Any problem with using Rol-A-Lifts to move Clausing-C Lathe? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    My monarch 16x54 lathe weighs in aprox 6000 lbs so is similar to what you are getting and the center of gravity is just about centered on the chuck. If everything that moves is slid as far right as it can go the CG will move 6" or so twords tailstock.
    Be sure to add front to back bracing like thermite mentioned above.
    Might even leave the roll a lifts attached at each end so if it does tilt the EPJ it will still roll.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cannonmn View Post
    Good suggestions. One thing about the EPJ that’s good is that if you aren’t pressing on either the forward or reverse control, the brakes are on hard. Or if you let go of the steering/control T handle, brakes go on, so no lowering needed to stop hard.

    Another thing I’m considering is forming a volunteer rigging team out of members of our machinist’s club (CAMS.). Some people have some gear, some have other, some have big trucks, some have experience. We’re trying to do this due to lack of prof. Riggers in the DC area who will even give an estimate to move one or two machines.
    Brakes fail. Wheels slip, tip, get aimed sidegodlin. Make it a HABIT: Skids down. That's why they call them "skids".

    Keep all those observers TF back of a string or line of cones so they don't get in the way? Meahh...could be safe enough. If you have good crowd-control.

    But I wouldn't start 'til they were TF off my worksite.

    TROUBLE starts when the second pair of hands is added, is cubed by each extra pair.

    Same math as hardball riot-control.

    Take the FUNCTIONAL IQ of the stupidest, most contrarian, least situationally-aware, slowest-listener person in the mob.

    Safe to assume 70.

    Now DIVIDE BY the headcount. There's the effective IQ of a mob. That's why you have live ammunition and crew-served weapon backup to the naked bayonets.

    That's why safe rigging is not a church-social coleslaw and potato-salad horsetrading, ass-grabbing, fake-lift, and bullshitting cluster-fondle exercise.

    The goods herein are all "single-hander" stuff anyway.

    Safety person stands aloof - well-clear. To call 911 if you get stupid or careless and molest the canine. Or administer a mercy-shot. They shoot HORSES, don't they?




    "Helpers" not ALREADY TRAINED AS A TEAM only guarantee that will happen, sooner and worser.

    Formal training first. Proofed as a team. Pass critical review. Stay "current" or stay home.

  3. #23
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    Our rigging job on the 5400 lb, 12’ long Colchester went well at the origin and badly at destination. Used the handy Sunbelt 6 x 14’ drop-bed trailer, worked perfectly. First 2 hrs. with the lathe were the 3 of us trying to get some daylight under either end of lathe. Was crammed in among other in-use machines and hard to access, couldn’t even get a workable angle with Johnson bar. We got the boss to drag HS end out in open with his machinery and everything worked better for us. Our trolley jack and toe jack couldn’t get under the very low base anywhere so I put a 9 x 24 x 1/2” steel plate under the edge and over a toe jack’s toe and got it up high enough to start work, and in about 45 min. we had HS end on an oak skid and TS end raised up by a 5000 lb. cap. Rol-A-Lift. We drove the electric pallet jack under the HS skid, raised rather legs, and slowly drove the lathe out of the building onto the trailer. Next 45 min. was securing lathe in trailer. We left our EPJ and a few other large items there as trailer was quite full with the lathe. I do love those drop-bed trailers and I’d buy one but it would just sit and rust about 360 days a year.

    On arrival at the shop I guess I had become overconfident and didn’t have second thoughts about unloading on unlevel, potholed asphalt parking lot. I really should have thought that out better. The next four hours where I was alone were very difficult, exhausting, and taught me to NEVER do that again. Somehow lathe didn’t fall over and no one got hurt, but many times it looked like the worst was about to happen. Scary and totally unnecessary. Load and unload heavy machine tools on smooth, level concrete only, unless there’s absolutely no choice, then get a crane or something that will keep it airborne.

    Photos: one shows damaged skid. I had 4x4’s inside that skid in transit to guard against collapse, but of course had to remove to use forks in it at destination. I replaced that oak skid with another as soon as it began to fail like that, but put 1/8” steel plate on top, preventing any skid damage from then on. Another pic shows second trip made by the drop-bed trailer. Since origin of stuff only 45 min. away, I left a few of the larger rigging tools there and picked up next day. Owner of that place saw me using one Rol-a-Lift and asked if I wanted two more he was no longer using, free, and that question was a no-brainer. Orange things are 8-ton skates I rented but did not use. I like that kind, fewer moving parts than the “tank track” type. I spun all the rollers just to make sure it worked for future rentals, and they all spun very smoothly.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails b3856477-67d9-41b8-916c-b2518edc8332.jpg   066b66f3-ef93-44ee-bf84-cd84e4f3b34c.jpg   156d6abe-e368-46ce-abd8-1bf666d7a412.jpg   fe2ce761-6fdb-4ffe-9e17-05de30d19e45.jpg   365d5a3d-4954-4ff1-bb9f-37c65d80b857.jpg  

    Last edited by Cannonmn; 09-14-2018 at 07:39 AM. Reason: Add

  4. #24
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    Congrats on your survival and the lathes too...
    Now that you own Rol-a-lifts everything will become mobile

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  6. #25
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    "All's well that end's well", but lessons learned...

    Quote Originally Posted by Cannonmn View Post
    ..the 3 of us trying to get some daylight under either end of lathe. Was crammed in among other in-use machines and hard to access, couldn’t even get a workable angle with Johnson bar.
    That's what the log-splitter wedges on my list were for. Apply with short-handled "hand driving hammer" and one soon has purchase for the 3/4" a smaller 5-T toe-jack needs.

    an oak skid
    ..
    Photos: one shows damaged skid. I had 4x4’s inside that skid in transit to guard against collapse, but of course had to remove to use forks in it at destination. I replaced that oak skid with another as soon as it began to fail like that, but put 1/8” steel plate on top, preventing any skid damage from then on.
    That.. https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...f666d7a412.jpg

    ...is NOT a "skid".

    It's a pallet. And not as strong as a pallet should be for the HS of an 8000 Series Colchester, either.

    IF one must dooo that, given a pallet-jack needs an open bottom, where a FL is "don't care", THEN ..use 4" X 6" center rib, 4" X 6" outer edge, all three laid flat, scab all three with 1" X 6" if extra clearance is required for the EPJ.

    The deck, I'd have done in 4" X 6" as well. "SYP" if yah got it, other conifers OK, too - so long as thick enough. No need of Oak.

    With that much fab work, ACTUAL "skids" would have been faster to fab, cost much less in material, be more readily re-usable as grillage and blocking in general, and - so long as pressure-treat was avoided, be at least fuel for a wood-stove at end-of-life!


    I wasn't in love with the "lightweight" cross-timbers here,

    Monarch lathe on the garage floor

    .. but it was a fair match to your Colchester.

    And it worked. Quickly. And no "drama":

    Monarch lathe on the garage floor


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