Places to buy made in USA goods? - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    My Huebsch Laundry machine is made by Alliance Laundry Systems in the US, awesome super solid machine made to last like the old ones were, unlike all the mexico/china import junk. I'll buy the matching dryer as well when the time comes. Wahl hair/beard trimmer USA.
    New Frigidaire fridge bought a few months ago says assembled in USA, previous one did too but almost everything else in store was mexico/china.
    Almost all my shop tooling is USA, other than the Mit's stuff. Avoiding china like plague for shop tools.

    I always look at labels and pick USA/Canada first even if its more $, every time!
    some US companies need to be a better job with marketting, nobody knows Huebsch/Alliance Laundry, yet everyone complains about the junk disposable import washers/dryers. There would be a huge market for more quality US/Canada made appliances if someone would just make and market them properly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    I get buy domestic. I get buy made in Michigan.
    What I do not get is buy Germany, Japan and even Vietnam okay but China not.
    Bob
    Some people do not like to support communism, and or don't like the huge trade deficit with China. There is enough Chinese junk on store shelves. If my choices are between items made in 3rd world countries I will chose Mexico, to help a neighbor and make things better there.

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  4. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by bucktruck View Post
    Are you new here? That's just Gordon being Gordon, unfortunately. Perhaps if collectively we stopped quoting him he would refrain from responding EVERY SINGLE TIME but I doubt it.

    While I think ignore lists are for pu$$ies, it does get tiring seeing his endless posts which 80% of the time have nothing to do with the topic at hand.

    That being said, I still disagree with him being banned.
    He is not...but YOU are.

    "Gordo being Gordo" doesn't make any sense.

    Get the loonie troll off the forum, permanently.

  5. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    That last sentence pretty much sums up the situation for many. If buying domestic was VERY important to me (again never forgetting "when quality and price is comparable") then what I could do is change where I purchase. I'm lucky in that there are more shops and stores within 10 minutes of where I live than I can count. I have my preferences and some I shop in much more than others.

    As far as hand tools go I can choose between at least 5 places and all within a few minutes of each other. In my experience none of them sell "cheap crap" but there is a difference in the quality and price of what they sell.

    I fully understand that not all are lucky enough to have multiple choices and often have to "take what they can get".
    It is hard to find good quality appliances today without having to purchase a warranty. My washing machine and dryer are Whirlpool and Maytag yet I keep getting mail from the manufacture to buy an extended warranty. In the past(parents appliances) we never purchased a warranty because the products my parent bought lasted 20-25 years. Todays standards I believe the life of a washing machine is around 7-10 years if you are lucky. I didn't get a warranty because I don't see spending $280.00 for a 3 year warranty on a $550.00 washing machine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawnrs View Post
    It is hard to find good quality appliances today without having to purchase a warranty. My washing machine and dryer are Whirlpool and Maytag yet I keep getting mail from the manufacture to buy an extended warranty. In the past(parents appliances) we never purchased a warranty because the products my parent bought lasted 20-25 years. Todays standards I believe the life of a washing machine is around 7-10 years if you are lucky. I didn't get a warranty because I don't see spending $280.00 for a 3 year warranty on a $550.00 washing machine.
    I guess I am lucky with wash machines. I have been doing laundry since I was 7 and that is 51 years and never had one break on me. Dryers on the other hand are a different story. Had the current one 8 years and have repaired it 3 times. I must have done dryer repair about 10 times in my lifetime. My grandma had an old wringer wash machine she was still using in the early 80's.

  7. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawnrs View Post
    It is hard to find good quality appliances today without having to purchase a warranty. My washing machine and dryer are Whirlpool and Maytag yet I keep getting mail from the manufacture to buy an extended warranty. In the past(parents appliances) we never purchased a warranty because the products my parent bought lasted 20-25 years. Todays standards I believe the life of a washing machine is around 7-10 years if you are lucky. I didn't get a warranty because I don't see spending $280.00 for a 3 year warranty on a $550.00 washing machine.
    My wife bought a Whirlpool washer and dryer 6 years ago and so far never a problem. Our grill is a Weber and the most popular make here. In the Summer we grill at least 3 times a week.

    whirlpool.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    My wife bought a Whirlpool washer and dryer 6 years ago and so far never a problem. Our grill is a Weber and the most popular make here. In the Summer we grill at least 3 times a week.

    whirlpool.jpg
    Is it common there to have your laundry in the kitchen? I live in FL and it is fairly common here to have them outside, or in a garage. Ours are in an attached 'outbuilding' of sorts, washer, dryer and water heater.

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    I have never done a load of laundry but I am the one who keeps appliances running. I had both Whirlpool and Maytag washers and dryers and used the extended warranty several times. Do yourself a favor, buy Speed Queen. I have never had a problem since I bought them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1974 View Post
    Is it common there to have your laundry in the kitchen? I live in FL and it is fairly common here to have them outside, or in a garage. Ours are in an attached 'outbuilding' of sorts, washer, dryer and water heater.
    They're not in our kitchen Our dish washer is in the kitchen with all other relevant kitchen appliances. In the majority of Danish houses there is a room (the first room entered at the back door) where a sink, the water heater, shoes most often used etc. are.

    In Danish that room is called a "bryggers" and all Danes will know what I mean. The word "scullery" probably is closest although some are much nicer than others
    Last edited by Gordon B. Clarke; 06-26-2019 at 01:35 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    I guess I am lucky with wash machines. I have been doing laundry since I was 7 and that is 51 years and never had one break on me. Dryers on the other hand are a different story. Had the current one 8 years and have repaired it 3 times. I must have done dryer repair about 10 times in my lifetime. My grandma had an old wringer wash machine she was still using in the early 80's.
    On my 3rd washing machine over the last 21 years. The new one is only 9 months old and that is great. I think with towels getting much larger then seem to put more strain on the washing machine when it is on the spin cycle. As for dryer, I am on my second one and that one is about 8 years old.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    My wife bought a Whirlpool washer and dryer 6 years ago and so far never a problem. Our grill is a Weber and the most popular make here. In the Summer we grill at least 3 times a week.

    whirlpool.jpg
    I bought a Maytag top loader without the tall agitator and I can say I am impressed with this washing machine. I think it will last much longer than the previous washing machines.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike1974 View Post
    Is it common there to have your laundry in the kitchen? I live in FL and it is fairly common here to have them outside, or in a garage. Ours are in an attached 'outbuilding' of sorts, washer, dryer and water heater.
    I have a washer, dryer, and water heater in my kitchen. Kind of temporary, laundry room had to be ripped apart to replace pipes and needs a remodel anyway. I connected the water heater to hoses, it is semi portable, it is sitting next to my stove. I call it kind of temporary because of a fused spine, two shoulders that need operations plus working in the shop the project is moving along slowly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    fused spine, two shoulders that need operations plus working in the shop the project is moving along slowly.
    Maybe it is time to pay someone to help with the heavy work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by converterking View Post
    Maybe it is time to pay someone to help with the heavy work.
    I don't have a great batting average hiring out construction work. At my last place I burned through 3 electricians just getting a service panel upgrade on the house, 50 yards of cable laid and a service entrance installed on a new shop. #1 was fired because he tried pounding the new box in between studs instead of cutting them, his efforts knocked plaster off of an inside wall. #2 showed up late high on something and said he couldn't start for a few more days. Even though I had my shop helper use a trencher to dig a trench of proper depth plus a few inches #3 decided to back fill after the last turn and install the conduit 6" too shallow, that was just one of his many gaffes the inspector caught. All three were licensed and two of them refereed by friends, maybe those "friends" secretly hated me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    I don't have a great batting average hiring out construction work. At my last place I burned through 3 electricians just getting a service panel upgrade on the house, 50 yards of cable laid and a service entrance installed on a new shop. #1 was fired because he tried pounding the new box in between studs instead of cutting them, his efforts knocked plaster off of an inside wall. #2 showed up late high on something and said he couldn't start for a few more days. Even though I had my shop helper use a trencher to dig a trench of proper depth plus a few inches #3 decided to back fill after the last turn and install the conduit 6" too shallow, that was just one of his many gaffes the inspector caught. All three were licensed and two of them refereed by friends, maybe those "friends" secretly hated me.
    I don't mean hire people for skilled work. Demolition, (tearing down walls and floors, ect.) should be done by a younger person so you save your body for the skilled work. When you are done with electrical and plumbing, hire someone to do the drywall and flooring.

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    How important is a trademark?

    YouTube

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    In Danish that room is called a "bryggers" and all Danes will know what I mean. The word "scullery" probably is closest although some are much nicer than others
    In the northern US that would be a mud room. Not sure they have those in the desert. Sculleries disappeared with kitchen sluts

  21. #58
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    Its pretty simple why appliances dont last as long today-
    Its because they are so much cheaper in inflation adjusted dollars.

    Here is a simple example-
    this link shows the prices of a 1962 American made, high quality, long lasting, washer and dryer.
    Sixties Electrical goods and appliances in the 1960's prices examples from The People History Site
    Washer, $185, Dryer, $130.
    Add em up, $315 in 1962 dollars.
    now, go to an inflation calculator website, and translate that 315 into todays dollars.
    $2617.

    So, as I understand it, you are expecting $2600 quality for $1000.
    When somebody comes to my shop and says that, I laugh.

    There are appliances today that are high quality, and last a long time.
    But they dont cost $500.

    Most american companies have followed a simple model- keep the price more or less the same, and lower the quality.

    Most european companies just raise the price-
    Hence, the $6000 Liebherr fridge from Germany, which is solidly built, free of annoying crap like internet connections, and works and lasts a long time.
    If you consider that, versus a $500 Frigidare, are you really surprised when the Frigidare is mostly made of crappy plastic parts, and has a five year lifespan?

    You dont get something for nothing. I run a shop- I know what my monthly overhead is for insurance, rent, utilities, labor, taxes, materials, etc.
    NO way you can make decent product for the prices Home Depot is selling appliances for, and have them last.

    There are plenty of good quality things in the world- they just arent priced at 1962 prices anymore.
    You want quality, you can get it, but you pays the price.

    There are still some american companies that make expensive, long lasting things, but they have mostly found that americans are underpaid, and cheap, so they market globally, and find less and less market here.
    And the global companies that make quality dont spend that much time marketing here, because other countries will pay the price.

    This is the story of lathes, for instance- the Japanese, Swiss, Germans, Spanish, and Italians all make decent manual lathes.
    Most long ago gave up having US sales organisations, because we wont pay what it costs.
    A decent manual lathe these days costs $50k to $100k.
    European companies buy new Weilers and Schaublins lathes, or Felhman or Kunzmann milling machines.
    Japanese companies buy similar quality japan made lathes.

    People in the US want $10,000 chinese, or, if they are feeling really extravagant, might spend $30k on an easter european machine- but wont buy the top end stuff.
    So the companies don even bother trying to sell to us anymore.

    If you expect new jeans to cost ten bucks, you get what you pay for, and its from Bangladesh.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ries View Post
    Most american companies have followed a simple model- keep the price more or less the same, and lower the quality.
    It's been over 30 years since I stopped smoking but, and I have no idea if some tobacco companies still do so, at one time there were only 19 cigarettes in a pack to keep the price down.

    Same with many other everyday items. There isn't as much in a packet etc. as there was.

    Re "How long do you have to work?" to buy something is there anything more expensive today that say 40 years ago?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon B. Clarke View Post
    is there anything more expensive today that say 40 years ago?
    Houses and cars and candy bars.


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