to say the Tate Modern, someone needs to point out the Emperor has no clothes.

    Nothing I do in my shop is art. Lots is original and lots done with a lot of care, but its technique, skills and process not art. otoh, it it doesn't have to be art to be pleasing to the eye, a beautiful woman, my schaublin, a model engine I made or a Muskoka lake vista....all great to look at, but not art.
    CRAP, don't make me question my still-infantile art beliefs! I thought I lived the higher, purist laws...and here you are making some valid points, causing me to question!

  26. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Tennessee
    Posts
    467
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    145
    Likes (Received)
    121

    Default

    I spent a little time in the fine art world (museum level) and making the stuff. Found object art can be really good, so rare it is we tend to lump it all together as trash (like Xerox art). The spoon art car and the orange rooster behind the cubala at metal museum are my favorites. the rooster makes me smile, and I do not see the various tractor parts, I see fun in art (piece) and skill (craft) in the respect for materials, the execution, the proportions, and all that. The spoon art car does not look like a gazillion spoons as much as a cross between fish scales and pinecone texture - a smoothness from texture, like engine turn for machinist people. Un refined found object art is garbage, good scrap value maybe.
    Sadly I see less of this and more of the plasma art - which is a tier (or three) lower on the laziness and skill level. Sometimes it even has grinder texture for added gringe, not even smooth even sexy motion , that bouncy scooby doo back and forth ish.
    The sad part is not just the look, industry follows art, always has - it is the social responsibility of the craft artist to push the envelope of material - and as the artist gets lazy industry does too.
    Performance art (music, tv, plays, dance...) is supposed to be entertainment. If you get entertainment out of it, it has succeeded as a piece of art.

  27. Likes TheOldCar, barbter liked this post
  28. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    50
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    20
    Likes (Received)
    18

    Default

    See, but in the examples given, you have actually recombined various items to make new and interesting creations of your own design. Even if it is just meant for whimsy, you have directly altered something to display your vision to others. As far as I can tell, the schmuck featured at Tate has just taken items and put them on platforms. He has not put any labor into creating something new and unique.

    What would have been awesome would have been taking the machines unaltered, and making sculptures of stylized/interpreted people toiling away at the machines and implements. I think that would have had great impact.

    As an aside, I do think that the industrial design incorporated into older machine tools and logos is pretty awesome. I would love to see some of that art deco through mid-century modern aesthetics brought forward into modern machines.

  29. Likes TheOldCar, M.B. Naegle, memphisjed liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •