Manufacturing in a Gig Economy - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    I did know a couple of guys made a lot of money out of simple crappy furniture....the first couple of samples they stole from a market....using these as models,they sold franchises to make them ,with a purchase guarantee....then they sold distributor territories ,and state territories ......beginning to sound like a pyramid scheme?.....Anyhoo,these guys needed a workshop to look legit,and a few tools etc....they approached me ,cause I had a big empty shed.......pair of two bit cons ,but I went along ,provided I was the banker....sold dozens of franchises ,made a lot of cash..(back in the 80s)....funny thing was no one got angry when it fell over ,the cons took off,and that was it.I was left with a shedfull of crappy furniture......which I gave to a charity.....

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  3. #42
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    So, if I understand correctly...

    Convince people to not account for their own overhead costs
    Flout/ignore environmental regulations around finishing
    Provide a terrible quality product
    *techy hand-wave*

    All you need to do is raise and then lose billions of dollars, and this sounds like a thriving gig economy business to me. Call it something like Tablr.

    Seriously, though. If you're making low quality product by hand with minimal tools, you're competing directly with Vietnam. China's too expensive now.

    If you're making low quality product efficiently with a lot of automation, you're competing directly with Ikea.

    The only reason this looks remotely like a business model to you or your gig economy marks is that they've never manufactured a commodity product that's sold retail. If the manufacturer gets 25% of the retail price, gross, not net, they're doing well. A standard retail markup is 100%. Furniture stores, closer to 200% list to cover the perpetual sales. The distributor will want 20 points at least, shipping is expensive, damaged goods are common and shipping is depressing.

    A sufficiently automated and efficient furniture factory can bang out a finished end table in ten man minutes, easy. But it's a million dollars investment to get there.

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  5. #43
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    This old idea doesn't work in a modern economy.

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    In this country multiple forces including Taxation are closing in on the gig economy......catch with all this ,if if you re found in court to be an employer ,they you are responsible for all the back pay,taxes,penalties ,and jail time attached to your enterprise.

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    So how is a gig economy different from job shop work?

    Tom

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    Quote Originally Posted by TDegenhart View Post
    So how is a gig economy different from job shop work?

    Tom
    The same way that John's cab company is different from Uber.

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    "and shipping is depressing." (snipped from Comatose's reply)

    I couldn't agree more! Something you just have to experience for years to really understand and appreciate.

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    As far as I can tell,the media definition of gig economy is a kid delivering something on a bicycle...........but there is nothing new about whats now called a gig.........two hundred years ago people used to make cyanide and phosphorous in their houses ,and supply to a buyer,who was then able to supply such as metal hardeners and matchmakers in quantity....if one maker dropped out through ill health,others were still producing.....I remember as a kid people used to rewind starter motors and generators in their houses on piece rates.......no mention of gig........in fact the first use of gig I ever heard was applied to professional women.....the oldest profession......Q.....if thats the oldest profession ,whats the second oldest?..A.pox doctor.

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    Critical difference in the 'gig economy' is the ease of finding work, allowing people to turn gigs into a a 'full time job'. Generally with low pay, no benefits, no skill development, and no hope for advancement.

    IMO the whole thing is backwards from the way that automation should be used to make good jobs, especially in manufacturing. Use the automation, on both the software (design, CAM, etc.) and machines, to vertically integrate the business further. The opposite of the gig economy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    ....if thats the oldest profession ,whats the second oldest?..
    Lawyer. .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    Lawyer. .
    Hard to tell the difference in a lot of cases.

    PDW

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    One big problem with the Gig economy is that there is no legal protection for the consumer or the worker. If your Uber driver rapes you it is not the companies fault they do not do background checks. Maybe there is a reason that Taxi drivers have to pass background checks.
    If you die in a house fire while staying in a unsafe B&B their homeowners insurance will deny the claim since it is home owners insurance not hotel owner insurance. Simple things like doors opening out and lighted exit signs are required in hotels because lack of those has caused deaths in the past.
    If your air bag breaks and blinds you when it deploys it is not the makers fault. it was made by self employed workers who are responsible. They just happen to work in the same factory and all have exactly the same work hours but they are self employed because the company says so.

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  17. #53
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    You re catching on Bill.....now reduce your prices some ,and welcome to the gig economy.

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    The first profession in the Bible is lawyer. From the chaos God created the heavens and the earth. Who created the chaos..lawyers.
    Bill D

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    Craziest gig I ever heard of.....people bought franchises to make plastic bags....the kind you get free at the supermarket .....and compete against machines in China....and borrowed the money to buy the franchises.Sad ,really.


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