Machinist wages and living standard - Page 38
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 38 of 38 FirstFirst ... 28363738
Results 741 to 753 of 753
  1. #741
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    3,767
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    16
    Likes (Received)
    1802

    Default

    The shop I'm working in now dosent pay any machinist less than $30, most are close to $35. They work a 12hr shift, and the machinists work for 19 days straight then they get 2 days off.

    80.5 hours a week is the norm, 5am to 5pm.

    But this outfit is far from average in many ways

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk

  2. Likes michiganbuck liked this post
  3. #742
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    35
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    17
    Likes (Received)
    6

    Default

    A lot of this is depending upon location. In our area cost of living is low so the wages generally reflect this. A nice 2000 sq ft house in the suburbs will cost you around $150k on a half acre. Folks in our area with an M.B.A. generally make 45k to 80k. Engineers start around 50k and go up. Machinist start around $10/hr with no experience in our area. 5 yr guys are $12 to $18 generally.

  4. Likes michiganbuck liked this post
  5. #743
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    ga,usa
    Posts
    147
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    116
    Likes (Received)
    48

    Default

    Wal-mart pays $11.50/hr to pack shelves - no apprenticeship needed. Food and vehicles do not cost any less in the rural South than they do in the North.

  6. Likes tdmidget liked this post
  7. #744
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    6,174
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    8758
    Likes (Received)
    2853

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    Old farts like me don't command high pay because a lot of retired guys are out knocking on doors just for something to do..
    So likely I would not get anything near what I would produce...likely 12 to 20 on a good day for running manual or CNC tool, surface or OD grinders, or lathes. Yes I could get a tool engineer or tool trouble job for more but those jobs are hard to find at my age.

    Many shops pay more for a young but experienced guy because they want to keep them for years and not have them walk for a dollar or two.

    We pay a retired guy $10.00 and a young guy $20. at the deer blind shop..for cutting plywood to +- 1/16, drilling hand-drill holes, light assembly and brush or spray painting...I work there part time for free because I don't need money and it's family.
    Isn't that sweet? You pay 50% less for 45 years experience? I think we have found at least part of the problem. AND you are so blatant that you post it on the internet. Fuck the young 'uns, fuck the old 'uns.
    I

  8. #745
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    9,434
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2837
    Likes (Received)
    3150

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post
    Isn't that sweet? You pay 50% less for 45 years experience? I think we have found at least part of the problem. AND you are so blatant that you post it on the internet. Fuck the young 'uns, fuck the old 'uns.
    I
    Td read the whole post...I would expect $12 to $20 on a good day for high skill work that should pay $25 to $35..that is what retired guys might get, lower than the shop rate....
    Up to 4 or 5 years an apprentice is learning a trade often getting instruction, not just taking the print and running the part..all that seems logical to me.

    The deer blind shop is not my company but my son in laws..
    The deer blind work is low-skill not machinist work. Most work that can be done the first day by just about anybody often pays low..That is not my doing but just that facts of life.

  9. #746
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    ga,usa
    Posts
    147
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    116
    Likes (Received)
    48

    Default

    Here is a sample of a trade test(pg 28) for a Royal Navy fitter and turner. Lathe, shaper and hand tools only in 95 hours. It is from the 40's but I am sure apart from the numbers of apprentices, the RN still uses similar methods and standards. I am sure Gordon could confirm it.
    This is the link to the whole book. http://www.hnsa.org/wp-content/uploa.../07/engmag.pdf
    And skills like this are worth $15/hr? Is it any wonder no one is too keen.
    rn-test.jpg

  10. #747
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Country
    DENMARK
    Posts
    18,594
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3775
    Likes (Received)
    15455

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gwelo62 View Post
    Here is a sample of a trade test(pg 28) for a Royal Navy fitter and turner. Lathe, shaper and hand tools only in 95 hours. It is from the 40's but I am sure apart from the numbers of apprentices, the RN still uses similar methods and standards. I am sure Gordon could confirm it.
    This is the link to the whole book. http://www.hnsa.org/wp-content/uploa.../07/engmag.pdf
    And skills like this are worth $15/hr? Is it any wonder no one is too keen.
    rn-test.jpg
    As you are asking something relevant to the OP I will answer as best I can and from own experience.

    To become a machinist in Scotland (probably very similar in the other UK countries although each country does have slight variations) back in the late 50ties and early 60ties not only did you have to serve a 5 year apprenticeship but also join a union. AEU.
    Where I served my apprenticeship was at John Lang & Sons, Lathe Manufacturers, and they were regarded as one of the best 5 places in Scotland for an apprenticeship. Rolls Royce in Glasgow was another. To be accepted at Langs as an apprentice required you pass an IQ test.

    We worked a 4 day week in the factory and 1 day a week at college. The day at college was paid at a rate of 10% more than normal wages. The catch was that if you failed an exam you had to repeat the year at night school and work a 5 day week in the factory. There was much more to that apprenticeship than “just” learning how to operate machines. There was also an Apprentice Supervisor and a foreman just for the apprentices.

    When I moved to Denmark at the ripe old age of 22, as a 5th year apprentice in Scotland (with bonuses etc.) I was making around £35 a week and that was for a 4 day week, and made almost twice as much as a Danish machinist. That’s changed!

    Someone can do the maths to figure out how much £35 a week in 1963 would be worth today. Back then it was not bad for what was basically a 4 day week.

    Several of my friends like me, used that education to move higher up on the ladder. 2 joined the merchant navy as officers and one who I met a couple of years ago had become a high paid consultant. I’ve done OK too.

    I’m sure that those of you that have worked with European machinists know that the vast majority “knew their stuff”. The notion that someone “off the street” in the USA can be hired as a machinist is to me almost unbelievable.

    Better add that I only worked as a machinist in Denmark (learning the language etc.) for 2 years before becoming a "white collar" worker. QC manager. When I started my own place 25 years ago I could still work most machines but after a few years then that stopped being necessary. Some things are never forgotten.

  11. #748
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    12,687
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    As you are asking something relevant to the OP I will answer as best I can and from own experience.
    Some things are never forgotten.
    Damm....O.K. Who had 9 days and 6 hours 39 minutes ?

  12. Likes converterking, camscan liked this post
  13. #749
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Flushing/Flint, Michigan
    Posts
    6,957
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    315
    Likes (Received)
    5672

    Default

    It isn't just machinist that have taken a beating it the whole business of making chips.
    If life was fair and you go from any shop owner in Michigan with 3-5 guys in the 80's to now.... said owner should now be making $300K.
    I don't think that is happening on a wide scale.

    A $25 per hour guy with decent benefits runs at about a $45 per hour billable cost with all said and done.
    Add in 5 for tooling, another 7 for machine payments, and 3 for HLP and building. Then at 60 dollars per hour you are making no money at all and wonder why you bother.

    One can scream all day that it is not right and should pay more but it is the reality of today's world in manufacturing in the US.
    We ruled this once and perhaps did not realize how good we had it.
    Now the rest of globe comes in and the rising tide there means our water level sinks.

    I saw the assault of southern states here on work and pay rates. Then overseas.
    Should I hate the guy in China or India more that the guy in Georgia or Tennessee? (Those states have actually hit me harder than the far east.)
    I think I should not hate anyone as all are trying to live better.

    What does raise some ire is those who worked in the 70's, 80's, 90's in machining in the US and do not realize what a golden opportunity and easy life they had.
    Bob

  14. Likes Greg White liked this post
  15. #750
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Milwaukee,WI
    Posts
    1,113
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9974
    Likes (Received)
    802

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    What does raise some ire is those who worked in the 70's, 80's, 90's in machining in the US and do not realize what a golden opportunity and easy life they had.
    Bob
    It sure paid a lot better but the work today is easier.

  16. #751
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    5,061
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2973
    Likes (Received)
    3313

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    As you are asking something relevant to the OP I will answer as best I can and from own experience.
    what are you doing here? Gave up on yourself so soon? I thought you'd at least make it a month

  17. Likes camscan liked this post
  18. #752
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    9,434
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2837
    Likes (Received)
    3150

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gwelo62 View Post
    Here is a sample of a trade test(pg 28) for a Royal Navy fitter and turner. Lathe, shaper and hand tools only in 95 hours. It is from the 40's but I am sure apart from the numbers of apprentices, the RN still uses similar methods and standards. I am sure Gordon could confirm it.
    This is the link to the whole book. http://www.hnsa.org/wp-content/uploa.../07/engmag.pdf
    And skills like this are worth $15/hr? Is it any wonder no one is too keen.
    rn-test.jpg
    Imagine a ship's machinist has to choose material, bronze, brass, steels, plastic, aluminum, Back engineer or re engineer the part, process the manufacture , heat treat if needed..and do all that ASAP... very high talent..

  19. Likes gwelo62 liked this post
  20. #753
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    ga,usa
    Posts
    147
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    116
    Likes (Received)
    48

    Default

    Add the pressure of a U-boat or two in the area while you are wallowing in the water to motivate you.
    Suddenly the man who can make the engine work is a whole lot more important than the person getting a high score on Candy Crush!
    I just re-read "The Cruel Sea" by Nicholas Monsarratt. Well worth reading. It is about the Atlantic convoys.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
2