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  1. #1021
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Why is Michigan so bad in these measurements?
    Fairly strict social rules in place where you were not even allowed to visit the neighbor unless "essential".
    All that seemed like a good idea to me but the numbers don't bear out it working.

    The shutdown did bring out the loonies who thought carrying rifles into the state government buildings a good idea.
    Maybe not the best plan if one wants to keep open gun rights.

    Why did the shutdown and curfews in Michigan not put us in the lowest percentages? Were we just doomed to be the worst or does this plan not work as well as expected?
    Yes the number on the bottom matters and I see doubt that it would be way different on CFR with more testing but don't all states have the same testing problem?

    True we have southeast Michigan and Detroit but other states have big cities too.
    One can and will never know if what was done here worked, made no difference or did long term damage.
    Logical to follow the advice of doctors and such in these times but the results confusing.
    One wonders if the "science advice" is in fact science or a bias in thinking.

    Do not get me wrong, I believed, would scold others that did not want to get in line to protect us all.
    It is the "proof in the pudding" that now bothers me.
    For most that I know this shutdown has become a "financial windfall" but who pays that piper.
    Bob
    Bob, I can't answer the why- 80% of Michigan's cases are in the Detroit metro, and that is a pretty depressed area economically. That might play into it.

    Agree that the militia types should not be packing at the capital. It's a stupid time to be "making the point" wrt the 2A.

    Don't read too much into the numbers at this point, though. We are still in the middle of this thing.

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    Our troubles are small.

    New Video : Disasters Slated For 2020 | Real Climate Science

    What a ride! The END is Nigh

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    ...People tend to assume a high number of deaths means neglect but actually some of the classier places have more deaths because wealthier people usually don't enter a nursing home until they have exhausted all other options which means they are often sicker at time of admission and die within a shorter time.
    Call me skeptical on this one. Wealthy people do not really end up in nursing homes. They have better options like just hiring a live-in nurse.

    Statistically speaking, the nursing home community is a medicaid community.

    If these "classier places" even exist, I'd be willing to wager they are not the sites of the big outbreaks...

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    Quote Originally Posted by jancollc View Post
    . . . If these "classier places" even exist, I'd be willing to wager they are not the sites of the big outbreaks...
    Not especially classy - but we have an assisted living place in our community. Monthly rents for a one or two bedroom place are in the $2500-4000 range - with a central dining area or meals delivered. Residents basically cashed out their homes for a place where they can have an apartment, meals and some healthcare available. The affiliated hospital is half a block down the road. Place is full of seniors walking, shuffling, or wheel chairing along. Tons of activities and comradeship apparently. And a staff that's been very good at isolating the residents from coronavirus.

    I'd think you're right about the wealthy. And even the not-quite-wealthy. Around here, most people who owned a home and sold it likely has enough money to afford 10-20 years at a place like this. Residents here tend to be middle class professionals - ex teachers, librarians, small business owners, and the like

    Then, there are the nursing homes and homeless shelters . . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by CalG View Post
    Our troubles are small.

    New Video : Disasters Slated For 2020 | Real Climate Science

    What a ride! The END is Nigh
    Thank god for that.

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    [QUOTE=Scottl;3557325
    But vaccines are harmless, right? Read through this document and it's not quite that simple.
    [/QUOTE]

    OMG then don't get vaccinated. Say for shingles. Because you HAD chicken pox and it was just 'no big deal'
    right, Scotto?

    Whatever ya do, scotto, don' look up shingles. Or,opthalmic aka ocular shingles. Same virus. No big deal eh.

    Shingles on Forehead and in the Eye

    Same virus is in you right now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    OMG then don't get vaccinated. Say for shingles. Because you HAD chicken pox and it was just 'no big deal'
    right, Scotto?

    Whatever ya do, scotto, don' look up shingles. Or,opthalmic aka ocular shingles. Same virus. No big deal eh.

    Shingles on Forehead and in the Eye

    Same virus is in you right now.
    Except in his case, it's inside the forehead and reproducing nicely rather than outside on the skin...

    PDW

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    Quote Originally Posted by PDW View Post
    Except in his case, it's inside the forehead and reproducing nicely rather than outside on the skin...

    PDW
    Not entirely a new phenomenon, is it?

    Wise wimmin'... claim the hair grows fastest... on BALD HEADED men.

    Figure the hair simply reverses direction, grows inward.. 'til it has displaced the last remains of the "big head" brain.. and reappears ... leaking out nose and ears.

    Dunno if there's truth in it... or was never, but...

    Does seem to get harder and harder to FAULT a "wise woman" as I get balder...

    Go figure..

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    The Mask of the Red Death

    New study questions the effectiveness of masks against SARS-CoV-2

    E.A. Poe would approve...

    Sinister causes

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    I did not go back and read all the posts so I hope this is not a repost. Based on this guys information The current covid death count of about 100,000 should be reported as roughly one million by CDC reckoning. So much higher then the calculated flue deaths.
    Bill D

    Comparing COVID-19 Deaths to Flu Deaths Is like Comparing Apples to Oranges - Scientific American Blog Network

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    Bill and all

    A quick read of a biased opinion piece... There is so much wrong....
    The piece is saying "The POTUS establishes the numbers and then directs the CDC to publish them"
    With that as the premise, what could be expected that would benefit truth?

    80K people die of Diabetes every year. When did your last friend pass from that disease (apology if that reality has happened to you)
    Myself? I've not even heard of anyone in my community dying, though many suffer.

    It's getting to look like the Wuhan pneumonia data is so full of holes it will never hold water.

    But I read that both Spain and Italy are sick and tired of the entire matter, and have stopped worrying about or giving it press time...

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    Quote Originally Posted by CalG View Post
    Bill and all

    A quick read of a biased opinion piece... There is so much wrong....
    The piece is saying "The POTUS establishes the numbers and then directs the CDC to publish them"...
    Cal, you might want to take another, longer, read of the Scientific American opinion piece.

    It does not say the POTUS establishes the numbers; only that he (like most everyone else) repeats them. And the author, who is a medical doctor, is questioning those numbers. Starting with the basic observation that he and his colleagues rarely see anyone actually die of the flu -- and wondered where those CDC numbers came from. Here's what he found.

    The CDC has long taken the actual number of flu deaths (and those apparently also include pneumonia deaths) and multiples them by an arcane fudge factor to come up with a guesstimated number of flu deaths per year:

    "In the last six flu seasons, the CDC’s reported number of actual confirmed flu deaths—that is, counting flu deaths the way we are currently counting deaths from the coronavirus—has ranged from 3,448 to 15,620, which far lower than the numbers commonly repeated by public officials . . ."

    It said that actual recorded deaths (and apparently including pneumonia) of 3,000 to 15,000 or so per year end up being reported as a guesstimated 6 or so times higher each year -- and also suggests even the "actuals" may be high (the doctors rarely recall anyone dying from influenza, but many from pneumonia):

    ". . .CDC’s assumption that the number of people who die of flu each year is on average six times greater than the number of flu deaths that are actually confirmed. In fact, in the fine print, the CDC’s flu numbers also include pneumonia deaths."

    I don't know precisely how CDC factors pneumonia deaths in -- and the author didn't say -- but that disease is caused by a wide variety of bacterial, fungal, and viral infectons - not just the seasonal flu.

    This is why the "excess mortality" is likely a useful number to put things in perspective (minus clear things like vehicular deaths). We count actual deaths pretty well.

    What would be interesting to know is a bit more on how these CDC guesstimates are established.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteM View Post
    Cal, you might want to take another, longer, read of the Scientific American opinion piece.

    It does not say the POTUS establishes the numbers; only that he (like most everyone else) repeats them. And the author, who is a medical doctor, is questioning those numbers. Starting with the basic observation that he and his colleagues rarely see anyone actually die of the flu -- and wondered where those CDC numbers came from. Here's what he found.

    The CDC has long taken the actual number of flu deaths (and those apparently also include pneumonia deaths) and multiples them by an arcane fudge factor to come up with a guesstimated number of flu deaths per year:

    "In the last six flu seasons, the CDC’s reported number of actual confirmed flu deaths—that is, counting flu deaths the way we are currently counting deaths from the coronavirus—has ranged from 3,448 to 15,620, which far lower than the numbers commonly repeated by public officials . . ."

    It said that actual recorded deaths (and apparently including pneumonia) of 3,000 to 15,000 or so per year end up being reported as a guesstimated 6 or so times higher each year -- and also suggests even the "actuals" may be high (the doctors rarely recall anyone dying from influenza, but many from pneumonia):

    ". . .CDC’s assumption that the number of people who die of flu each year is on average six times greater than the number of flu deaths that are actually confirmed. In fact, in the fine print, the CDC’s flu numbers also include pneumonia deaths."

    I don't know precisely how CDC factors pneumonia deaths in -- and the author didn't say -- but that disease is caused by a wide variety of bacterial, fungal, and viral infectons - not just the seasonal flu.

    This is why the "excess mortality" is likely a useful number to put things in perspective (minus clear things like vehicular deaths). We count actual deaths pretty well.

    What would be interesting to know is a bit more on how these CDC guesstimates are established.
    Right.

    I&P

    Just as it should be with this seasonal flu epidemic.

    Except the "official count" is NOT breaking out the P in any way, thus making the I portion more dramatic.

    The CDC revises past years stats to reflect information as it is made available.

    But take a look at the numbers. Indeed, there are 20 K years, and there are 80 k and even 100K plus years in out recent past.

    Suddenly, this year, all the previous numbers are wrong? I don't think so. Just a new motive for whatever is being portrayed.

    Still, The difference between 60K-80k "bad season" and 100K isn't a significant portion of 3,000,000 overall.

    I'm happy to see all the numbers declining.

    Shame on those folks in Minnesota for not social distancing. They should be ashamed for endangering others.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jancollc View Post
    Call me skeptical on this one. Wealthy people do not really end up in nursing homes. They have better options like just hiring a live-in nurse.

    Statistically speaking, the nursing home community is a medicaid community.

    If these "classier places" even exist, I'd be willing to wager they are not the sites of the big outbreaks...
    I believe I said "wealthier" people, not wealthy people. In one case they have the resources for at-home help until they become too sick to live in their homes. At that point they are probably closer to death when admitted which would explain why studies have found that more affluent people tend to die sooner after admission.

    And I agree that the better places are not the site of these outbreaks because they tend to have private rooms rather than shared or even dormitories. We already know that the highest tolls have been among people in high density living situations.

    The major point many keep trying to ignore is that in many places 50-70 percent of the Covid deaths reported were from nursing homes which means the general population is at far lower risk than previously assumed.

    PS: I recently learned of an older person who "caught the virus" while being treated for something else at the hospital. When I asked more questions it turns out the person does not yet have any symptoms but "tested positive" and was quarantined. As I asked before "how many of the 'cases' actually became sick?".

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    FINTAN O’TOOLE. Donald Trump has destroyed the country he promised to make great again

    (Irish Times 25.4.2020)

    By FINTAN O'TOOLE | On 29 April 2020

    Usually, when this kind of outlandish idiocy is displaying itself, there is the comforting thought that, if things were really serious, it would all stop. People would sober up. Instead, a large part of the US has hit the bottle even harder.

    US President Donald Trump has claimed he was being sarcastic and testing the media when he raised the idea that injecting disinfectant or irradiating the body with ultraviolet light might kill coronavirus.

    Over more than two centuries, the United States has stirred a very wide range of feelings in the rest of the world: love and hatred, fear and hope, envy and contempt, awe and anger. But there is one emotion that has never been directed towards the US until now: pity.

    However bad things are for most other rich democracies, it is hard not to feel sorry for Americans. Most of them did not vote for Donald Trump in 2016. Yet they are locked down with a malignant narcissist who, instead of protecting his people from Covid-19, has amplified its lethality. The country Trump promised to make great again has never in its history seemed so pitiful.

    Will American prestige ever recover from this shameful episode? The US went into the coronavirus crisis with immense advantages: precious weeks of warning about what was coming, the world’s best concentration of medical and scientific expertise, effectively limitless financial resources, a military complex with stunning logistical capacity and most of the world’s leading technology corporations. Yet it managed to make itself the global epicentre of the pandemic.

    As the American writer George Packer puts it in the current edition of the Atlantic, “The United States reacted … like Pakistan or Belarus – like a country with shoddy infrastructure and a dysfunctional government whose leaders were too corrupt or stupid to head off mass suffering.”

    It is one thing to be powerless in the face of a natural disaster, quite another to watch vast power being squandered in real time – wilfully, malevolently, vindictively. It is one thing for governments to fail (as, in one degree or another, most governments did), quite another to watch a ruler and his supporters actively spread a deadly virus. Trump, his party and Rupert Murdoch’s Fox News became vectors of the pestilence.

    The grotesque spectacle of the president openly inciting people (some of them armed) to take to the streets to oppose the restrictions that save lives is the manifestation of a political death wish. What are supposed to be daily briefings on the crisis, demonstrative of national unity in the face of a shared challenge, have been used by Trump merely to sow confusion and division. They provide a recurring horror show in which all the neuroses that haunt the American subconscious dance naked on live TV.

    If the plague is a test, its ruling political nexus ensured that the US would fail it at a terrible cost in human lives. In the process, the idea of the US as the world’s leading nation – an idea that has shaped the past century – has all but evaporated.

    Other than the Trump impersonator Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil, who is now looking to the US as the exemplar of anything other than what not to do? How many people in Düsseldorf or Dublin are wishing they lived in Detroit or Dallas?

    It is hard to remember now but, even in 2017, when Trump took office, the conventional wisdom in the US was that the Republican Party and the broader framework of US political institutions would prevent him from doing too much damage. This was always a delusion, but the pandemic has exposed it in the most savage ways.

    What used to be called mainstream conservatism has not absorbed Trump – he has absorbed it. Almost the entire right-wing half of American politics has surrendered abjectly to him. It has sacrificed on the altar of wanton stupidity the most basic ideas of responsibility, care and even safety.

    Thus, even at the very end of March, 15 Republican governors had failed to order people to stay at home or to close non-essential businesses. In Alabama, for example, it was not until April 3rd that governor Kay Ivey finally issued a stay-at-home order.

    In Florida, the state with the highest concentration of elderly people with underlying conditions, governor Ron DeSantis, a Trump mini-me, kept the beach resorts open to students travelling from all over the US for spring break parties. Even on April 1st, when he issued restrictions, DeSantis exempted religious services and “recreational activities”.

    There is, as the demonstrations in US cities show, plenty of political mileage in denying the reality of the pandemic.

    Georgia governor Brian Kemp, when he finally issued a stay-at-home order on April 1st, explained: “We didn’t know that [the virus can be spread by people without symptoms] until the last 24 hours.”

    This is not mere ignorance – it is deliberate and homicidal stupidity. There is, as the demonstrations this week in US cities have shown, plenty of political mileage in denying the reality of the pandemic. It is fuelled by Fox News and far-right internet sites, and it reaps for these politicians millions of dollars in donations, mostly (in an ugly irony) from older people who are most vulnerable to the coronavirus.

    It draws on a concoction of conspiracy theories, hatred of science, paranoia about the “deep state” and religious providentialism (God will protect the good folks) that is now very deeply infused in the mindset of the American right.

    Trump embodies and enacts this mindset, but he did not invent it. The US response to the coronavirus crisis has been paralysed by a contradiction that the Republicans have inserted into the heart of US democracy. On the one hand, they want to control all the levers of governmental power. On the other they have created a popular base by playing on the notion that government is innately evil and must not be trusted.

    The contradiction was made manifest in two of Trump’s statements on the pandemic: on the one hand that he has “total authority”, and on the other that “I don’t take responsibility at all”. Caught between authoritarian and anarchic impulses, he is incapable of coherence.

    But this is not just Donald Trump. The crisis has shown definitively that Trump’s presidency is not an aberration. It has grown on soil long prepared to receive it. The monstrous blossoming of misrule has structure and purpose and strategy behind it.

    There are very powerful interests who demand “freedom” in order to do as they like with the environment, society and the economy. They have infused a very large part of American culture with the belief that “freedom” is literally more important than life. My freedom to own assault weapons trumps your right not to get shot at school. Now, my freedom to go to the barber (“I Need a Haircut” read one banner this week in St Paul, Minnesota) trumps your need to avoid infection.

    Usually, when this kind of outlandish idiocy is displaying itself, there is the comforting thought that, if things were really serious, it would all stop. People would sober up. Instead, a large part of the US has hit the bottle even harder.

    And the president, his party and their media allies keep supplying the drinks. There has been no moment of truth, no shock of realisation that the antics have to end. No one of any substance on the US right has stepped in to say: get a grip, people are dying here.

    If he is re-elected, toxicity will have become the lifeblood of American politics That is the mark of how deep the trouble is for the US – it is not just that Trump has treated the crisis merely as a way to feed tribal hatreds but that this behaviour has become normalised. When the freak show is live on TV every evening, and the star is boasting about his ratings, it is not really a freak show any more. For a very large and solid bloc of Americans, it is reality.

    And this will get worse before it gets better. Trump has at least eight more months in power. In his inaugural address in 2017, he evoked “American carnage” and promised to make it stop. But now that the real carnage has arrived, he is revelling in it. He is in his element.

    As things get worse, he will pump more hatred and falsehood, more death-wish defiance of reason and decency, into the groundwater. If a new administration succeeds him in 2021, it will have to clean up the toxic dump he leaves behind. If he is re-elected, toxicity will have become the lifeblood of American politics. Either way, it will be a long time before the rest of the world can imagine America being great again.

    Fintan O’Toole is an Irish columnist, literary editor, and drama critic for The Irish Times, for which he has written since 1988.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tim9lives View Post
    FINTAN O’TOOLE. Donald Trump has destroyed the country he promised to make great again

    (Irish Times 25.4.2020)

    By FINTAN O'TOOLE | On 29 April 2020

    Usually, when this kind of outlandish idiocy is displaying itself, there is the comforting thought that, if things were really serious, it would all stop. People would sober up. Instead, a large part of the US has hit the bottle even harder.

    US President Donald Trump has claimed he was being sarcastic and testing the media when he raised the idea that injecting disinfectant or irradiating the body with ultraviolet light might kill coronavirus.

    Over more than two centuries, the United States has stirred a very wide range of feelings in the rest of the world: love and hatred, fear and hope, envy and contempt, awe and anger. But there is one emotion that has never been directed towards the US until now: pity.

    However bad things are for most other rich democracies, it is hard not to feel sorry for Americans. Most of them did not vote for Donald Trump in 2016. Yet they are locked down with a malignant narcissist who, instead of protecting his people from Covid-19, has amplified its lethality. The country Trump promised to make great again has never in its history seemed so pitiful.

    Will American prestige ever recover from this shameful episode? The US went into the coronavirus crisis with immense advantages: precious weeks of warning about what was coming, the world’s best concentration of medical and scientific expertise, effectively limitless financial resources, a military complex with stunning logistical capacity and most of the world’s leading technology corporations. Yet it managed to make itself the global epicentre of the pandemic.

    As the American writer George Packer puts it in the current edition of the Atlantic, “The United States reacted … like Pakistan or Belarus – like a country with shoddy infrastructure and a dysfunctional government whose leaders were too corrupt or stupid to head off mass suffering.”

    It is one thing to be powerless in the face of a natural disaster, quite another to watch vast power being squandered in real time – wilfully, malevolently, vindictively. It is one thing for governments to fail (as, in one degree or another, most governments did), quite another to watch a ruler and his supporters actively spread a deadly virus. Trump, his party and Rupert Murdoch’s Fox News became vectors of the pestilence.

    The grotesque spectacle of the president openly inciting people (some of them armed) to take to the streets to oppose the restrictions that save lives is the manifestation of a political death wish. What are supposed to be daily briefings on the crisis, demonstrative of national unity in the face of a shared challenge, have been used by Trump merely to sow confusion and division. They provide a recurring horror show in which all the neuroses that haunt the American subconscious dance naked on live TV.

    If the plague is a test, its ruling political nexus ensured that the US would fail it at a terrible cost in human lives. In the process, the idea of the US as the world’s leading nation – an idea that has shaped the past century – has all but evaporated.

    Other than the Trump impersonator Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil, who is now looking to the US as the exemplar of anything other than what not to do? How many people in Düsseldorf or Dublin are wishing they lived in Detroit or Dallas?

    It is hard to remember now but, even in 2017, when Trump took office, the conventional wisdom in the US was that the Republican Party and the broader framework of US political institutions would prevent him from doing too much damage. This was always a delusion, but the pandemic has exposed it in the most savage ways.

    What used to be called mainstream conservatism has not absorbed Trump – he has absorbed it. Almost the entire right-wing half of American politics has surrendered abjectly to him. It has sacrificed on the altar of wanton stupidity the most basic ideas of responsibility, care and even safety.

    Thus, even at the very end of March, 15 Republican governors had failed to order people to stay at home or to close non-essential businesses. In Alabama, for example, it was not until April 3rd that governor Kay Ivey finally issued a stay-at-home order.

    In Florida, the state with the highest concentration of elderly people with underlying conditions, governor Ron DeSantis, a Trump mini-me, kept the beach resorts open to students travelling from all over the US for spring break parties. Even on April 1st, when he issued restrictions, DeSantis exempted religious services and “recreational activities”.

    There is, as the demonstrations in US cities show, plenty of political mileage in denying the reality of the pandemic.

    Georgia governor Brian Kemp, when he finally issued a stay-at-home order on April 1st, explained: “We didn’t know that [the virus can be spread by people without symptoms] until the last 24 hours.”

    This is not mere ignorance – it is deliberate and homicidal stupidity. There is, as the demonstrations this week in US cities have shown, plenty of political mileage in denying the reality of the pandemic. It is fuelled by Fox News and far-right internet sites, and it reaps for these politicians millions of dollars in donations, mostly (in an ugly irony) from older people who are most vulnerable to the coronavirus.

    It draws on a concoction of conspiracy theories, hatred of science, paranoia about the “deep state” and religious providentialism (God will protect the good folks) that is now very deeply infused in the mindset of the American right.

    Trump embodies and enacts this mindset, but he did not invent it. The US response to the coronavirus crisis has been paralysed by a contradiction that the Republicans have inserted into the heart of US democracy. On the one hand, they want to control all the levers of governmental power. On the other they have created a popular base by playing on the notion that government is innately evil and must not be trusted.

    The contradiction was made manifest in two of Trump’s statements on the pandemic: on the one hand that he has “total authority”, and on the other that “I don’t take responsibility at all”. Caught between authoritarian and anarchic impulses, he is incapable of coherence.

    But this is not just Donald Trump. The crisis has shown definitively that Trump’s presidency is not an aberration. It has grown on soil long prepared to receive it. The monstrous blossoming of misrule has structure and purpose and strategy behind it.

    There are very powerful interests who demand “freedom” in order to do as they like with the environment, society and the economy. They have infused a very large part of American culture with the belief that “freedom” is literally more important than life. My freedom to own assault weapons trumps your right not to get shot at school. Now, my freedom to go to the barber (“I Need a Haircut” read one banner this week in St Paul, Minnesota) trumps your need to avoid infection.

    Usually, when this kind of outlandish idiocy is displaying itself, there is the comforting thought that, if things were really serious, it would all stop. People would sober up. Instead, a large part of the US has hit the bottle even harder.

    And the president, his party and their media allies keep supplying the drinks. There has been no moment of truth, no shock of realisation that the antics have to end. No one of any substance on the US right has stepped in to say: get a grip, people are dying here.

    If he is re-elected, toxicity will have become the lifeblood of American politics That is the mark of how deep the trouble is for the US – it is not just that Trump has treated the crisis merely as a way to feed tribal hatreds but that this behaviour has become normalised. When the freak show is live on TV every evening, and the star is boasting about his ratings, it is not really a freak show any more. For a very large and solid bloc of Americans, it is reality.

    And this will get worse before it gets better. Trump has at least eight more months in power. In his inaugural address in 2017, he evoked “American carnage” and promised to make it stop. But now that the real carnage has arrived, he is revelling in it. He is in his element.

    As things get worse, he will pump more hatred and falsehood, more death-wish defiance of reason and decency, into the groundwater. If a new administration succeeds him in 2021, it will have to clean up the toxic dump he leaves behind. If he is re-elected, toxicity will have become the lifeblood of American politics. Either way, it will be a long time before the rest of the world can imagine America being great again.

    Fintan O’Toole is an Irish columnist, literary editor, and drama critic for The Irish Times, for which he has written since 1988.
    No one told you you have to live here.........

    Just go to Mexico or Uganda if you like it better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CalG View Post

    ***

    Shame on those folks in Minnesota for not social distancing. They should be ashamed for endangering others.

    What, you got a problem with this exceptionally refined display of black culture? This is afro-rationality. It's like 110% cis-white-male racist thinking that blacks shouldn't be allowed to riot and burn businesses to the ground. Becuz white privilege.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tim9lives View Post
    FINTAN O’TOOLE. Donald Trump has destroyed the country he promised to make great again

    <snip>

    Fintan O’Toole is an Irish columnist, literary editor, and drama critic for The Irish Times, for which he has written since 1988.
    People in glass houses...

    The author should have checked the stats before making his comparisons. Dallas has 1/5 the infections and 1/3 mortality rate of Dublin. Florida, Georgia, Texas are all lower than Ireland in terms of infections per capita and mortality rate. Like 50-100% lower...

    Drama critic? Maybe drama queen would be more accurate...

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    Quote Originally Posted by jancollc View Post
    People in glass houses...

    The author should have checked the stats before making his comparisons. Dallas has 1/5 the infections and 1/3 mortality rate of Dublin. Florida, Georgia, Texas are all lower than Ireland in terms of infections per capita and mortality rate. Like 50-100% lower...

    Drama critic? Maybe drama queen would be more accurate...
    I’m not really sure about your logic. Do you insinuate that since not every county in America has a high rate of infections than its bogus. The New York infection rate was bogus ? I’m curious....should we have just not sheltered in place....let the virus spread outward from New York. I’m sure that during the 1918 pandemic...New York was also one of the first places the virus spread out ward. It was port of entry from returning WWI Veterans. And probably from New York...it then went to the train depots across America.
    Your logic....Dallas having a low rate while New York has 1/2 the National death rate....That would be akin to China telling the world....Beijing has a low rate of infected so forget about concern over Wuhan China.

    You really should donate your brain to science upon your passing because the logic is fascinating. Really is.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Straightedge View Post
    What, you got a problem with this exceptionally refined display of black culture? This is afro-rationality. It's like 110% cis-white-male racist thinking that blacks shouldn't be allowed to riot and burn businesses to the ground. Becuz white privilege.
    Actually, if you've seen the footage quite a few of the most active "protesters" are white. It looks as though the Antifa/anarchist crowd has selected Minneapolis as the scene for one of their latest public tantrums.

    I also see young black people acting up but I wonder if the intruders started the violence ball rolling.

    I saw one clip where a local black man said that while they appreciate the support of whites and hispanics "This is not your space". I suspect it was a direct criticism of some of the more violent "supporters".

    PS: I look forward to hearing that cop try to explain why kneeling on someone's neck for a prolonged period could be expected NOT to end badly. Thanks to his actions a part of his city is being destroyed.

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