Tesla and EV cars - update and thoughts - Page 48
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 48 of 61 FirstFirst ... 38464748495058 ... LastLast
Results 941 to 960 of 1216
  1. #941
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    1,355
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    100

    Default

    Didn't the same thing happen in New Orleans with the street cars?

  2. #942
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Country
    SPAIN
    Posts
    3,153
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1660
    Likes (Received)
    1104

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Depends on how much you drive.
    Using your math I spend about $4800 a year on fuel and there is no way I'm considering a electric car at this point.
    Will we have "gas" stations with quick change electric packs? I think that is where we end up.
    Long life of the battery or replacement cost goes away.
    Will there be a Betamax vs VHS deal?
    The average person now will tolerate 5-10 minutes to refuel. Charging stations can not do this.
    Maybe charging batteries on phones and such will change the way we think but so much over the road transportation is dollars per minute and any downtime is money lost.
    We are in the infant days, so much to shake out.
    Bob
    I thought a lot of cars had the batteries into the floor where you can't get to them anyway, let alone swap them out?
    And I wouldn't swap out my $300 ebike battery for someone elses, because mine was flat.

    And trucks - how the heck is that ever going to work - long haul with perishable goods sat charging...let alone the cost of it sat charging?

    Surely hybrid engine has got to be the best way to go - then when in town (polutable areas) you can run on electric only, and on the freeway run on gas/derv?

    It's not as if we're going to run out of oil anytime soon...

  3. #943
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Edison Washington USA
    Posts
    10,319
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    964
    Likes (Received)
    5318

    Default

    I guess we will see about trucks- Diamler has 2 all electric test trucks on the road now in California, one of which is its Freightliner Cascadia, the number one selling semi in the USA. They are also testing a smaller truck, a Freightliner M2, another extremely common truck on US roads.

    These will never replace ALL trucks, of course- but there is still a huge market for them. In places like California, (the fifth largest economy in the world, with a lot of trucking going on) there are a lot of companies which routinely run from LA to Phoenix or Vegas or SF or Portland or Seattle, multiple trips every day. They have their own terminals in those, and lots of other western US cities. If you have a regular daily run between, say Riverside and Vegas, which is under 250 miles, there is no reason you couldnt have 440 volt fast chargers at your terminals at each end, and have the trucks turnaround in a few hours.

    Obviously, the smaller M2s are used for thousands of runs every day in major cities, where they are making deliveries of less than 250 total miles a day, and back at the terminal every night- a perfect candidate for overnight charging.
    UPS alone runs 100,000 trucks every day in the USA- even if only 25,000 of them were suitable for electric trucks, thats still a HUGE market, one that Diamler and other major truck manufacturers would be all to happy to sell to.
    My guess is the US electric truck market, even if the range is only 250 miles, is well over 5000 trucks a year pretty easily, and, as batteries improve, if they could get it up to 500, would double or triple that in just a few years.

    The market is there. The trucks are coming.
    These two Diamler/Freightliners are running now, fine tuning the design for a truck that will be sold very soon- its not pie in the sky, its well under way.

    Quiet launch: Daimler builds first electric heavy-duty semis for fleet test

  4. Likes cnctoolcat liked this post
  5. #944
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Country
    UNITED KINGDOM
    Posts
    1,925
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    889

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ries View Post
    its not pie in the sky, its well under way.
    There's a floatplane company in Sechelt that runs to Vancouver, Nanaimo, Whistler, and some other places. They use DeHavilland Beavers (I think - it's the size smaller than the Otter ?).

    They are in the process of changing to electric motors

  6. #945
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Edison Washington USA
    Posts
    10,319
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    964
    Likes (Received)
    5318

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    There's a floatplane company in Sechelt that runs to Vancouver, Nanaimo, Whistler, and some other places. They use DeHavilland Beavers (I think - it's the size smaller than the Otter ?).

    They are in the process of changing to electric motors
    there is a slight difference between one guy, trying out a conversion on ONE of his airplanes- in cooperation with the company that is making this electric motor-
    AND
    a test program, already under way for some years, by the 10th largest automaker in the world, a $167 Billion dollar a year company.

    I tend to take the seriousness, and the possibility of success, a bit more for Diamler than the Magni-X company of australia, which is currently working on its first (this one, the Harbour Air plane) conversion to an electric motor.
    Diamler has invested over one billion euros into recent research and development of electric cars, and has ten different electric models due to be for sale by 2022. Diamler has sold thousands of electric cars already. The Magni-X guys are still working on one...


    Harbour Air starts multi-year conversion to electric-powered flight | Coast Reporter

  7. Likes Scottl liked this post
  8. #946
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Country
    UNITED KINGDOM
    Posts
    1,925
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    889

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ries View Post
    there is a slight difference between one guy, trying out a conversion on ONE of his airplanes- in cooperation with the company that is making this electric motor-
    AND
    a test program, already under way for some years, by the 10th largest automaker in the world, a $167 Billion dollar a year company.
    Is there some rule that says "Gordon must be a snotty prick" ? It's not "one guy" it's a small airline with 42 planes and 30,000 flights per year. Of course it's not Daimler but on the other hand, when the motor fails you don't pull off to the side of the road, either.

    It's interesting.

  9. #947
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    6,276
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    9368
    Likes (Received)
    2939

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    Is there some rule that says "Gordon must be a snotty prick" ? It's not "one guy" it's a small airline with 42 planes and 30,000 flights per year. Of course it's not Daimler but on the other hand, when the motor fails you don't pull off to the side of the road, either.

    It's interesting.
    You also don't just put an electric motor in an airplane and go to work. U.S. or Canada, there are rather stringent requirements for safety that are nothing to sneeze at.A Supplemental Type Certification takes forever to be approved, even for something as simple as the use of auto gas in light planes. In addition, even if it somehow worked, you need to be able to carry more than a battery.
    Y

  10. Likes Scottl liked this post
  11. #948
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Tennessee
    Posts
    444
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    139
    Likes (Received)
    115

    Default

    CapeAir (the best airline to fly if you get a chance), contracted for a few ev planes at the Paris Show. Seimens ev plane unit was just sold to Rolls Royce on these planes. No longer in the early rich visionary toy stages. Delivery is due in 2022.

  12. #949
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Country
    SPAIN
    Posts
    3,153
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1660
    Likes (Received)
    1104

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    Is there some rule that says "Gordon must be a snotty prick" ? It's not "one guy" it's a small airline with 42 planes and 30,000 flights per year. Of course it's not Daimler but on the other hand, when the motor fails you don't pull off to the side of the road, either.

    It's interesting.
    It is interesting....
    A mate was involved at concept design (UK) with an Eleccy Aircraft but they put a line through it because the technology isn't there at the moment.
    It was at the drawing board stage where it was catch-22 - the weight of the batteries needed larger engines to lift, and in specifying larger engines they then needed more batteries to power them...

    I've been following the MotoE world championships (EV MotoGP bikes) and although yes it is interesting, it's still no-where near the halcyon 2stroke era in my view. It is VERY early days.
    And they had one fire which burnt the paddock area down (they've had a couple of fires to date and boy do they go up!).
    With so many batteries in a truck (or in a plane), they're going to need something more than the Dreamliners titanium tube out the fuselage to vent the flames...

  13. Likes mkd liked this post
  14. #950
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Maryland- USA
    Posts
    3,333
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1928
    Likes (Received)
    2129

    Default

    I am a little out of date but electric propulsion in airplanes is proven and has been for some time to the degree that there are operational concept planes flying and at least one manufacturer is offering a e-trainer.


    Alpha Electro – Pipistrel

    and yep..
    I was out of date- the sector is heating up:
    Electric aircraft development rising fast | Aerospace Testing International

  15. #951
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    4,085
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4404
    Likes (Received)
    4292

    Default

    IMO this is more publicity stunt than practical plan for the near future. I looked at several things including the link Trboatworks provided for the electric trainer.

    While the trainer makes sense on many levels the idea that a much heavier multipassenger floatplane can be converted to electric propulsion at the level of technology today and in the near future is IMO a pipe dream. This chart compares the Dehaviland Beaver to the Pipistrel electric trainer. Note that while length and wingspan are fairly close there is a huge difference in payload.

    beaver-vs-pipistrel.jpg

    An electric trainer makes sense. Short flight close to home base and the lack of engine noise not only reduces annoyance to people on the ground but also makes it easier for the pilot and trainee to communicate. The Pipistrel, like all current electric planes is pretty much a sailplane with a propeller. Payload is fixed at two passengers and no need to haul cargo.

    The floatplane on the other hand must not only carry multiple passengers plus luggage but also heavy cargo with the seats removed. And while the issue of leaded avgas is a real pollution issue there are solutions much closer to hand. Unleaded avgas is currently being tested and the ideal solution, although more expensive than changing gas is a conversion to turboprop. Dehaviland built the first turbo Beavers more than a half century ago and there are conversions being done today. The converted planes have greater payload capacity and can even accommodate a stretched cabin.


  16. Likes barbter liked this post
  17. #952
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Maryland- USA
    Posts
    3,333
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1928
    Likes (Received)
    2129

    Default

    I do notice Boeing seems to have pulled some of its electric aircraft content from site.

    Interesting byline:

    Pipistrel was ready to cross the channel with one of their aircraft supplied with Siemens motors.
    Siemens yanked the certificate from the power plant at the last moment and killed the test while allowing Airbus to do the crossing with their gear in that dual motor ducted plane they developed and thus landing the bragging rights.

    Seemed sort of hard play but ...

    Electric aircraft makes first English Channel crossing

    Pipistrel came up out of sailplanes- their aircraft are very efficient designs- ideal I suppose for first forays into e-flight.

    Nothing to sneeze at...:

    E-Fan X - Electric flight - Airbus

    Electric flight - Future technology - Airbus

  18. #953
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Edison Washington USA
    Posts
    10,319
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    964
    Likes (Received)
    5318

    Default

    I have never been accused of being Gordon before- I am guessing, in person, we are pretty easy to tell apart.

    Anyway, I dont doubt that there will be electric airplanes at some date, and that they will work. Just not soon.

    But they are putting electric trucks on the road now- test beds, for sure, but working models, ordinary trucks with electric motors, and they will be for sale in a year or two.

    And companies will buy electric semi tractors, and electric delivery trucks, by the thousands.

    And when the electric pickup truck starts to reach reasonable prices you will be seeing a lot of them.
    There are a few electric pickups out there now, but they are expensive, and not haulers.
    Of course, of the pickups in america now, the vast majority are grocery getters, that never tow a trailer, haul a half ton load, and, if they are 4WD, have never been put in low.

  19. #954
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    14,527
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    There's a floatplane company in Sechelt that runs to Vancouver, Nanaimo, Whistler, and some other places. They use DeHavilland Beavers (I think - it's the size smaller than the Otter ?).

    They are in the process of changing to electric motors
    Just don't get 'em wet.....

  20. #955
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    1,035
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    710
    Likes (Received)
    451

    Default

    I'm pretty impressed with Hybrid Honda accord. I know i'm 15 years late to the party. ha!
    Just pretty cool to be able to pull away from a stop and get upto 20-30 mph on full electric mode @ '100mpg'.
    If an 18 year old with no insurance would'nt have smashed into my GTO at 40mph, i'd still be a gas swilling fool running an LS2.

  21. Likes barbter liked this post
  22. #956
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    4,085
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4404
    Likes (Received)
    4292

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mkd View Post
    I'm pretty impressed with Hybrid Honda accord. I know i'm 15 years late to the party. ha!
    Just pretty cool to be able to pull away from a stop and get upto 20-30 mph on full electric mode @ '100mpg'.
    If an 18 year old with no insurance would'nt have smashed into my GTO at 40mph, i'd still be a gas swilling fool running an LS2.
    And there's the rub. While hybrids (and especially plug-in hybrids) work extremely well with today's technology and infrastructure, a segment of the population is trying to sell us on the idea of pure BEVs as some kind of universal solution despite the fact that they still have serious limitations compared to conventional vehicles and hybrids.

  23. Likes mkd liked this post
  24. #957
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Country
    DENMARK
    Posts
    3,154
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4007
    Likes (Received)
    12665

    Default

    In some countries in Europe electrical vehicles (and not just cars) are becoming common and popular. Buses and even taxis. It's only a question of the distance between recharging.

    Some countres are even discussing banning diesel cars older than 10 years from driving into cities.

    I don't like anyone telling me what I can or can't do if it doesn't make economic sense to me. If a veganer tried telling me what I could and couldn't eat I'd become pro cannibalism!

  25. Likes Scottl liked this post
  26. #958
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    1,035
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    710
    Likes (Received)
    451

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    And there's the rub. While hybrids (and especially plug-in hybrids) work extremely well with today's technology and infrastructure, a segment of the population is trying to sell us on the idea of pure BEVs as some kind of universal solution despite the fact that they still have serious limitations compared to conventional vehicles and hybrids.
    $13 electric bill for 2-300 mile range with no oil or transmission (tranny's are the weak link in gas cars what a joke) changes has got me convinced. Just gotta work on the purchase price.

  27. #959
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Country
    SPAIN
    Posts
    3,153
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1660
    Likes (Received)
    1104

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    And there's the rub. While hybrids (and especially plug-in hybrids) work extremely well with today's technology and infrastructure, a segment of the population is trying to sell us on the idea of pure BEVs as some kind of universal solution despite the fact that they still have serious limitations compared to conventional vehicles and hybrids.
    +1
    I can understand the need to keep city air clean. Stinky diesel lorries in town produce the yellow smog haze that can be seen from afar.
    And we all know that it is bad to breath. We knew that in the UK back in the 80/90's when the gov pushed/supported the drive for diesel because it was apparently better for us all
    Roll forwards to today, and although the technology is a whole lot cleaner, there's a crap ton of vehicles still driving around polluting.

  28. #960
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Edison Washington USA
    Posts
    10,319
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    964
    Likes (Received)
    5318

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    And there's the rub. While hybrids (and especially plug-in hybrids) work extremely well with today's technology and infrastructure, a segment of the population is trying to sell us on the idea of pure BEVs as some kind of universal solution despite the fact that they still have serious limitations compared to conventional vehicles and hybrids.
    NOBODY is trying to sell BEV's as a "universal solution".

    Here, and in the real world, predictions are that for short haul passenger vehicles, we will see a gradual replacement.
    It is true that the Chinese government may, in 20 to 30 years, "ban" internal combustion engines- after all, they are dictators- but its possible that the fine print, which isnt written and probably never will be, will miraculously exempt a fair amount of vehicles, too.

    But in the USA, where I live, the idea of a 100% forced conversion to electric is silly paranoia.
    We all know it aint happening.

    Daily, though, I see more and more people buying, of their own volition, without jackbooted government force, electric cars.

  29. Likes mkd, hanermo, neilho liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •