20" bandsaw upright in F150 pickup
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  1. #1
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    Default 20" bandsaw upright in F150 pickup

    I am looking*at buying a powermatic metal/wood bandsaw which will weighh about 1200 poounds. a little over six feet tall. can it be hauled upright in the back of a f150 pickup. or is it too tall and the center of gravity will make the trcuk to tippy for freeway speeds. I do not like the newer trucks that jacked up the whole truck to make it look tougher. It raise the CofG several inches over the older designs for no reason except to make bed access harder.
    I will remove the table. I bet the upper wheel could come off if needed as well.
    Bill D.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    I am looking*at buying a powermatic metal/wood bandsaw which will weighh about 1200 poounds. a little over six feet tall. can it be hauled upright in the back of a f150 pickup. or is it too tall and the center of gravity will make the trcuk to tippy for freeway speeds. I do not like the newer trucks that jacked up the whole truck to make it look tougher. It raise the CofG several inches over the older designs for no reason except to make bed access harder.
    I will remove the table. I bet the upper wheel could come off if needed as well.
    Bill D.
    .
    .
    most machines are bolted down to a big heavy duty wood pallet. sometimes binding nylon straps are used the ones you tighten with ratchet mechanism they are rated in tons the bigger ones. pallets are often made from big wood timbers bolted together

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    Strap it down , drive slow, know your limitations


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    I would suggest renting a drop deck trailer. It will save a lot of work in the move and there will be no question of the high CG messing up the truck handling.

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    I agree with Illinoyance rent a trailer for a day. The biggest problem I see is that there is nothing substantial on an F150 to tie it to, I mean to really strap it down.

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    My F-150 has 4 tie-down points that are pretty damn secure.

    I transported my vertical band saw in the bed with 4 ratchet straps and lived to tell the tale.

    Wasn't scary at all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jancollc View Post
    My F-150 has 4 tie-down points that are pretty damn secure.

    I transported my vertical band saw in the bed with 4 ratchet straps and lived to tell the tale.

    Wasn't scary at all.
    Yup, same thing with a 20" Delta.

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    I've transported an 1800 pound load in my little T100 where the center of mass was about the top of the bed, and it didn't feel sketchy at all. I took turns slow and never sped though. I always have a massively overbuilt (not heavy, so maybe overengineered is a better term) lumber rack I can very securely tie things to.

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    Try a Moore #2. It is not only possible, but it's a better thrill than a roller coaster.

    Good tie straps or chain and binders along with sensible driving and it will work. Stop a few times and check your load.


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    I transported a 1964 V ram J head BP in the back of an old D 250 Dodge PU. Framed base in with 2 x 4's so it couldn't slide around and tied off to eye-bolts in the bed rail. Removed head and ram for transport. Drove from Camden, NJ to Albany, NY (235 miles) with no issues. Drive careful, pay attention, and you'll be fine.

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    Block the base so it can't skitter about. Just straps and ropes holding it to the bed aren't enough.

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    Should be fine but put a tiedown from the hitch, over the tailgate, to the saw, then hook in with multiple tiedowns along the bed sides, not just in the stake hole tops as the hooks will pull the sheet metal up around the holes- you need to get the hooks down inside the stake holes and/or use cleats in the bed if you have them. 2 tie downs per side, not one going across.. Tie the wheel doors and motor doors closed.

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    Here's Bill.....Saw sticking up like Lady Liberty in the back of the f-150,
    tooling down the freeway:...

    Eagles - 'Ol' 55' (lyrics in description) - YouTube

    "Cars are all passing me, trucks are all flashing me"

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    By design bandsaws are column loaded heavier on the one side . They tip easier in the direction that has the saw frame, I have a do all saw with the skid the same width as the base. when I lift it with both forks spread as wide as the base and lift. it almost wants to tip to the heavy side. Use a wide skid and bolt the saw down good in the center and spread the forks out as wide as possible.
    The weight is distributed off center.

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    Hmm. I recently hauled a 6x18 surface grinder and an Amada HA250 automatic bandsaw with outfeed table in an F-250. All the way to Texas. No issues.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    I am looking*at buying a powermatic metal/wood bandsaw which will weighh about 1200 poounds. a little over six feet tall. can it be hauled upright in the back of a f150 pickup.
    How many miles of travel? You are over the 1/2 ton limit. It will also be no fun when unloading.

    I never exceeded 500-600 pounds in the bed. Drop trailer would be easier.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    How many miles of travel? You are over the 1/2 ton limit. It will also be no fun when unloading.

    I never exceeded 500-600 pounds in the bed. Drop trailer would be easier.
    Isn't the half ton rating more a class than an actual specification? Stay under your GVWR and GAWR and you will be fine. Most reasonably modern half ton pickups can handle much more than a half ton.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    How many miles of travel? You are over the 1/2 ton limit. It will also be no fun when unloading.

    I never exceeded 500-600 pounds in the bed. Drop trailer would be easier.
    A little under 400 miles, 3000' up and down. Two of those passes are known worldwide for the windmills installed there due to strong winds.
    Ford has not rated a truck in tons after the Model A was replaced by more modern designs. The current F150 is rated for about 1400 pounds of payload.
    Bill D

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    I've had 3000 lbs in the bed of my F-250. Unfortunately, the cross members under the box have rotted. She loses a few pounds every time I load it.

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    I brought a 50 ton H-frame hydraulic press home recently, using only a small flatbed trailer. I transported it upright. My philosophy is one strap pulling it backwards and another one pulling it forwards. This press was quite top-heavy. Strapped in, I was good for everything except a full-on car wreck. Truckers, of course, have to secure their loads as though they were going to experience a collision. But we don't. You do have to drive very carefully, though.

    metalmagpie


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