Amazing this ship carrying container handling cranes does not tip over
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  1. #1
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    Default Amazing this ship carrying container handling cranes does not tip over

    Soo much weight soo high up. All cranes pointing the same direction.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    Soo much weight soo high up. All cranes pointing the same direction.

    iCloud

    iCloud

    iCloud

    With the powerhouse mounted on the backreach and the boom down they are not too far out of trim on a vessel.

    In the US they get moved around on barges - I have some short videos but no luck posting them. A former employee handles crane moves at his new job. In the last 18 mos. they have hauled 2 from Long Beach to Everett, Wa and 2 from Seattle to Tacoma.

    iCloud

    iCloud



    It takes a whole lot of very specialIzed equipment to jack them up, turn them twice and roll onto the barge. Repeat at the other end.

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    Big things are amazing. Some engineers spent years with their slide rules and #2 pencils figuring out how to build that thing, make it float properly, and not rip apart at the seams. Definitely out of my league...I have trouble chewing gum and walking at the same time.


    Stuart

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    These ships also use services that carefully observe and predict the weather and sea state along the route. Ships are re-routed if bad weather develops along the intended course. I’ve seen them off loading cargo like this at work. A lot of careful planning with tides and ballasting required.

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    Quote Originally Posted by atomarc View Post
    Big things are amazing. Some engineers spent years with their slide rules and #2 pencils figuring out how to build that thing, make it float properly, and not rip apart at the seams. Definitely out of my league...I have trouble chewing gum and walking at the same time.


    Stuart
    As seen in public.....
    Seriously, if you read the book "The Box", the original container crane was proven out with his son's "Erector set" by the designing engineer.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dimlbert-chewing-gum.jpg  

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    I bet the buyer (presumably the port) specified which direction the cranes would be oriented on board, with an eye on which dock the ship would eventually offload at. Logistics for big things are pretty interesting, too.

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    If that was a barge traversing local waterways I wouldn't be soo astounded , but on the open ocean that looks like one hellva scary transport, but the folks involved are experts so obviously appearances can be deceiving.


    Brand new Chinese built port cranes break loose of their moorings and collide with existing cranes at the port of Felixstowe, destroying 2 of the existing cranes.


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    On a tangent: how did China become a dominant port crane manufacturer ? I would have thought such heavy engineerig specialized equipment purchased by ports in Europe and America would be sourced from within Europe and America.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    On a tangent: how did China become a dominant port crane manufacturer ? I would have thought such heavy engineerig specialized equipment purchased by ports in Europe and America would be sourced from within Europe and America.
    If I had to guess: cheap labour and cheap steel. They also have a large home market where others can not( or are perhaps not even alowwed to) compete. Worldwide transport, if compared to the value of the transported product, is almost never a deciding factor anymore.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spud View Post
    On a tangent: how did China become a dominant port crane manufacturer ? I would have thought such heavy engineerig specialized equipment purchased by ports in Europe and America would be sourced from within Europe and America.
    Big stuff takes long-term planning and commitment. US companies refuse to do that.

    Just a couple years ago the assholes at Rexnord closed Falk and auctioned them off. They could make more money that year putting a shopping center on the site so who cares about 2023 ? Falk was well over a hundred years old, had equipment and abilities available nowhere else in the US, good work force, profitable, just not profitable enough for the worthless scum running that company. Irreplaceable, in fact.

    With people like that at the top, what do you expect ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by atomarc View Post
    Big things are amazing. Some engineers spent years with their slide rules and #2 pencils figuring out how to build that thing, make it float properly, and not rip apart at the seams. Definitely out of my league...I have trouble chewing gum and walking at the same time.


    Stuart
    No fear. US Navy had the genius to make damned sure every sailor DID chew gum.

    Leaks were patched expeditiously whilst still small,

    Warhips were kept afloat

    Wars were won.

    And swabbies didn't HAVE to walk home atop the waters - pretending to be web-footed Marines.

    They had their priorities right!

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    I remember reading about a oil tanker unloading in a Dutch port. They guys did not do it correctly. As I recall they unloaded the middle completley leaving the fore and aft tanks completely full. (I could have that backwards. You are supposed to balance where the load is coming from and how it is loaded as well. By the time the middle tanks were unloaded the ship bent and snapped up in the middle.
    Bil lD

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    Big stuff takes long-term planning and commitment. US companies refuse to do that.

    Just a couple years ago the assholes at Rexnord closed Falk and auctioned them off. They could make more money that year putting a shopping center on the site so who cares about 2023 ? Falk was well over a hundred years old, had equipment and abilities available nowhere else in the US, good work force, profitable, just not profitable enough for the worthless scum running that company. Irreplaceable, in fact.

    With people like that at the top, what do you expect ?
    Rexnord is owned by Carlyle Group, a Washington, D.C., private equity group.

    From here:
    Rexnord to Buy Falk for $295 Million

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    Quote Originally Posted by sfriedberg View Post
    I bet the buyer (presumably the port) specified which direction the cranes would be oriented on board, with an eye on which dock the ship would eventually offload at. Logistics for big things are pretty interesting, too.
    If you don't follow Mammoet or Sarens on Instagram, you should. They do some amazing stuff.

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    Thanks for the recommendation, but I don't do Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram at all. And only very lightly into Youtube when there's something specific to watch.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sfriedberg View Post
    Thanks for the recommendation, but I don't do Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram at all. And only very lightly into Youtube when there's something specific to watch.
    Try gcaptain.com

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    Thanks, I didn't recognize the URL, but when I visited it, I realized I'd read something there (or an incredibly similar site) a while back.


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