New electric motor design for EV's
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  1. #1
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    Default New electric motor design for EV's

    I came across this during a search for something else on the net. It claims to be the best innovation in electric motors in 100 years.
    Glad to see it is developed domestically (Texas).

    Why Our Motor - Linear Labs

    News - Linear Labs

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    Interesting. I wonder when we will see them in use or for sale?

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    Hybrid Stepper!

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    Lots about finance......buuut....if they sold out to IBM in 2014 for $130m,why do they want to be screwed by vulture,sorry venture capitalists for a paltry $4.5m ?

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    As Cal says, they apparently have achieved higher torque by having a lot of steps. You could do something similar with a more standard DC motor armature with a lot of coils and many brushes along with a lot of matching field poles. Besides the lower speed requiring less gearing, there is some efficiency to be gained in the heat generated in the coils. The watts generated is voltage X current. If you double the voltage on a coil, the current also doubles, generating twice the heat. By energizing the coils more often at a lower current, the efficiency would improve. The information is so sketchy as to be almost worthless, but it appears that field weakening is accomplished by modifying the magnetic path, also a useful technique. There isn't enough information on the site to justify the claims.

    Another revolutionary idea that may appear on the cover of Popular Science and never be heard from again.

    Bill

    They have bunch of patents

    Google Patents

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    Looks like the real novelty is that of putting a PM rotor on the inside and outside of the stationary tubular stator. As stated there is very little technical detail on the website . . . thanks for the link to the patents. My sense is that an inverter drive with multiple output stages could commutate the stator coils individually allowing tremendous torque with a smooth delivery. But it will require a lot of switching devices which come at a higher cost than a typical three phase inverter output.

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    You would be energizing sets of coils. I don't see where it would take more than four or five, depending on how much you wanted to divide them up.

    Bill


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